A proposal for the America beef industry

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by William A. Noye, Dec 24, 2003.

  1. With the discovery of Mad Cow disease in a cow from near the town of Mabton, Yakima county,
    Washington State, this long predicted event has come to past. The impact will likely ripple through
    the economy for months if not years.

    Here is what needs to be done for next time.

    There should be regions within the nation that don't permit the importation of live beef from other
    areas. In order, to keep the beef free of BSE without much question. These regions would be the net
    growers of beef. Indeed, it might also make sense to have these areas not import any killed beef
    from other areas. This would be of benefit when Mad Cow rears its ugly head. That way the effected
    regions and marketing systems would include areas smaller than the WHOLE nation. And only part of
    the system would be held in doubt by the public. Such a structure would also help preserve
    international markets.

    With strict regional controls of beef growing, cattle movement, and meat marketing in place, Japan,
    S. Korea, and Taiwan would only be rejecting beef from the State of Washington or perhaps from the
    Pacific Northwest,. depending on the size of beef growth and market regions that I just proposed.

    I suppose the areas that are largely none beef raising areas could be "free trade zones".

    Now we are left with the question as to whether Mad Cow came from animal feed made in the last 6
    years or did it come from contaminate ground?
    ------------------------------------------

    What do you think? How would you limit the damage next time?

    The status quo has a price........... .......................William A. Noyes
     
    Tags:


  2. Rmp

    Rmp Guest

    Main problem was downed cow meat getting into the system. A ban on this did not pass th house.
    Obviously, due to lobbying by the meat industry. The greedy scumbag farmers deserve it.

    "William A. Noyes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > With the discovery of Mad Cow disease in a cow from near the town of Mabton, Yakima county,
    > Washington State, this long predicted event has come to past. The impact will likely ripple
    > through the economy for months if not years.
    >
    > Here is what needs to be done for next time.
    >
    > There should be regions within the nation that don't permit the importation of live beef from
    > other areas. In order, to keep the beef free of BSE without much question. These regions would be
    > the net growers of beef. Indeed, it might also make sense to have these areas not import any
    > killed beef from other areas. This would be of benefit when Mad Cow rears its ugly head. That way
    > the effected regions and marketing systems would include areas smaller than the WHOLE nation. And
    > only part of the system would be held in doubt by the public. Such a structure would also help
    > preserve international markets.
    >
    > With strict regional controls of beef growing, cattle movement, and meat marketing in place,
    > Japan, S. Korea, and Taiwan would only be rejecting beef from the State of Washington or perhaps
    > from the Pacific Northwest,. depending on the size of beef growth and market regions that I just
    > proposed.
    >
    > I suppose the areas that are largely none beef raising areas could be "free trade zones".
    >
    > Now we are left with the question as to whether Mad Cow came from animal feed made in the last 6
    > years or did it come from contaminate ground?
    > ------------------------------------------
    >
    > What do you think? How would you limit the damage next time?
    >
    > The status quo has a price........... .......................William A. Noyes
     
  3. Tcomeau

    Tcomeau Guest

    "William A. Noyes" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > With the discovery of Mad Cow disease in a cow from near the town of Mabton, Yakima county,
    > Washington State, this long predicted event has come to past. The impact will likely ripple
    > through the economy for months if not years.
    >

    http://msnbc.msn.com/Default.aspx?id=3797510&p1=0

    quote:
    **************************
    The Agriculture Department announced Tuesday that a so-called downed cow, meaning it was unable to
    move on its own, had tested positive for the brain-wasting disease. The cow, which came from a farm
    near Yakima, Wash., was slaughtered Dec. 9.

    Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman said parts of the animal went to three processing plants in
    Washington State. But she said there was no danger to the food supply because "muscle cuts of meat
    have almost no risk."
    **************************

    I wonder how common it is, in the American beef industry, to allow a downed cow to go into the human
    food supply? How many other downed American cows go into the human food supply on a regular basis?
    Is this not a dangerous practice? If the animal is diseased and becomes a downed cow, it still goes
    into the American food supply?!?

