a new bike.

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Flaps, May 10, 2004.

  1. Flaps

    Flaps Guest

    So I've been doing a fair bit of travelling for work recently, and built up
    a pile of American Express "rewards" points paying for hotels, flights,
    inappropriately large meal and drink bills etc.

    Looking though the list, I could get a 2MP digital camera... nope... or an
    Oroton handbag.... I don't think so... oooh...light aircraft training
    flight.. damn not available in Victoria.

    oooh... I can get a Trek 4100
    http://www66.americanexpress.com/mr...searchType=rewardDetail&id=3768-1988&seqnum=1
    Done deal. I just sent off for the certificate I need to trade for the bike
    at my LBS.

    So my question to you guys is, assuming I'm starting with nothing , what
    would you recommend I pick up at the same time? I'll be using it mostly
    weekends on bike paths.. maybe a bit of commuting.... so I'm thinking a half
    decent helmet of course, a computer, but what else? I was reading
    somewhere that the plastic pedals that come with entry level Trek bikes like
    the 4100 should be the first to go, but I'm looking for your experienced and
    sage like advice to help me make up a shopping list.

    --
    Regards,
    Flaps.
     
    Tags:


  2. DRS

    DRS Guest

    "Flaps" <flaps> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    [...]

    > oooh... I can get a Trek 4100
    >

    http://www66.americanexpress.com/mr...searchType=rewardDetail&id=3768-1988&seqnum=1
    > Done deal. I just sent off for the certificate I need to trade for
    > the bike at my LBS.


    So who's the lucky bastard then?

    BTW, there's a better picture and specs at
    http://www.trekbikes.com/bikes/2004/mountain/4100.jsp.

    > So my question to you guys is, assuming I'm starting with nothing ,
    > what would you recommend I pick up at the same time? I'll be using it
    > mostly weekends on bike paths.. maybe a bit of commuting.... so I'm
    > thinking a half decent helmet of course, a computer, but what else?
    > I was reading somewhere that the plastic pedals that come with entry
    > level Trek bikes like the 4100 should be the first to go, but I'm
    > looking for your experienced and sage like advice to help me make up
    > a shopping list.


    I wouldn't worry about the pedals unless you want to go clipless (but then
    you also have to buy the shoes at the same time and they're not cheap, so
    it's not something to rush). What I would suggest, at least for the short
    to medium term, is buy a set of plastic toe-clips for about $10. They'll at
    least ensure your foot is positioned correctly on the pedal, thereby
    increasing your efficiency albeit not by as much as clipless.

    As well as the helmet (something around the $40 mark should be about right
    for a recreational MTBer) get a set of gloves. Winter weight gloves will
    set you back anything from $40-$80, summer weight ones around $15-$45. If
    nothing else they'll stop your hands ending up black from the rubber grips
    and if the palms are padded will make longer rides more comfortable.

    Check the saddle out carefully. It's hard to tell from the pictures but
    Bontrager saddles tend not to have centre cutouts, which means they can put
    undue pressure on the perineal area with adverse consequences for your
    dangly bits. Talk to the bike shop about a saddle with a centre cutout.

    By law you need at least minimal lighting if you want to ride after dusk.
    You can get away with seriously cheap front and rear lights which will do
    nothing more than make you somewhat visible to drivers for about $30-$50.
    If you want to get serious you can spend more than $600 on top-end front
    lights. But you must get something.

    You'll also want a decent lock (since I live in St Kilda I have two locks).
    I like the Kryptonite LS D-locks ($79/$89). Avoid the el cheapo copies.
    Get the longer one for the extra $10, the extra few centimetres will make
    life a lot easier in terms of being able to lock your bike to posts and
    stuff. I also have a cable lock, cheaper ($20-$40) but a bit more flexible.

    You'll need a water bottle cage ($10-$15) and a water bottle ($10-$12).

    You'll want a pump. A decent floor pump for home will set you back around
    $70-$90 for a model with a built-in gauge. A decent mini-pump for taking
    with you on the road will be around $40-$50. I have a Blackburn; a lot of
    people swear by Zefal.

