A lesson from Pete (first aid)

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Mtb Lover, Nov 17, 2003.

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  1. Mtb Lover

    Mtb Lover Guest

    I read Pete Fagerlin's web page for the first time tonight. Nice page BTW. Looking at the carnage
    update, it made me think what a good idea it is to bring some basic first aid items onto the trail
    with me. I can only assume most of you do this, I use a Blow out Bag under my seat, plus whatever I
    can fit in my Camelback. What items have prove most useful for a space conscious rider?
    --
    Jerry [email protected] remove the nospam and the period to email me.
     
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  2. Penny S

    Penny S Guest

    MTB Lover's cat walked across a keyboard and came up with this:
    > I read Pete Fagerlin's web page for the first time tonight. Nice page BTW. Looking at the carnage
    > update, it made me think what a good idea it is to bring some basic first aid items onto the trail
    > with me. I can only assume most of you do this, I use a Blow out Bag under my seat, plus whatever
    > I can fit in my Camelback. What items have prove most useful for a space conscious rider?

    Here's what I keep in a ziplock:

    gloves, gauzes, tape, betadine/alcohol wipes, neosporin pockets, TP and feminine necessities.

    You can rinse things with your camel back, wipe up the blood with the gauze and use some morewith
    tape to cover things until you get home. The uses of TP etc should be obvious.

    Penny
     
  3. Paladin

    Paladin Guest

    Penny S wrote:

    > MTB Lover's cat walked across a keyboard and came up with this:
    >
    >>I read Pete Fagerlin's web page for the first time tonight. Nice page BTW. Looking at the carnage
    >>update, it made me think what a good idea it is to bring some basic first aid items onto the trail
    >>with me. I can only assume most of you do this, I use a Blow out Bag under my seat, plus whatever
    >>I can fit in my Camelback. What items have prove most useful for a space conscious rider?
    >>
    >
    > Here's what I keep in a ziplock:
    >
    > gloves, gauzes, tape, betadine/alcohol wipes, neosporin pockets, TP and feminine necessities.
    >
    > You can rinse things with your camel back, wipe up the blood with the gauze and use some morewith
    > tape to cover things until you get home. The uses of TP etc should be obvious.
    >
    > Penny
    >
    That's an impressive kit, (since I saw you get to use it one time.) ;)

    Here's a summary of what I have. Sock tops, (great to slide over an arm or leg to hold a bandage on,
    or to soak up blood, bandaids, antiseptic stuff, tape, gauze, 4x4's, sprain wrap (forgot the
    name)tiny first aid kit, alcohol wipes, ibuprofens, tums, other crap I can't think of now. Thinking
    of adding gloves and a surgical type of superglue.

    All fits real well in the Mule. And I've used it all a time or two.

    Paladin
     
  4. Jon Bond

    Jon Bond Guest

    "Paladin" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Penny S wrote:
    >
    > > MTB Lover's cat walked across a keyboard and came up with this:
    > >
    > >>I read Pete Fagerlin's web page for the first time tonight. Nice page BTW. Looking at the
    > >>carnage update, it made me think what a good idea it is to bring some basic first aid items onto
    > >>the trail with me. I can only assume most of you do this, I use a Blow out Bag under my seat,
    > >>plus whatever I can fit in my Camelback. What items have prove most useful for a space conscious
    > >>rider?
    > >>
    > >
    > > Here's what I keep in a ziplock:
    > >
    > > gloves, gauzes, tape, betadine/alcohol wipes, neosporin pockets, TP and feminine necessities.
    > >
    > > You can rinse things with your camel back, wipe up the blood with the
    gauze
    > > and use some morewith tape to cover things until you get home. The uses
    of
    > > TP etc should be obvious.
    > >
    > > Penny
    > >
    > That's an impressive kit, (since I saw you get to use it one time.) ;)
    >
    >
    > Here's a summary of what I have. Sock tops, (great to slide over an arm or leg to hold a bandage
    > on, or to soak up blood, bandaids, antiseptic stuff, tape, gauze, 4x4's, sprain wrap (forgot the
    > name)tiny first aid kit, alcohol wipes, ibuprofens, tums, other crap I can't think of now.
    > Thinking of adding gloves and a surgical type of superglue.

    Gloves good, glue bad. Throw some steri-strips or butterfly bandages in there instead.