    The cow that was found in Canada went into pet food. It was never even close to going into the human
    food supply because it was a downed cow!!! And the Americans cast doubt on the Canadian beef
    supply!!!! And shut its borders to Canadian beef on this basis!!!

    I wil never eat American beef again!

    TC
     
  4. "tcomeau" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]gle.com...
    > "William A. Noyes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > With the discovery of Mad Cow disease in a cow from near the town of Mabton, Yakima county,
    > > Washington State, this long predicted event has come to past. The impact will likely ripple
    > > through the economy for months if not years.
    > >
    >
    >
    > http://msnbc.msn.com/Default.aspx?id=3797510&p1=0
    >
    > quote:
    > **************************
    > The Agriculture Department announced Tuesday that a so-called downed cow, meaning it was unable to
    > move on its own, had tested positive for the brain-wasting disease. The cow, which came from a
    > farm near Yakima, Wash., was slaughtered Dec. 9.
    >
    > Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman said parts of the animal went to three processing plants in
    > Washington State. But she said there was no danger to the food supply because "muscle cuts of meat
    > have almost no risk."
    > **************************
    >
    > I wonder how common it is, in the American beef industry, to allow a downed cow to go into the
    > human food supply? How many other downed American cows go into the human food supply on a regular
    > basis? Is this not a dangerous practice? If the animal is diseased and becomes a downed cow, it
    > still goes into the American food supply?!?
    >
    > The cow that was found in Canada went into pet food. It was never even close to going into the
    > human food supply because it was a downed cow!!! And the Americans cast doubt on the Canadian beef
    > supply!!!! And shut its borders to Canadian beef on this basis!!!
    >
    > I wil never eat American beef again!
    >
    > TC
     
  5. "tcomeau" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "William A. Noyes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > With the discovery of Mad Cow disease in a cow from near the town of Mabton, Yakima county,
    > > Washington State, this long predicted event has come to past. The impact will likely ripple
    > > through the economy for months if not years.
    > >
    >
    >
    > http://msnbc.msn.com/Default.aspx?id=3797510&p1=0
    >
    > quote:
    > **************************
    > The Agriculture Department announced Tuesday that a so-called downed cow, meaning it was unable to
    > move on its own, had tested positive for the brain-wasting disease. The cow, which came from a
    > farm near Yakima, Wash., was slaughtered Dec. 9.
    >
    > Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman said parts of the animal went to three processing plants in
    > Washington State. But she said there was no danger to the food supply because "muscle cuts of meat
    > have almost no risk."
    > **************************
    >
    > I wonder how common it is, in the American beef industry, to allow a downed cow to go into the
    > human food supply? How many other downed American cows go into the human food supply on a regular
    > basis? Is this not a dangerous practice? If the animal is diseased and becomes a downed cow, it
    > still goes into the American food supply?!?
    >
    > The cow that was found in Canada went into pet food. It was never even close to going into the
    > human food supply because it was a downed cow!!! And the Americans cast doubt on the Canadian beef
    > supply!!!! And shut its borders to Canadian beef on this basis!!!
    >
    > I wil never eat American beef again!
    >
    > TC

    Pet food is still not a good place for it. All cats are subject to prion dieases. This could be the
    native wasting disease found in both Canada and the lower 48 States. There is a very serious
    concern about the various native wild cats getting it and dieing. Dogs, wolves, coyote are immune,
    it is said. In theory, the spoon that serves the canned pet food would be a risk, depending on how
    it is washed.

    Then you will never eat ground beef again, TC, if you want to avoid American beef. Ground beef comes
    from nearly everywhere.

    Yes, the meat lobby is at fault. It didn't work for reasonable reforms when it had the chance.
    Rather, big beef spent its time passing what might be called "anti-Oprah laws"; Washington State has
    a "food libel laws" as I recall.

