a question from a newbie

Discussion in 'rec.bicycles.rides' started by James Noll, Dec 13, 2004.

  1. James Noll

    James Noll Guest

    I am getting interested in getting back to bicycling as a form of excercise
    and recreation. I was told by a friend that is really into cycling that in
    order to really get a good bike, you need to spend just over $1000 with
    special seat and clothing and shoes, etc. Is this true? I am considering a
    "Road Bike" or perhaps a "Hybrid".

    Secondly, he told me that Giant is a good brand bike. I have never heard of
    them.

    Thirdly, what are some bike brands that dont require a huge investment, yet
    have features that make biking enjoyable, yet efficient?

    Thank you for helping a newbis...

    James
     
    Tags:


  2. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    > I am getting interested in getting back to bicycling as a form of excercise
    > and recreation. I was told by a friend that is really into cycling that in
    > order to really get a good bike, you need to spend just over $1000 with
    > special seat and clothing and shoes, etc. Is this true? I am considering a


    You will probably find that the clothes make riding more comfortable
    (and therefore more fun), but they're not required.

    > "Road Bike" or perhaps a "Hybrid".
    >
    > Secondly, he told me that Giant is a good brand bike. I have never heard of
    > them.


    They are a well-known and -respected bike brand, just as much so as
    Trek, Fuji, Specialized, and many others.

    >
    > Thirdly, what are some bike brands that dont require a huge investment, yet
    > have features that make biking enjoyable, yet efficient?


    Fuji has some nice entry-level road bikes in the $400 to $800 range.
    Which one you want really depends on how, where, and how much you ride.
    Ask your dealer about the League, Ace, Finest, and Touring models, and
    have him/her explain the difference, or go to their web site to get some
    basic information. Personally I would not recommend the League, because
    it has the shifters on the downtube rather than integrated into the
    brake levers, but it is the least expensive of those models and some
    people like downtube shifters, so you might want to consider it. I have
    a 2003 Fuji Touring which I love, but there are lots of great bikes out
    there, so take your time and figure out which one is best for you.

    >
    > Thank you for helping a newbis...


    Welcome to the sport!

    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
  3. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    Tim McNamara wrote:
    > "James Noll" <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >> I am getting interested in getting back to bicycling as a

    form of
    >> excercise and recreation. I was told by a friend that is

    really into
    >> cycling that in order to really get a good bike, you need

    to spend
    >> just over $1000 with special seat and clothing and shoes,

    etc. Is
    >> this true?

    >
    > Good grief NO! Not only are there many good new bikes

    available for
    > less than this, you can get a used bike for a whole lot

    less than
    > this. Used bikes are a pretty safe buy as there's not

    much that can
    > be hidden about their condition. Of the five bikes I have

    now, one
    > was bought new- the others I bought used and got excellent

    value for
    > my money. I would not recommend buying one at a garage

    sale or
    > consignment store unless you know what you are looking at

    and how to
    > fix them. A lot of bike shops sell used bikes that they

    have tuned
    > up.
    >

    I'm no expert, although 5 of my 7 bikes were bought used.
    The major problem Jim (the OP) will have is that he will
    need to find a knowledgeable friend so he can avoid some
    common pitfalls:

    1. Steel rims
    2. Frame damage, or parts frozen together (e.g.
    crossthreaded pedal, or handlebars that can no longer be
    raised.
    3. Bad fit
    (etc.)

    Most bike shops around here don't carry used bikes -- not
    worth the trouble.

    --
    Mike Kruger
    "So class, who can tell me how much of our genetic code we
    share with
    chimpanzees?" "Ooh, ooh, ooh, ooh! I know, sir!"
     
  4. James Noll wrote:

    >I am getting interested in getting back to bicycling as a form of excercise
    >and recreation. I was told by a friend that is really into cycling that in
    >order to really get a good bike, you need to spend just over $1000
    >

    I haven't bought or priced a bike in a long time, but this seems high to me.

    >with special seat
    >

    My "special" seat cost me 39.99 at Performance (Forte Classic). I have
    absolutely no complaints (that means it's a good seat - at least for me).

    >and clothing and shoes,
    >

    Not really needed. You may want some padded shorts (save some money and
    check out Performance shorts), but I've been wearing my cotton hiking
    shorts and t-shirts for years and years. (I've switched to bib knickers
    - padded cycling knickers - for winter. I got the cheap brand (see
    above) and I am very happy with them.)