    The problem with the glue is that it basically replaces stitches. However, it needs a very smooth
    edge to work well, which means a clean cut. It also means that its semi-permanent, and if there's
    any dirt or whatnot in there (which there's bound to be) it probably can't be opened back up to take
    that junk out. It's not strong enough to hold a large gouge closed, unless it isn't spreading much.

    Steri strips are a very good alternative. They're basically stretchy strips of adhesive. You put it
    on one side, stretch it to the other, and it closes the cut up really nicely. They're easy to take
    off, they're surprisingly strong, they'll keep things closed even when its moving and stretching
    (like when you need to bike out...), and they're a lot less likely to end up making your first aid
    kit a solid block of glued bandages.

    > All fits real well in the Mule. And I've used it all a time or two.

    Similar to my pack. Lots of gauze (rolls and 4x4 sheets), bandaids, little triple antibiotic
    packets, sprain wrap (which self sticks and can compress wounds like mad), ace bandage (which
    doesn't, but is more useful in some situations because it can slide on itself some), medical tape.
    Also ibuprofen (not asprin, which can thin the blood!), possibly some vicoprofen (vicadin+ibuprofen)
    I've still got left over from wisdom teeth removal for when things get really bad, epipen (I don't
    have it, but I should), matches if you're out in the boonies (or a lighter), and on and on. A knife
    is always nice too - if I'm on a long ride, my leatherman comes with me.

    > Paladin

    Jon Bond
     
  5. Jd

    Jd Guest

    MTB Lover <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I read Pete Fagerlin's web page for the first time tonight. Nice page BTW. Looking at the carnage
    > update, it made me think what a good idea it is to bring some basic first aid items onto the trail
    > with me. I can only assume most of you do this, I use a Blow out Bag under my seat, plus whatever
    > I can fit in my Camelback. What items have prove most useful for a space conscious rider?

    Skill.

    JD
     
  6. Mtb Lover

    Mtb Lover Guest

    JD wrote:
    > MTB Lover <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >>I read Pete Fagerlin's web page for the first time tonight. Nice page BTW. Looking at the carnage
    >>update, it made me think what a good idea it is to bring some basic first aid items onto the trail
    >>with me. I can only assume most of you do this, I use a Blow out Bag under my seat, plus whatever
    >>I can fit in my Camelback. What items have prove most useful for a space conscious rider?
    >
    >
    > Skill.
    >
    > JD
    I would assume no matter what your skill level, you are always pushing your limits. That is where
    the first aid kit comes in :)

    --
    Jerry [email protected] remove the nospam and the period to email me.
     
  7. Kantspel

    Kantspel Guest

    >>What items have prove most useful for a space conscious rider?
    >
    > Skill.
    >
    > JD

    That doesn't help if a buddy (or stranger) bites it. I've only had to patch myself up once but have
    helped others plenty of times. I've also seen enough freak accidents to know that skill isn't
    always enough.

    Same for tools, they get used on other peoples bikes a lot more than mine.
     
  8. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On 18 Nov 2003 09:04:48 -0800, JD wrote:
    > MTB Lover <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >> I read Pete Fagerlin's web page for the first time tonight. Nice page BTW. Looking at the
    >> carnage update, it made me think what a good idea it is to bring some basic first aid items
    >> onto the trail with me. I can only assume most of you do this, I use a Blow out Bag under my
    >> seat, plus whatever I can fit in my Camelback. What items have prove most useful for a space
    >> conscious rider?
    >
    > Skill.

    Or, lacking that, common sense. I've really had very few reasons to patch myself (or my riding buds)
    up over the past several years.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least) "It's a shallow life that
    doesn't give a person a few scars" - Garrison Keillor
     
  9. On 18 Nov 2003 19:23:47 GMT, BB <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 18 Nov 2003 09:04:48 -0800, JD wrote:
    >> MTB Lover <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:<[email protected]>...
    >>> I read Pete Fagerlin's web page for the first time tonight. Nice page BTW. Looking at the
    >>> carnage update, it made me think what a good idea it is to bring some basic first aid items onto
    >>> the trail with me. I can only assume most of you do this, I use a Blow out Bag under my seat,
    >>> plus whatever I can fit in my Camelback. What items have prove most useful for a space conscious
    >>> rider?
    >>
    >> Skill.
    >
    >Or, lacking that, common sense. I've really had very few reasons to patch myself (or my riding
    >buds) up over the past several years.