    ...................William A. Noyes
     
  6. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    tcomeau wrote:

    > I wil never eat American beef again!

    You should eat less beef and more complex carbs anyway. lol

    Come to think of it, if mad cow becomes a real problem and the beef industry get shut down in the
    US, especially the fast food shit beef. We would see a subtle spike is general health if people ate
    more fish and good old fashined healthy carbs. Maybe a blessing on the horizon.

    --
    Doug Freese "Caveat Lector" [email protected]
     
  7. "tcomeau" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "William A. Noyes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > With the discovery of Mad Cow disease in a cow from near the town of Mabton, Yakima county,
    > > Washington State, this long predicted event has come to past. The impact will likely ripple
    > > through the economy for months if not years.
    > >
    >
    >
    > http://msnbc.msn.com/Default.aspx?id=3797510&p1=0
    >
    > quote:
    > **************************
    > The Agriculture Department announced Tuesday that a so-called downed cow, meaning it was unable to
    > move on its own, had tested positive for the brain-wasting disease. The cow, which came from a
    > farm near Yakima, Wash., was slaughtered Dec. 9.
    >
    > Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman said parts of the animal went to three processing plants in
    > Washington State. But she said there was no danger to the food supply because "muscle cuts of meat
    > have almost no risk."
    > **************************
    >
    > I wonder how common it is, in the American beef industry, to allow a downed cow to go into the
    > human food supply? How many other downed American cows go into the human food supply on a regular
    > basis? Is this not a dangerous practice? If the animal is diseased and becomes a downed cow, it
    > still goes into the American food supply?!?
    >
    > The cow that was found in Canada went into pet food. It was never even close to going into the
    > human food supply because it was a downed cow!!! And the Americans cast doubt on the Canadian beef
    > supply!!!! And shut its borders to Canadian beef on this basis!!!
    >
    > I wil never eat American beef again!
    >
    > TC

    Support the Akaka Downed Animal Amendment!

    Senator Daniel Akaka's downed animal amendment to the Agriculture Appropriations bill will prohibit
    USDA inspectors at slaughter facilities from approving meat from non-ambulatory livestock for human
    consumption. The amendment is similar to the Downed Animal Protection Act (S. 1298 / H.R.
    2519), introduced by Senator Akaka and Representative Gary Ackerman. Both the amendment and the bill
    would encourage those handling livestock to treat them with greater care to prevent them from
    getting sick or injured, and will result in more humane handling of livestock that do become
    non-ambulatory. In the 107th Congress, the Senate and the House each approved provisions, as
    part of their farm bills, requiring humane euthanasia of downed animals at stockyards, auction
    houses and other intermediate markets, but this language was removed during the farm bill
    conference.

    . Downed animals suffer terribly. Animals too sick or injured to stand or walk are routinely
    pushed, kicked, dragged, and prodded with electric shocks in an effort to move them at auction
    and slaughter facilities, en route to slaughter. Downed animals may be left for hours or days
    without food, water, or veterinary care as they await slaughter. There is no excuse for this
    unnecessary torment.

    . Meat from downed animals is more likely to be unfit for consumption. It has an increased risk
    of bacterial contamination, and is at a high risk for other diseases. A 2001 study in Germany
    found that downed cows were 10 to 240 times more likely to test positive for Bovine Spongiform
    Encephalopathy (BSE or

    "mad cow" disease). The "mad cow" recently found in Canada was a downed animal, prompting the
    President of the Alberta Beef Producers to remark, "Cows too sick to walk, too sick to stand, have
    no business being part of the food system. This animal should never have left the farm." In January,
    USDA concluded that if BSE does occur in the U.S., it will most likely first be found among downed
    cattle. According to USDA, downed animals "represent a significant pathway for spread of disease if
    they are not handled or disposed of with appropriate safeguards."