    You may want to consider a set of plastic clip-on mud-guards for the winter
    to stop the tyres spraying surface water all over you. Zefal/SKS for around
    $25-$35.

    Then there's a tool kit (Topeak/Park Tool for about $40-$60), puncture kit
    ($6-$8), tyre levers ($5-$10) and a saddle bag to keep it all in ($25-$50).
    I also keep a Zefal pressure gauge in mine ($30). Chain lube goes for
    $10-$20.

    It's too hard to recommend clothing. Nix start at $40 and go up to stupid
    prices, jerseys start at about $50 and go up to even more stupid prices, and
    don't get me started on the price of decent rain gear.

    When you've sorted through that little lot we can start discussing some of
    the more esoteric gear you'll end up wanting. :)

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  3. Flaps

    Flaps Guest

    "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > So who's the lucky bastard then?


    yeah... and thank you for maintaining at least *some* control.

    >
    > BTW, there's a better picture and specs at
    > http://www.trekbikes.com/bikes/2004/mountain/4100.jsp.
    >

    oooohhh.... purty. I was going to ask for the red one, but silver looks
    rather flash.

    > I wouldn't worry about the pedals unless you want to go clipless (but then


    you're probably right... I should just stick with toe-clips for a while.
    Thats what I had
    on my last bike up until I "lost" it from the garage one night a while ago.
    So I'll definitely take your advice
    on the Kryptonite lock particularly as I'd expect a shiny new bike like this
    one to attract attention
    at least until it gets properly scratched up and dirty.

    Strewth.
    http://www.kryptonitelock.com/[email protected]?artid=2736&atf=products_item&pgrp=20
    Maybe a little over the top. The D-clamp along with a "accessory cable" will
    probably be enough?

    > Check the saddle out carefully. It's hard to tell from the pictures but
    > Bontrager saddles tend not to have centre cutouts, which means they can

    put
    > undue pressure on the perineal area with adverse consequences for your
    > dangly bits. Talk to the bike shop about a saddle with a centre cutout.


    I've fathered 4 children, so accidental sterilisation from a poor saddle is
    probably a good
    thing. But I'll take you advice! I saw a Trek bike in a store a few days
    ago. It wasnt a 4100,
    I think it was a model or two up the tree, but it had a two part sadle like
    you describe. I'll check
    it out when I go to pick it up and upgrade if necesary.

    > It's too hard to recommend clothing. Nix start at $40 and go up to stupid
    > prices, jerseys start at about $50 and go up to even more stupid prices,

    and
    > don't get me started on the price of decent rain gear.


    I'll get a proper pair of bike nix, but as for the rest of it, I *really*
    don't want to end up looking like some wanna-be
    w*nker ... I just want to be a comfortable weekend biker. Do I *have* to
    get a bright yellow lycra top with LOOK logos on it? Are they really worth
    it?
     
  4. DRS

    DRS Guest

    "Flaps" <flaps> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> So who's the lucky bastard then?

    >
    > yeah... and thank you for maintaining at least *some* control.


    :)

    >> BTW, there's a better picture and specs at
    >> http://www.trekbikes.com/bikes/2004/mountain/4100.jsp.
    >>

    > oooohhh.... purty. I was going to ask for the red one, but silver
    > looks rather flash.


    Heh. I've got a silver Shogun and I like it heaps but I'd rather have had a
    red one. Red ones go faster.

    [...]

    > while ago. So I'll definitely take your advice
    > on the Kryptonite lock particularly as I'd expect a shiny new bike
    > like this one to attract attention
    > at least until it gets properly scratched up and dirty.
    >
    > Strewth.
    >

    http://www.kryptonitelock.com/[email protected]?artid=2736&atf=products_item&pgrp=20
    > Maybe a little over the top. The D-clamp along with a "accessory
    > cable" will probably be enough?


    Over the top at $89? No way. The bike as is retails for $499 and you're
    about to spend a bunch of money on it. Why save $50 only to lose $500?

    [...]