    If you think that "common sense" is sufficient enough to save you from an accident, then we have
    different definitions of "accident."

    pete fagerlin

    ::Revolutionary! Evolutionary! Yet so retro! :www.yestubes.com
     
  10. Paladin

    Paladin Guest

    kantspel wrote:

    > >>What items have prove most
    >
    >>> useful for a space conscious rider?
    >>
    >>
    >> Skill.
    >>
    >> JD
    >
    >
    > That doesn't help if a buddy (or stranger) bites it. I've only had to patch myself up once but
    > have helped others plenty of times. I've also seen enough freak accidents to know that skill isn't
    > always enough.
    >
    > Same for tools, they get used on other peoples bikes a lot more than mine.
    >

    Same here. I've come upon biffed, bleeding fools, and patched them up. I've watched crashes and sped
    to help. I yelled across a small canyon once telling this doof to go home and get a helmet. 30 mins
    later I'd caught him and he was a mask of blood where he'd cut his chin & forehead open. Given (and
    used) those sock-type bandages at least half a dozen times. Slide them up my calf, or on my arm.
    Gave out the ibuprofen a few times. Took the tums when my all-you-can-eat Chinese or recent
    beer-n-pizza caught up with a 6-mile climb. Biffed it pretty good once coming down a rocky creekbed
    real careful-like when a big beetle slammed into my ear and tried to hitch the remainder of the ride
    in there. Now that's pure joy. A bloody yard sale. yadda, yadda, yadda.

    So I'll still carry a lot of crap, and I'll take Bond's advice on skipping the glue. Just that a lot
    of boxing injuries are now being closed up with glue, so I thought it made sense for riding, too.

    Paladin
     
  11. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >What items have prove most useful for a space conscious rider?

    Dunno from "space concious" but the thoroughtly-paranoid rider carries a little squeeze bottle of
    betadyne - antibiotic-resistant staph and all that....
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
  12. Mojo Deluxe

    Mojo Deluxe Guest

    "Stephen Baker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > MTB Lover says:
    >
    > >I would assume no matter what your skill level, you are always pushing your limits.
    >
    > Not me, Bubba! I know my limits and stay inside them coz I's a WUSS. Too
    damn
    > old to start breakin' bones now. (Well, I _feel_ old, anyhoo)
    >
    I don't crash that often, simply because I do stay within my limits, and still manage to have fun.
    I've only had one major biff, and it was a freak thing. There was no blood involved, but there was
    plenty bump, bruises, a slight concussion, and one damaged Bell helmet. Of all places to endo, it
    was dropping into a canal with chunks of concrete in the bottom resembling rocks.

    > Steve "smart"

    Steve, I fixed it for you.
     
  13. Mojo Deluxe

    Mojo Deluxe Guest

    "Stephen Baker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Mojo Deluxe says:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > >Of all places to endo, it was dropping into a canal with chunks of concrete in the bottom
    resembling
    > >rocks.
    >
    > Good choice! ;-)
    >
    Funny thing was, as out of it as I was, the first thing, before I did an inventory of what was hurt,
    I drug my bike out of the water. Priorities, man!

    > >> Steve "smart"
    > >
    > >Steve, I fixed it for you.
    >
    > Thanks - I needed that.....
    >
    Hey, I'm not the most daring rider in the world.
     
  14. Zilla

    Zilla Guest

    "P e t e F a g e r l i n" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On 18 Nov 2003 19:23:47 GMT, BB <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >On 18 Nov 2003 09:04:48 -0800, JD wrote:
    > >> MTB Lover <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > >>> I read Pete Fagerlin's web page for the first time tonight. Nice page BTW. Looking at the
    > >>> carnage update, it made me think what a good idea
    it
    > >>> is to bring some basic first aid items onto the trail with me. I can only assume most of you
    > >>> do this, I use a Blow out Bag under my seat, plus whatever I can fit in my Camelback. What
    > >>> items have prove most useful for a space conscious rider?
    > >>
    > >> Skill.
    > >
    > >Or, lacking that, common sense. I've really had very few reasons to patch myself (or my riding
    > >buds) up over the past several years.
    >
    > If you think that "common sense" is sufficient enough to save you from an accident, then we have
    > different definitions of "accident."
    >
    > pete fagerlin
    >
    > ::Revolutionary! Evolutionary! Yet so retro! :www.yestubes.com

    How about instinct discerned from riding, riding, riding, and more riding?