    . A high proportion of downed animals are approved for human consumption under current USDA
    practice. USDA records from 1999-2001 indicated that 73% of downed animals passed inspection
    for human consumption, while just 27% were condemned. USDA records further show that, of those
    approved, many had gangrene, malignant cancer, pneumonia, or other serious illnesses. Data
    presented at a recent Livestock Conservation Insitute meeting showed that 14% of downed cows
    are Salmonella positive at time of slaughter, including one cow in the study that tested
    positive for Salmonella septicemia - a fatal affliction that kills about 1,000 Americans each
    year. That cow passed inspection and entered the food supply.

    . Only a small fraction of downed animals processed for human food are tested for mad cow
    disease. Approximately 195,000 downed livestock are processed every year in the U.S.,
    according to USDA. But the General Accounting Office reported in 2002 that only 48,000 downed
    animals had been tested for mad cow disease over the past 13 years combined, and USDA
    acknowledged in January that only 19,990 cattle samples were tested for mad cow disease in FY
    2002 (the year with the most such tests). USDA also noted that "downer cattle infected with
    BSE often cannot be found by looking for the typical clinical signs associated with BSE,
    because the signs of BSE often cannot be differentiated from the signs of the many other
    diseases and conditions affecting downer cattle. Thus, if BSE were present in the United
    States, downer cattle infected with BSE could potentially be offered for slaughter and, if the
    clinical signs of the disease were not detected, pass antemortem inspection. These cattle
    could then be slaughtered for human or animal food." Dr. Stanley Prusiner, who won the Nobel
    Prize for his discovery of BSE prions and is considered a foremost expert on mad cow disease,
    described the number of BSE tests conducted by USDA as "appalling."

    (please see reverse side.)

    . It's reasonable to expect farmers to act humanely and to protect public safety. Most
    producers already try to keep their livestock from getting sick or injured, and euthanize
    any that do become non-ambulatory while they are still on the farm. With proper disposal,
    this is the safest course, in order to prevent spread of infectious diseases among animals
    and transmission to humans through the food supply. USDA estimates that less than 1% of all
    cows processed annually are non-ambulatory. This legislation would most affect the small
    number of producers who are unduly subjecting downed animals to suffering and human
    consumers to health risks.

    . Testing for mad cow disease is best done at the farm, not the slaughter plant. In a USDA-
    commissioned study published in 2001, the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis emphasized that the
    key to keeping our meat supply BSE-free is dramatically increasing testing of animals that die
    on the farm, not at the point of slaughter. In fact, USDA already has a program set up to test
    sick animals at farms, but the program has been neglected. Some have argued that the downed
    animal legislation would inhibit testing for mad cow disease by inciting farmers to "bury the
    evidence" on their farms. But farmers have the most to lose by exposing their own herds to
    continuing risk of BSE contamination in the soil, and to having a mad cow outbreak shake
    public confidence in the U.S. food supply. Besides, this is just one small part of a much
    bigger issue - more than 1 million cows die or are killed each year before being sent to
    slaughter. How to dispose of this "dead stock" in the most safe and economical way is an issue
    that USDA is grappling with, as reflected in a Federal Register notice published on January
    21, 2003. While that broader question is being resolved, it makes no sense to continue feeding
    downed animals to American consumers in order to preserve a system that tests a tiny fraction
    of them for BSE at slaughter facilities.

    . Americans do not want to eat meat from downed animals. In September 2003, a Zogby poll
    revealed that 77% of likely U.S. voters oppose the use of downed animals for human food, and
    81% are concerned that sending downed animals to slaughterhouses could put human consumers at
    risk for mad cow disease. Reflecting this public concern, restaurants including McDonald's,
    Wendy's, and Burger King have pledged not to use meat from downed animals. The largest
    livestock markets in the nation, including Empire Livestock in New York and Central Livestock
    that serves the entire Midwest, have endorsed the removal of downed animals from human food,
    citing animal welfare and food safety concerns.