    I've always worn plain "sneakers" (I now wear Teva sandals in warmer -
    not winter - weather) and I use clips and straps (cheap). No shoes or
    "pedal system" is needed. You can always put these things off and add on
    later if you feel the need.

    >etc. Is this true? I am considering a "Road Bike"
    >

    Bent over in drop handlebars.

    >or perhaps a "Hybrid".
    >
    >

    More upright with straight bars.

    That's a very basic choice you need to make.

    I've come to prefer the hybrid route, but that's a matter of personal
    choice.

    You can spend a lot of money trying to make the bike lightweight -
    shedding a pound or two - but I've always felt it more cost efficient to
    just shed those pounds off myself.

    >Secondly, he told me that Giant is a good brand bike. I have never heard of
    >them.
    >
    >

    That's a fine brand of bike

    >Thirdly, what are some bike brands that dont require a huge investment, yet
    >have features that make biking enjoyable, yet efficient?
    >
    >

    Buy it from a reputable shop and you'll have an efficient, enjoyable bike.

    >Thank you for helping a newbis...
    >
    >

    Latin? ô¿Ô¬

    --
    *****************************
    Chuck Anderson • Boulder, CO
    http://www.CycleTourist.com
    Integrity is obvious.
    The lack of it is common.
    *****************************
     
  5. Olebiker

    Olebiker Guest

    Giant builds a good bike for the money. Figure about $600 for a Giant
    OCR3, $25 each for a jersey, shorts, and gloves from Performance, $75
    for shoes, $75 for a good helmet, another $100 for pumps, seat bag,
    spare tubes, and tire levers. You're pretty close to $1,000. Don't
    buy a new saddle until you have tried the one that comes on the Giant.

    With this bike or a Trek 1000 you will be able to ride with anyone and
    not be limited by your equipment. It's amazing how much bike you get
    for the money these days.

    Dick Durbin
     
  6. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > Giant builds a good bike for the money. Figure about $600 for a Giant
    > OCR3, $25 each for a jersey, shorts, and gloves from Performance, $75
    > for shoes, $75 for a good helmet, another $100 for pumps, seat bag,
    > spare tubes, and tire levers. You're pretty close to $1,000. Don't
    > buy a new saddle until you have tried the one that comes on the Giant.


    If you want to hold off on the clothes and shoes for a while, you could,
    but the rest of this stuff should be considered semi-mandatory (though
    the seat bag could be replaced by a fanny pack if you want).


    > With this bike or a Trek 1000 you will be able to ride with anyone and
    > not be limited by your equipment. It's amazing how much bike you get
    > for the money these days.
    >
    > Dick Durbin
    >
    >


    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
  7. no spam

    no spam Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    James Noll <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I am getting interested in getting back to bicycling as a form of excercise
    >and recreation. I was told by a friend that is really into cycling that in
    >order to really get a good bike, you need to spend just over $1000 with
    >special seat and clothing and shoes, etc. Is this true?


    You can get some very nice used bikes for around $200. Add another
    $200 for a basic helmet, gloves, shoes, and basic cycling clothing.
    You don't need a special seat unless you have fit problems.

    >Secondly, he told me that Giant is a good brand bike. I have never heard of
    >them.
    >Thirdly, what are some bike brands that dont require a huge investment, yet
    >have features that make biking enjoyable, yet efficient?


    The 4 most popular brands of bikes in the USA are Trek, Giant, Specialized,
    and Cannondale. For efficiency, get a bike with lightweight narrow tires.
    Buy from a good shop that can size and fit the bike to you.
     
  8. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    "James Noll" <[email protected]> writes:

    > I am getting interested in getting back to bicycling as a form of
    > excercise and recreation. I was told by a friend that is really into
    > cycling that in order to really get a good bike, you need to spend
    > just over $1000 with special seat and clothing and shoes, etc. Is
    > this true?


    Good grief NO! Not only are there many good new bikes available for
    less than this, you can get a used bike for a whole lot less than
    this. Used bikes are a pretty safe buy as there's not much that can
    be hidden about their condition. Of the five bikes I have now, one
    was bought new- the others I bought used and got excellent value for
    my money. I would not recommend buying one at a garage sale or
    consignment store unless you know what you are looking at and how to
    fix them. A lot of bike shops sell used bikes that they have tuned
    up.