    >> It's too hard to recommend clothing. Nix start at $40 and go up to
    >> stupid prices, jerseys start at about $50 and go up to even more
    >> stupid prices, and don't get me started on the price of decent rain
    >> gear.

    >
    > I'll get a proper pair of bike nix, but as for the rest of it, I


    I like the Netti 8-panel Pronix. I find the 6-panel Aeronix hard to get
    comfortable in, if you get my drift.

    > *really* don't want to end up looking like some wanna-be
    > w*nker ... I just want to be a comfortable weekend biker. Do I
    > *have* to get a bright yellow lycra top with LOOK logos on it? Are
    > they really worth it?


    Indeed. I refuse to buy bike gear unless the logo is discreet. But you will
    need a decent top. Once you start sweating and drench your cotton T-shirt
    you'll understand the importance of wicking materials.

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  5. Bert L.am

    Bert L.am Guest

    "DRS" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    news:[email protected]
    > "Flaps" <flaps> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > >> So who's the lucky bastard then?

    > >
    > > yeah... and thank you for maintaining at least *some* control.

    >
    > :)
    >
    > >> BTW, there's a better picture and specs at
    > >> http://www.trekbikes.com/bikes/2004/mountain/4100.jsp.
    > >>

    > > oooohhh.... purty. I was going to ask for the red one, but silver
    > > looks rather flash.

    >
    > Heh. I've got a silver Shogun and I like it heaps but I'd rather have had

    a
    > red one. Red ones go faster.
    >
    > [...]
    >
    > > while ago. So I'll definitely take your advice
    > > on the Kryptonite lock particularly as I'd expect a shiny new bike
    > > like this one to attract attention
    > > at least until it gets properly scratched up and dirty.
    > >
    > > Strewth.
    > >

    >

    http://www.kryptonitelock.com/[email protected]?artid=2736&atf=products_item&pgrp=20
    > > Maybe a little over the top. The D-clamp along with a "accessory
    > > cable" will probably be enough?

    >
    > Over the top at $89? No way. The bike as is retails for $499 and you're
    > about to spend a bunch of money on it. Why save $50 only to lose $500?
    >
    > [...]
    >
    > >> It's too hard to recommend clothing. Nix start at $40 and go up to
    > >> stupid prices, jerseys start at about $50 and go up to even more
    > >> stupid prices, and don't get me started on the price of decent rain
    > >> gear.

    > >
    > > I'll get a proper pair of bike nix, but as for the rest of it, I

    >
    > I like the Netti 8-panel Pronix. I find the 6-panel Aeronix hard to get
    > comfortable in, if you get my drift.
    >
    > > *really* don't want to end up looking like some wanna-be
    > > w*nker ... I just want to be a comfortable weekend biker. Do I
    > > *have* to get a bright yellow lycra top with LOOK logos on it? Are
    > > they really worth it?

    >
    > Indeed. I refuse to buy bike gear unless the logo is discreet. But you

    will
    > need a decent top. Once you start sweating and drench your cotton T-shirt
    > you'll understand the importance of wicking materials.
    >
    > --
    >
    > A: Top-posters.
    > Q: What is the most annoying thing on Usenet?
    >
    >



    Cycling Gloves!


    --
    Posted by news://news.nb.nu
     
  6. D&M Johnston

    D&M Johnston Guest

    "Flaps" <flaps> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > So who's the lucky bastard then?

    >
    > yeah... and thank you for maintaining at least *some* control.
    >
    > >
    > > BTW, there's a better picture and specs at
    > > http://www.trekbikes.com/bikes/2004/mountain/4100.jsp.
    > >