    . USDA instituted a policy in 2000 ending the purchase of beef from downed animals for the
    National School Lunch and Breakfast programs. This policy was triggered by USDA's recognition
    that downed animals pose an unacceptable food safety threat. While it's clear that
    schoolchildren deserve protection from unsafe food, so do all other consumers.

    For the sake of the animals, public health, and the long-run interests of the U.S. meat industry,

    it's time for Congress to ensure that meat from downed animals can no longer end up on someone's
    dinner table! Please support the Akaka amendment to Agriculture Appropriations.
     
  8. Hua Kul

    Hua Kul Guest

    "William A. Noyes" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > What do you think? How would you limit the damage next time?
    >

    I think the mainstream has no clue. I even heard a CNN anchor refer to the cause of mad cow
    disease as a virus. No microbe has ever been identified as the culprit. Even transmissibility has
    not been proven.

    Mark Purdy has done some fascinating research into mad cow and has uncovered strong evidence that
    the cause is a combination of a diet high in manganese combined with exposure of the animal to
    copper chelating organophosphate pesticides. This means it's not contagious. The beef supply is
    safe. Stop treating cattle with nerve gas derivatives and stop feeding them chicken shit (high in
    manganese). His research has been stomped on by a consortium of chemical and pharmaceutical
    manufacturers: "A lobby group that includes Bayer, Monsanto, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche and Schering-
    Plough was behind the effort to discredit Purdey. In December 1999, the same Dr. David Ray was
    appointed to the UK Veterinary Products Committee (VPC) -- a government body that licences animal
    medicines." http://www.gene.ch/gentech/2001/Oct/msg00106.html

    ========================================================================
    Misinformation on ‘Mad Cow' Disease Threatens America's Family Farms

    The truth about the cause of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly known as "Mad Cow"
    disease in England and, to a lesser degree, in France is not what you have probably heard about in
    the major media. And now, as concerns about the disease are spreading to the United States, many
    health experts contend that small American family farms may be subjected to destructive government
    regulations that are being promulgated on false premises in the name of fighting the disease.

    This was the topic discussed on the April 28 broadcast of Radio Free America, the weekly call-in
    talk forum with host Tom Valentine, sponsored by American Free Press. Joining Valentine were two
    guests, Sally Fallon and Mark Purdy.

    Miss Fallon is the founder and president of the Weston A. Price Foundation and publisher of
    Wise Traditions newsletter. For more information, see the foundation's web site at
    westonaprice.org or call
    (202) 333-4325 and request the free 12-page information packet that is available.

    Mark Purdy is an organic dairy farmer from Somerset, England, who refused to obey British government
    orders to spray his cattle with organophosphates, a chemical, in order to fight the warble fly.
    Purdy went to court to challenge the order and won. His farm was exempted from using the spray. When
    the "Mad Cow" epidemic hit England, not one cow in Purdy's herd developed the disease. Purdy has
    studied the issue and argues that Mad Cow is not caused by a virus, but is a result of organo
    phosphate pesticides and toxic mineral overload.

    What follows is an edited transcript of the interview. Valentine's questions are in boldface.
    Purdy's responses are in regular text. Miss Fallon's comments are in italics.

    Here in the United States, the media was full of hype about bovine encephalopathy, or "Mad Cow"
    disease, but you don't buy the official version of what causes it.

    Initially, I was very skeptical of the way the British government handled this thing. Foremost, they
    blamed it on the fact that cattle were fed with this meat and bonemeal ingredient. What I noticed,
    however, that this was actually sold all over the world, including the Middle East, South America
    and South Africa and there were cattle in those countries that never had a case of BSE.

    As an organic dairyman, do you use that kind of feed?

    It actually didn't go into organic feed in the early days, because you were allowed to use 20
    percent of the conventional feed as it was called. So organic farmers did get that feed. But what
    was interesting was that there was never a single case of BSE in a cow that had been bred on an
    organic farm.