    As for clothing, I think cycling shorts are good for comfort. You can
    put a pair of regular shorts over those if you like. The rest of the
    clothing can be what you normally wear. At our club ride a couple of
    Saturdays ago, we had a guy turn up with cargo shorts, a sweater,
    running shoes on his commuting bike. He had no trouble going over 40
    miles on that bike and seemed to be having a lot of fun.

    > I am considering a "Road Bike" or perhaps a "Hybrid".
    >
    > Secondly, he told me that Giant is a good brand bike. I have never
    > heard of them.


    Giant is a Taiwanese brand and is the largest manufacturer of bikes in
    the world. "Giant" is their own label, but they build bikes to
    specification for Trek and many other labels. If the bike says "made
    in Taiwan" somewhere on the frame, it was probably made by Giant no
    matter whose sticker is on the down tube.

    > Thirdly, what are some bike brands that dont require a huge
    > investment, yet have features that make biking enjoyable, yet
    > efficient?


    The bike that you are most confortable on is going to be the most
    efficient for you, so try lots of bikes. For me that's a road bike,
    but for you it might be something else.
     
  9. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    "Olebiker" <[email protected]> writes:

    > It's amazing how much bike you get for the money these days.


    Yeah. "Cheap" bikes are much better than they used to be, although
    department store bikes are still mostly crap.
     
  10. "Olebiker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > $75 for a good helmet,


    FWIW, the Giro Torrent is a great helmet (well, it fits my noggin), and its
    price is $25. See:
    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/profile.cfm?SKU=17658&SRCCODE=2047. If
    you're just going with a helmet with the basic certifications -- all the
    ones you're going to find at a bike shop are going to qualify. Don't pay
    more unless it makes you significantly more comfortable.


    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    please substitute yahoo for mousepotato to reply
    Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
    Personal page: http://www.geocities.com/cpetersky/
    See the books I've set free at: http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
  11. "James Noll" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I am getting interested in getting back to bicycling as a form of

    excercise
    > and recreation.


    A friendly FYI to you -- you probably want to post this sort of thing, and
    other "miscellaneous" type questions over in rec.bicycles.misc.

    This newsgroup is for posting about rides -- event type rides, like riding
    in a century (100 mile or 100 km event) -- or touring.

    Oh, as long as I'm at it: rec.bicycles.tech is for mechanical questions,
    like, "why does my bottom bracket keep clicking" and long drawn out
    discussions about the merits of Campy parts vs. Shimano. If you are not that
    mechanically inclined or knowledgeable, it is my experience that people are
    generally very patient and helpful in rbt.

    Rec.bicycles.soc is a looney bin for the debating of the merits of helmets,
    ranting about the damage mountain bikes cause (or don't), and other social
    issues related to bicycling. Enter at your own risk.

    I don't go over to rec.bicycles.racing that much, but it's supposed to be
    about racing bikes, whether you're a fan, or you race yourself. I hear
    people are snobby over there, but what do I know.

    Finally, and alt.bicycles.recumbent is for people who like to pedal in a
    lounge chair position. As we all know, to ride a recumbent, you must be some
    combination of: male, over the age of 50, wear little round glasses, have a
    beard, have a small pot belly, be a (former) engineer, or have a TiG welding
    set in the basement.

    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    please substitute yahoo for mousepotato to reply
    Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
    Personal page: http://www.geocities.com/cpetersky/
    See the books I've set free at: http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
  12. James Noll

    James Noll Guest

    You all are so well informed and nice, geezze, thanks for all the help. It's
    nice to know that there are so many nice people out there that can help. I
    really am going to like riding, I can just tell. Just think, instead of
    watching a gagel of jerseys go by I can watch from the middle of a gaggel of
    jerseys as a bunch of humans go by... ;)
    Safe riding to you all and Merry Christmas!!!

    "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:D[email protected]
    > "Olebiker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > $75 for a good helmet,

    >
    > FWIW, the Giro Torrent is a great helmet (well, it fits my noggin), and

    its
    > price is $25. See:
    > http://www.performancebike.com/shop/profile.cfm?SKU=17658&SRCCODE=2047. If
    > you're just going with a helmet with the basic certifications -- all the
    > ones you're going to find at a bike shop are going to qualify. Don't pay
    > more unless it makes you significantly more comfortable.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Warm Regards,
    >
    > Claire Petersky
    > please substitute yahoo for mousepotato to reply
    > Home of the meditative cyclist:
    > http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
    > Personal page: http://www.geocities.com/cpetersky/
    > See the books I've set free at: http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
    >
    >
     
  13. At the entry level for good road bikes the dealer counts far more than
    the brand. A good Trek, a good Specialized, a Good Giant are very
    similar. Once you have the dealer, then ride the bikes for at least a few
    miles.