    > oooohhh.... purty. I was going to ask for the red one, but silver looks
    > rather flash.
    >
    > > I wouldn't worry about the pedals unless you want to go clipless (but

    then
    >
    > you're probably right... I should just stick with toe-clips for a while.
    > Thats what I had
    > on my last bike up until I "lost" it from the garage one night a while

    ago.
    > So I'll definitely take your advice
    > on the Kryptonite lock particularly as I'd expect a shiny new bike like

    this
    > one to attract attention
    > at least until it gets properly scratched up and dirty.
    >
    > Strewth.
    >

    http://www.kryptonitelock.com/[email protected]?artid=2736&atf=products_item&pgrp=20
    > Maybe a little over the top. The D-clamp along with a "accessory cable"

    will
    > probably be enough?
    >
    > > Check the saddle out carefully. It's hard to tell from the pictures but
    > > Bontrager saddles tend not to have centre cutouts, which means they can

    > put
    > > undue pressure on the perineal area with adverse consequences for your
    > > dangly bits. Talk to the bike shop about a saddle with a centre cutout.

    >
    > I've fathered 4 children, so accidental sterilisation from a poor saddle

    is
    > probably a good
    > thing. But I'll take you advice! I saw a Trek bike in a store a few days
    > ago. It wasnt a 4100,
    > I think it was a model or two up the tree, but it had a two part sadle

    like
    > you describe. I'll check
    > it out when I go to pick it up and upgrade if necesary.
    >
    > > It's too hard to recommend clothing. Nix start at $40 and go up to

    stupid
    > > prices, jerseys start at about $50 and go up to even more stupid prices,

    > and
    > > don't get me started on the price of decent rain gear.

    >
    > I'll get a proper pair of bike nix, but as for the rest of it, I *really*
    > don't want to end up looking like some wanna-be
    > w*nker ... I just want to be a comfortable weekend biker. Do I *have* to
    > get a bright yellow lycra top with LOOK logos on it? Are they really worth
    > it?
    >
    > Honestly, I know some of these new cycling clothes are good for sweat

    shedding etc, but i think for the casual cyclist, it's going too overboard.
    When a cycling mad kid in the 70's, we didn't need all that stuff and we
    cycled all day just about everyday we weren't in school. Y'know, the old
    pair of jeans, T-shirt or if it's a bit cold we had denim jackets or
    parkers.

    Yeah they might've been a bit sweaty but no-one much cared when you're a
    kid. We survived many yrs without the highly expensive cycle clothing we
    have today.

    I'm not saying that it's a waste of money, the products used are of high
    quality material, but at a price, and i reckon untill you know if you're
    going to like riding the bike regularly, i'd hold off buying too much gear.

    It's bad enough we have to be forced in buying helmets now, I've had many
    prangs as a kid an older and never hit my head once, bit still I've now got
    used to wearing it .

    You have to understand that, some of the guys here are almost, if not
    completely fully reliant on their bikes, and yes the good gear is very much
    relevant to them, but as a casual rider and accasional communter, i think
    it'd be very easy to spend more on accessories, clothing that the actual
    bike is worth.

    At the bare minimum, a reasonable lock, minimum light set,1 or 2 pairs of
    nicks and a helmet will suffice, anything other than that you can do
    gradually but not all at once.

    Anyway, Happy riding
    DJ
     
  7. On Mon, 10 May 2004 23:31:15 +1000, "DRS"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    *Snippage*

    >When you've sorted through that little lot we can start discussing some of
    >the more esoteric gear you'll end up wanting. :)


    That's a great list from DRS. Just a couple more ideas:
    - Tyres. For sealed surfaces a slick tyre is much more efficient
    than the standard knobby ones. A slick tyre will be fine on hard
    gravel too, as long as it's at least (say) 28mm or 30mm wide, as it
    will probably be on a mountain bike.

    - Rack. For commuting, a lot of people like to carry stuff on the
    bike rather than in a backpack (less tiring, and you don't get a
    sweaty back). But it can also be less convenient and less trendy :)
    Your choice.

    If you're just starting to commute on the roads with traffic, the tips
    I've found most useful are at:

    http://www.bikexprt.com/streetsmarts/usa/

    Good luck!
     
  8. hippy

    hippy Guest

    >Originally posted by D&M Johnston Honestly, I know some of these new
    >cycling clothes are good for sweat shedding etc, but i think for the
    >casual cyclist, >it's going too overboard.


    Hear hear! or is that here here?