    --
    - Zilla Cary, NC (Remove XSPAM)
     
  15. On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 19:37:32 -0500, "Zilla" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> If you think that "common sense" is sufficient enough to save you
    from
    >> an accident, then we have different definitions of "accident."

    >How about instinct discerned from riding, riding, riding, and more
    riding?

    Key word:

    "accident"
     
  16. Mojo Deluxe

    Mojo Deluxe Guest

    "P e t e F a g e r l i n" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 19:37:32 -0500, "Zilla" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >> If you think that "common sense" is sufficient enough to save you
    > from
    > >> an accident, then we have different definitions of "accident."
    >
    > >How about instinct discerned from riding, riding, riding, and more
    > riding?
    >
    > Key word:
    >
    > "accident"

    Minimized by common sense.
     
  17. Ctg

    Ctg Guest

    "Zilla" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "P e t e F a g e r l i n" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > On 18 Nov 2003 19:23:47 GMT, BB <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > >On 18 Nov 2003 09:04:48 -0800, JD wrote:
    > > >> MTB Lover <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > >>> I read Pete Fagerlin's web page for the first time tonight. Nice
    page
    > > >>> BTW. Looking at the carnage update, it made me think what a good
    idea
    > it
    > > >>> is to bring some basic first aid items onto the trail with me. I can only assume most of you
    > > >>> do this, I use a Blow out Bag under my seat, plus whatever I can fit in my Camelback. What
    > > >>> items have prove most useful for a space conscious rider?
    > > >>
    > > >> Skill.
    > > >
    > > >Or, lacking that, common sense. I've really had very few reasons to
    patch
    > > >myself (or my riding buds) up over the past several years.
    > >
    > > If you think that "common sense" is sufficient enough to save you from an accident, then we have
    > > different definitions of "accident."
    > >
    > > pete fagerlin
    > >
    > > ::Revolutionary! Evolutionary! Yet so retro! :www.yestubes.com
    >
    > How about instinct discerned from riding, riding, riding, and more riding?

    Isn't that a definition of skill?

    Chris

    >
    > --
    > - Zilla Cary, NC (Remove XSPAM)
     
  18. On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 19:16:46 -0600, "Mojo Deluxe" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"P e t e F a g e r l i n" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 19:37:32 -0500, "Zilla" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> >> If you think that "common sense" is sufficient enough to save
    you
    >> from
    >> >> an accident, then we have different definitions of "accident."
    >>
    >> >How about instinct discerned from riding, riding, riding, and more
    >> riding?
    >>
    >> Key word:
    >>
    >> "accident"
    >
    >Minimized by common sense.

    But not eliminated.

    That's why they are called accidents.
     
  19. Mojo Deluxe

    Mojo Deluxe Guest

    "P e t e F a g e r l i n" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 19:16:46 -0600, "Mojo Deluxe" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"P e t e F a g e r l i n" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]...
    > >> On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 19:37:32 -0500, "Zilla" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >> If you think that "common sense" is sufficient enough to save
    > you
    > >> from
    > >> >> an accident, then we have different definitions of "accident."
    > >>
    > >> >How about instinct discerned from riding, riding, riding, and more
    > >> riding?
    > >>
    > >> Key word:
    > >>
    > >> "accident"
    > >
    > >Minimized by common sense.
    >
    > But not eliminated.
    >
    > That's why they are called accidents.
    >
    I agree.
     
  20. Bill Porter

    Bill Porter Guest

    On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 04:28:31 GMT, MTB Lover <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I read Pete Fagerlin's web page for the first time tonight. Nice page BTW. Looking at the carnage
    >update, it made me think what a good idea it is to bring some basic first aid items onto the trail
    >with me. I can only assume most of you do this, I use a Blow out Bag under my seat, plus whatever I
    >can fit in my Camelback. What items have prove most useful for a space conscious rider?

    Here is my first aid kit that I keep in a ziplockmy camelbak all the time. It weighs next to
    nothings and take up little room. 2 - Antibacterial ointment packs (single use) 2 - Antiseptic Pads
    3 - 3x4" Triple layer nonstick pads 4 - 800mg motrin 1 - 3"gauze bandage First Aid tape - About 5'
    of it taken off the roll and rewrapped flat 4 - large bandaids 4 - small bandaids 4 - Cotton swabs A
    little sheet of paper with inventory on it.

    Bill Porter www.mountainbikebill.com
     
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