    Alan Acock
    "Olebiker" <[email protected]> wrote in news:1102960187.248286.252270
    @z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com:

    > Giant builds a good bike for the money. Figure about $600 for a Giant
    > OCR3, $25 each for a jersey, shorts, and gloves from Performance, $75
    > for shoes, $75 for a good helmet, another $100 for pumps, seat bag,
    > spare tubes, and tire levers. You're pretty close to $1,000. Don't
    > buy a new saddle until you have tried the one that comes on the Giant.
    >
    > With this bike or a Trek 1000 you will be able to ride with anyone and
    > not be limited by your equipment. It's amazing how much bike you get
    > for the money these days.
    >
    > Dick Durbin
    >
    >
     
  14. Pat Lamb

    Pat Lamb Guest

    Claire Petersky wrote:
    > "Olebiker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>$75 for a good helmet,

    >
    >
    > FWIW, the Giro Torrent is a great helmet (well, it fits my noggin), and its
    > price is $25. See:
    > http://www.performancebike.com/shop/profile.cfm?SKU=17658&SRCCODE=2047. If
    > you're just going with a helmet with the basic certifications -- all the
    > ones you're going to find at a bike shop are going to qualify. Don't pay
    > more unless it makes you significantly more comfortable.


    Ah, the joys of an LBS (local bike shop). Strangely, most of the
    catalogs have lots of expensive bike helmets. Few of my LBSs do -- they
    start out around $30, and there's hardly any over $75. I guess
    everybody who wants a $200 helmet knows they can order it cheaper.

    As Claire says, anything at a bike shop will work about equally well.
    On the fringe of significance, a 14 vent helmet is a couple degrees
    cooler than a 6 vent helmet. Is it worth another $5-10? It is to me
    when it's 95 and humid, but you'll have to decide for yourself. And I
    like white -- it's 1.7495238% more visible.

    Pat
     
  15. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...

    ....

    > cooler than a 6 vent helmet. Is it worth another $5-10? It is to me
    > when it's 95 and humid, but you'll have to decide for yourself. And I
    > like white -- it's 1.7495238% more visible.


    Except in fog and snow! But it's tough to find a quality yellow helmet
    <grin>.


    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
  16. "David Kerber" <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    > says...
    > ...
    > And I
    > > like white -- it's 1.7495238% more visible.

    >
    > Except in fog and snow! But it's tough to find a quality yellow helmet


    Which is why I have my white helmet festooned with reflective chartreuse
    stickers.

    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    please substitute yahoo for mousepotato to reply
    Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
    Personal page: http://www.geocities.com/cpetersky/
    See the books I've set free at: http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
  17. >On the fringe of significance, a 14 vent helmet is a couple degrees
    >cooler than a 6 vent helmet.


    Likewise, it is also warmer in winter temps! We always have a lot of sun, even
    on cold day, and that black helmet can make a difference!

    I guess I need two - winter black and summer white models.

    But, I never pay a lot for a helmet, usually get them at Nashbar sales and
    closeouts.

    Something like this (said I, fearfully showing a cheap helmet and awaiting the
    thrown daggers)

    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=91&subcategory=1045&brand=&sku
    =12144&storetype=&estoreid=&pagename=



    http://members.aol.com/dnvrfox
    (Family Web Page)
     
  18. Pat Lamb

    Pat Lamb Guest

    Denver C. Fox wrote:
    >>On the fringe of significance, a 14 vent helmet is a couple degrees
    >>cooler than a 6 vent helmet.

    >
    >
    > Likewise, it is also warmer in winter temps! We always have a lot of sun, even
    > on cold day, and that black helmet can make a difference!
    >
    > I guess I need two - winter black and summer white models.


    Good point! I wonder where my old, hot helmet is -- it was below
    freezing this morning! (First time below 30 this year, if I'm not
    mistaken.) Of course, it's still white.

    Pat
     
  19. Veloise

    Veloise Guest

    James, go looking for a local bike club too. It'll make your transition
    easier and more fun. They come in all flavors (racing, touring, ATBs,
    'bents...).

    --Karen M.
    Rapid Wheelmen
     
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