    My two t-shirts were fine this morning.. the more sweat the merrier! :)

    Yeah I own a bit of funky gear but for commuting I'm 99% of the time in
    t-shirts and nicks. I held out on lycra as long as possible but when you
    get to be doing >80k rides on an mtb.. chaffing in boxers or jocks is
    ridiculous! so I bit the bullet and bought nicks. I can still ride
    around in t-shirt/jumper and jeans but for anything over 20k's I'd go
    nix. The only reason I got a jersey in the first place was so I could
    carry stuff on long rides without having to take a whole backpack.. and
    then I started racing...

    hippy



    --
     
  9. Mike

    Mike Guest

  10. takver

    takver Guest

    Drs has given a great list. Not much to add. Clothing depends on the
    distance you'll be riding. I commute 9km into the city each day in
    normal office attire. In winter I'm the only one in the building still
    dressed in shorts! See how it feels before buying cycling attire.

    I did without a cycle computer for a long time, but eventually
    surrcombed last month and found I'm quite enjoying monitoring my
    'performance'. I spent $50 on a Sigma Sport BC800 - my son picked up a
    computer from Kathmandu for $17 which works just as well.

    Minimal front and rear lights will cost at least $40 and more
    like $60-70.

    Shiny new bike...don't scimp on the bike lock. Anyone with a couple of
    tools can break a cable lock in about 30 seconds. Chain and hardened
    padlock takes a bit longer. D locks take a lot more work to break. If
    you have quick release wheels, you may want to get a cable lock to
    ensure they stay with the bike when you lock the frame using the D-lock.
    Nothing worse than coming back to find your bike has only one wheel!

    Water bottle and cage are necessity. And my personal preference is to
    carry my loads in panniers on a rack at the rear. Commuting I generally
    ride with just one rear pannier which I have attached a shoulder strap
    for ease of carrying when I park the bike.

    Takver



    --
     
  11. Flaps

    Flaps Guest

    thanks for all the great advice guys... now all I have to do is bide my time
    until I can pick up the bike....

    Aparently Amex mail me the certificate, I then go to my local Trek dealer
    (one happens to be just 5 minutes away from where I work) , who will fit me
    to a frame size and order it from Trek in Sydney who then ships it down to
    Melbourne. So it aint going to be here any time real soon... probably be at
    least another week or two.

    I'll let you know how it goes after I get the first ride in.

    Flaps.
     
  12. stu

    stu Guest

    just thought of somethings to add to your list
    its not my money so here goes
    patch kit
    CO2 inflator (if you are riding to work and get a flat these things are
    great, to tight to use them myself)
    frame pump
    spare tube
    dicide how you are going to clean and oil your chain, buy what you need to
    do it the way you like

    stu
     
  13. hippy

    hippy Guest

    >>Originally posted by Mike hippy wrote: I can still ride around in t-
    >>shirt/jumper and jeans but for anything over 20k's I'd go nix.


    >Oh no! I just had the image of a (not the) fat hippy riding
    >wearing nix.


    >Please spell it "knicks" :)


    hehe lol.. ah yes, I see your point. I'll try to wear knicks from now on
    - a little more pleasing to the eye I'm sure!

    hippy



    --
     
  14. DRS

    DRS Guest

    "Andrew Reddaway" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Mon, 10 May 2004 23:31:15 +1000, "DRS"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > *Snippage*
    >
    >> When you've sorted through that little lot we can start discussing
    >> some of the more esoteric gear you'll end up wanting. :)

    >
    > That's a great list from DRS.


    Thank you, thanyouverymuch. For bonus points, who can spot the important
    item I left out (no, it's not a rack)?

    > Just a couple more ideas:
    > - Tyres. For sealed surfaces a slick tyre is much more efficient
    > than the standard knobby ones. A slick tyre will be fine on hard
    > gravel too, as long as it's at least (say) 28mm or 30mm wide, as it
    > will probably be on a mountain bike.