    So it isn't necessarily the fact that animal parts are being fed back to an animal that eats grass
    that is the cause?

    No, I think this is a complete myth. There have been 40,000 cows in Britain that were born after the
    ban on meat and bonemeal, which was in 1998, and they have developed BSE. So how can the meat and
    bonemeal be the cause?

    Some of the other European countries have really over-reacted. Germany put down 40,000 cows just
    because of a problem in Bavaria with three herds. This is a massive overreaction for a disease that
    doesn't spread from cow to cow.

    Were organophosphates used on those three cow herds in Germany?

    Yes. However, there are two factors involved in this disease. It's a mineral imbalance caused by the
    feeding of an artificial milk powder, laced with the metal manganese. When an animal is young, it
    can't control the amount of manganese that's taken up into the brain. What happens is that the brain
    of a calf that's been fed on this milk powder is overloaded with manganese to a toxic level. In
    later life when this animal is treated with a chemical such as a phosphate chemical, it interacts
    with the manganese and changes it from a safe form into a lethal, chain-reaction type phenomenon.
    It's a bit like a nuclear meltdown in the brain.

    Humans have a problem with too much manganese. It can affect human babies.

    That's right. The soy infant formula is high in manganese and this is at a time when a baby has no
    protection against it. Mothers milk and cow's milk are very low in manganese and yet it is in the
    soy formula.

    I don't think people realize that baby calves are not given mother's milk. They are given what's
    called a "milk replacer," a formula for calves, and they deliberately make it high in manganese to
    get certain types of growth.

    So the combination of this pesticide to kill the warble fly and the manganese is what you believe is
    causing Mad Cow.

    This pesticide is so powerful that it is designed to penetrate the cow's skin and kill off the
    larvae of the warble fly that actually live inside the cow. They actually pour the pesticide on the
    back of the cow at the spinal cord, which is where BSE actually starts. This chemical's effect is to
    change the molecular shape of certain brain proteins that affect the nerves.

    Has your research had any effect on the British viewpoint?

    No, the British have such a reductionist mindset on this whole thing. Now, when I look at the humans
    who are dying of this disease, I think it's just scandalous. They will not look at any alternative
    theory that dissents from the government's theory.

    The government's theory has no evidence whatsoever, but this theory has a load of evidence. For
    instance, at Cambridge University—and you can't get any better than that—they did a cell culture
    study where they looked at a brain cell and bombarded it with manganese and took out the copper and
    this produced the exact abnormality found in the brains of animals that have died of BSE. Even
    though this was published in a prestigious journal, it was completely ignored.

    The Americans are being much wiser. When the warble fly comes out on the back of the cow, they use
    organophosphates but they use it as a water-based pour on, or as a powder. So it doesn't go through
    the skin and get into the spinal cord.

    The organophosphate pesticide is very economical, but the organic farmers I know don't want
    to touch it.

    It was never used in America on dairy cows because it can contaminate the milk, but in Britain we
    were using it at an exclusively high-dose rate.

    I'm sure this caused the massive epidemic of BSE. In fact, the government compelled the high dose
    rate. That's why they won't accept the alternative explanation, for it would point to the
    government's liability for massive damages.

    If your thesis is correct, then the more than 100 people who have contracted the human equivalent of
    BSE didn't necessarily all eat meat from a BSE cow.

    I think in humans it is the same sort of toxic template. If you look at the clusters of human
    infection in Britain, which are all in rural and coastal areas, not in towns, if it were a matter of
    beef consumption it would be spread more evenly.

    I've done environmental studies of these clusters and found very high levels of manganese. They're
    all high in oxidizing agents. A lot of the people in Britain who have provided me information
    indicate, for example, that their children have used head-lice shampoos which contain the same kind
    of organophosphates. So I think this is probably half of the problem.

    In addition, consider the possibility that some of these children affected may have also been
    brought up on soy-based formula.

    I think there is also a genetic element. A lack of copper in the body also seems to be a
    susceptibility factor.

