A Non-friction bicycle lights generator (dynamo)



In this new generation bicycle light system, no battery is needed, no
friction on any parts of the bicycle. The lights flash regardless speed
of the bicycle and weather conditions (unlike normal dynamos!). Very
bright.

It can be used as a stand-alone light system (as a normal dynamo) on
your bike, or used as a back-up for your existed battery-powered lights

All details and buy on-line: http://www.freelights.co.uk
 
G

GWood

Guest
Ya know, I looked at this and it doesn't sound all that wacky. Except for
the wiring strung around, it might be good for a commuter bike. I know when
I rode my hardtail as a commuter, I always forgot to turn off the flasher on
the seatpost.

But to keep this within the realm of MTBs: Here's a crazy thought.

If a magnetic field from a presumably tiny magnet can provide the energy
required for 2-3 LEDs. Why not magnetize disc rotors and use the larger
energies generated there for night lights? Or at least to trickle charge
the larger batteries required for night riding? Seems kinda wasterful to
have all that metal on a bike and use it only as a friction device to slow
down wheels?

Just a thought. It's raining. Hard.

<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> It can be used as a stand-alone light system (as a normal dynamo) on
> your bike, or used as a back-up for your existed battery-powered lights
>
> All details and buy on-line: http://www.freelights.co.uk
>
 
M

manuel borowski

Guest
GWood wrote:
> Ya know, I looked at this and it doesn't sound all that wacky. Except for
> the wiring strung around, it might be good for a commuter bike. I know when
> I rode my hardtail as a commuter, I always forgot to turn off the flasher on
> the seatpost.
>
> But to keep this within the realm of MTBs: Here's a crazy thought.
>
> If a magnetic field from a presumably tiny magnet can provide the energy
> required for 2-3 LEDs. Why not magnetize disc rotors and use the larger
> energies generated there for night lights? Or at least to trickle charge
> the larger batteries required for night riding? Seems kinda wasterful to
> have all that metal on a bike and use it only as a friction device to slow
> down wheels?

So that each and every magnetizable dust particle will cling to it?
Don't think that's such a good idea :)

> Just a thought. It's raining. Hard.
>
> <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>
>>It can be used as a stand-alone light system (as a normal dynamo) on
>>your bike, or used as a back-up for your existed battery-powered lights
>>
>>All details and buy on-line: http://www.freelights.co.uk
>>
 
S

Shaun aRe

Guest
"manuel borowski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> GWood wrote:
> > Ya know, I looked at this and it doesn't sound all that wacky. Except

for
> > the wiring strung around, it might be good for a commuter bike. I know

when
> > I rode my hardtail as a commuter, I always forgot to turn off the

flasher on
> > the seatpost.
> >
> > But to keep this within the realm of MTBs: Here's a crazy thought.
> >
> > If a magnetic field from a presumably tiny magnet can provide the energy
> > required for 2-3 LEDs. Why not magnetize disc rotors and use the larger
> > energies generated there for night lights? Or at least to trickle

charge
> > the larger batteries required for night riding? Seems kinda wasterful

to
> > have all that metal on a bike and use it only as a friction device to

slow
> > down wheels?


> So that each and every magnetizable dust particle will cling to it?
> Don't think that's such a good idea :)


Indeed - there's MUCH better ways, especially for disc-equipped bikes. i.e -
small, very powerful 'rare earth' (neodymium etc.) magnets hard glued to the
wheel braking surface (motorcyclists actually have been known to do this,
that is glue one to the brake disc rotor, to run a bicycle style
speedo/odometer from), quite close together, N-S-N-S all the way around,
both sides, even, double up again and go front and rear for even more
output). Have the gen. coil(s) attached to the fork leg(s), use this to
directly run LED's (half the LED's on one half wave, other half on the other
to give a reasonably steady light, or rectify with a diode bridge and use
this way, or use to trickle charge a battery.

Could even go a step further, and put a brake light switch in there, power
is only diverted to the battery(ies) when braking, so slowing down uses the
extra bit of drag on the wheel from the dynamo/generator set-up as well as
normal braking forces.

Dead easy to do really, shouldn't cost too much in magnets either.



Shaun aRe