    Absolutely. I have a hybrid with 700 wheels and funnily enough it's harder
    to get fat slicks for 700s than it is for 26" or 27" wheels. It's highly
    irritating. I'm seriously thinking about importing some Avocet FasGrips
    from Sheldon Brown. They're the only slick I've found that goes up to
    700x35. Most manufacturers sem to thinks slicks should stop at 700x25.

    > - Rack. For commuting, a lot of people like to carry stuff on the
    > bike rather than in a backpack (less tiring, and you don't get a
    > sweaty back). But it can also be less convenient and less trendy :)
    > Your choice.


    True, but it can also make the rear of the bike unstable and unresponsive.
    I'm not necessarily a rack fan. YMMV.

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  15. DRS

    DRS Guest

    "takver" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:R4%[email protected]
    > Drs has given a great list. Not much to add. Clothing depends on the
    > distance you'll be riding. I commute 9km into the city each day in
    > normal office attire. In winter I'm the only one in the building still
    > dressed in shorts! See how it feels before buying cycling attire.


    And then you'll never go back. I might have ridden in T-shirts and jeans
    when I was a kid but I was too youing to know any better. I simply hate
    riding in street clothes these days. It's so heavy and constricting.

    [...]

    > Minimal front and rear lights will cost at least $40 and more
    > like $60-70.


    Not for minimal. You can get low end Cateye and Pioneer front and rear
    lights for $15 each.

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  16. DRS

    DRS Guest

    "Flaps" <flaps> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > thanks for all the great advice guys... now all I have to do is bide
    > my time until I can pick up the bike....
    >
    > Aparently Amex mail me the certificate, I then go to my local Trek
    > dealer (one happens to be just 5 minutes away from where I work) ,


    Have you been to the shop and talked with the people there? Would you want
    to entrust your pride and joy to their hands, especially in the first year
    when you'll most probably get free services? Not all bike shops are created
    equal. Just a thought.

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  17. Flaps

    Flaps Guest

    "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Have you been to the shop and talked with the people there? Would you

    want
    > to entrust your pride and joy to their hands, especially in the first year
    > when you'll most probably get free services? Not all bike shops are

    created
    > equal. Just a thought.


    yeah... dropped in yesterday to check em out. Its a small shop, but they
    have a pretty full range of trek bikes there and more importantly the guy I
    talked to seemed pretty genuine, interested and helpful. And yes, they do
    include the first 2 services free and discounts on gear.

    I hope it works out, 'cause the next nearest Trek dealer for me is all the
    way into City...
     
  18. Flaps

    Flaps Guest

  19. DRS

    DRS Guest

    "Flaps" <flaps> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "DRS" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>> Minimal front and rear lights will cost at least $40 and more
    >>> like $60-70.

    >>
    >> Not for minimal. You can get low end Cateye and Pioneer front and
    >> rear lights for $15 each.

    >
    > you want real minimal? Try the "no excuse" headlight from
    > http://www.bikexprt.com/streetsmarts/usa/chapter8a.htm


    Heh. Someone in rec.bicycles.tech was talking about something similar, only
    using a Cateye mount. Me, I'd rather spend $15.

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  20. flyingdutch

    flyingdutch Guest

    Drs wrote:
    > "I have a hybrid with 700 wheels and funnily enough it's harder to get
    > fat slicks for 700s than it is for 26" or 27" wheels. It's highly
    > irritating. I'm seriously thinking about importing some Avocet FasGrips
    > from Sheldon Brown. They're the only slick I've found that goes up to
    > 700x35. Most manufacturers sem to thinks slicks should stop at 700x25.




    huh?

    what about the half-a-dozen models Continental make? Gatorskins, tour-
    models, etc ??? Cecil may not stock em (surprisingly, they are really
    going off the boil IMHO) but SHM and most others will StKilda Cycles
    should be fairly heavily oriented in this regard to, i woulda thawt (or
    something like... http://www.cecilwalker.com.au/category245_1.htm which
    go up to 38mm)

    and as for Flap's nice dilemna ,youre all forgetting the most important
    thing of all! Some form of coffee-money-carrying device for post (or
    halfway) reward scheme:D :D :D



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