    We get copper from animal foods: meat and seafood and so forth.

    Manganese is a necessary dietary element.

    But when it accumulates in the brain, that's when it is a problem.

    We Americans should not take this BSE thing for granted. The story that the U.S. Department of
    Agriculture is putting out is that animals that are outside are much more likely to contract these
    wasting diseases and I have a feeling that this is going to be used against small farmers and grass-
    based farms. We do need to be armed with the truth in regard to what is going on with this disease.

    The growing concentration in the American food industry is a real problem. We have four processors
    controlling 80 percent of the beef that goes to four companies that control 90 percent of the meat
    sales in America. Our Justice Department doesn't see a problem with this kind of monopoly. The
    situation is much worse than when Sinclair Lewis wrote The Jungle. The conditions in these packing
    plants are just horrendous. It all ties in to the BSE problem: the industrialization of livestock
    management, the use of heavy chemicals, inappropriate feeding and the use of milk substitutes.

    They want to raise the cows as fast as they can and as cheaply as they can. Human nutrition is never
    considered.

    However, the alternative system of grass-based farming is growing by leaps and bounds and I'm afraid
    that the beef industry is going to use the concern over BSE as a method to block the growth of the
    competition from grass-based farming.

    We recognize the need for some type of animal food in the diet, whether it is milk or meat, but when
    these foods move into the hands of the industry, they become denatured and we get inferior products.

    We want to get back to small farms and direct sales between farmers and consumers. In certain states
    they are already moving against small grass-based farms, such as the chicken farms in Mississippi.
    The big interests want chickens to be produced on industrial farms.

    Mark, do you drink your cows' milk?

    I've raised all of my eight children on my cows' milk and they are the picture of health.

    http://www.americanfreepress.net/Alternative_Health/21_Misinformation_on_Mad_Cow.htm
    ============================================================================

    --Hua Kul
     
  9. "tcomeau" wrote:
    > I wil never eat American beef again!

    Nor will I. (Or any other nation!)
     
  10. Mxsmanic

    Mxsmanic Guest

    tcomeau writes:

    > I wonder how common it is, in the American beef industry, to allow a downed cow to go into the
    > human food supply?

    As long as it is legal, you can rest assured that it happens every day. Cattle are worth a
    lot of money.

    --
    Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
     
  11. Mxsmanic

    Mxsmanic Guest

    William A. Noyes writes:

    > Then you will never eat ground beef again, TC, if you want to avoid American beef. Ground beef
    > comes from nearly everywhere.

    Alas! Ground beef is about the only kind of beef I can tolerate.

    --
    Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
     
  12. Once upon a time, our fellow Mxsmanic rambled on about "Re: A proposal for the America beef
    industry." Our champion De-Medicalizing in sci.med.nutrition retorts, thusly ...

    >tcomeau writes:
    >
    >> I wonder how common it is, in the American beef industry, to allow a downed cow to go into the
    >> human food supply?
    >
    >As long as it is legal, you can rest assured that it happens every day. Cattle are worth a lot
    >of money.

    Actually, the problem is that downed cows go to cow food supply.

    Just thought that you might want to know. :)
     
  13. Amanda

    Amanda Guest

    John 'the Man' <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Once upon a time, our fellow Mxsmanic rambled on about "Re: A proposal for the America beef
    > industry." Our champion De-Medicalizing in sci.med.nutrition retorts, thusly ...
    >
    > >tcomeau writes:
    > >
    > >> I wonder how common it is, in the American beef industry, to allow a downed cow to go into the
    > >> human food supply?
    > >
    > >As long as it is legal, you can rest assured that it happens every day. Cattle are worth a lot
    > >of money.
    >
    > Actually, the problem is that downed cows go to cow food supply.

    What about organic beef? Do these cos get fed like that too?

    I can't live without beef. I tried but I need some. Would organic beef be safe?

    >
    > Just thought that you might want to know. :)
     
Loading...