a greater cardiac output must be an advantage..right?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Realdean, Mar 2, 2003.

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  1. Realdean

    Realdean Guest

    Having determined my max HR to be 168 and my next door neighbors to be 210, its safe to conclude
    that my neighbors cardiac output measured in liter/min is probably 25% greater than mine. So if all
    things are equal except for that fact, I must conclude that my neigher has a comtetitve advantage
    because his heart can supply 25% more oxygen to muscle tissue per minute than my heart. He can meet
    a higher demand for oxygen than I can. I have read that max HR is useful for determining
    performance zones and AT and "really isn't a sign of athletic performance" but in 2 individuals
    that are relatively equal except for max HR, the person with the higher max has to have an
    advantage because his/her anerobic threshold is probably higher because of the great cardiac
    output. AM I correct or off base?
     
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  2. Andy Coggan

    Andy Coggan Guest

    "realdean" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Having determined my max HR to be 168 and my next door neighbors to be 210, its safe to conclude
    > that my neighbors cardiac output measured in liter/min is probably 25% greater than mine. So if
    > all things are equal except for that fact, I must conclude that my neigher has a comtetitve
    > advantage because his heart can supply 25% more oxygen to muscle tissue per minute than my heart.
    > He can meet a higher demand for oxygen than I can. I have read that max HR is useful for
    > determining performance zones and AT and "really isn't a sign of athletic performance" but in 2
    > individuals that are relatively equal except for max HR, the person with the higher max has to
    > have an advantage because his/her anerobic threshold is probably higher because of the great
    > cardiac output. AM I correct or off base?

    You're off base because you're assuming that stroke volume is always the same, when it isn't - in
    fact, differences in stroke volume account for most of the difference in VO2max, and essentially all
    of the difference in maximal cardiac output, between individuals with widely differing VO2max
    values. (Differences in arteriovenous O2 extraction also exist, but at most can account for about a
    10% difference in VO2max.)

    Andy Coggan
     
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