a question on fair prices...

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Paul Nevai, Apr 30, 2004.

  1. Paul Nevai

    Paul Nevai Guest

    Location: Columbus, Ohio, USA

    How much would be fair to charge [I mean that I would have
    to pay to a shop] for the following services.

    Repacking the front and rear hubs and the bottom bracket.
    Is $80 fair?

    Installing a pair of new STI shifters and taping the
    handlebar [I provide the shifters and the tape]. Is $40
    fair?

    BTW, is the repacking job necessary? My bike is 12 years old
    and has never been repacked. I took good care of it, rode it
    only on roads.

    Thanks, Paul
     
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  2. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

    Joined:
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    Repack after 12 years: yes it is "necessary".
    Were you told ahead of time what the repack jobs entails and how much labor time is put into it?
    What about parts? (bearings, cones, cups, etc.)
    If you were told ahead of time and you agreed, then it is "fair".
    The price seems high, but there may be more to the story.

    Installing customer provided items doesn't allow the shop to make anything on the product and puts them in a position of responsibilty for your parts.
    Did you agree to the price ahead of time?
    This price may seem high, but they likely did more than mount the shifters and wrap the tape.
    Did they remove the old stuff?
    Did they cable and adjust the new stuff?
    Did they warrant their work?
    How does it work? and how does it look?
    Frank and open discussion with the shop ahead of time is important for you and them. Most shops want customers to feel they got their money's worth and will return when you are considering service and upgrades.
     
  3. 2me-<< How much would be fair to charge [I mean that I would
    have to pay to a shop] for the following services.
    >><BR><BR>

    I'll tell ya what we charge-

    << Repacking the front and rear hubs and the bottom bracket
    >><BR><BR>

    If cup and ball BB-$20 for the BB, $20 for the rear hub, $15
    for the front-$55

    << Installing a pair of new STI shifters and taping the
    handlebar [I provide the shifters and the tape]. Is $40
    fair? >><BR><BR>

    $30 at our shop-

    << BTW, is the repacking job necessary? My bike is 12 years
    old and has never been repacked. I took good care of it,
    rode it only on roads. >><BR><BR>

    Yes, at least once per year, IMO-

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali
    costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  4. santa

    santa New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2004
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    Is it fair? How much do you make an hour? Estimate what your time is worth and how much aggravation it might cause you to try and fix it yourself and compare that to the price the bike shop wants to charge.

    You can also approach it another way. You could buy a bike repair manual ~$25, the necessary tools ~$75, and parts ~$25, and do it yourself now and in the future. Bike repair is not rocket science--you may even enjoy the satisfaction it brings you.
     
  5. Paul Nevai

    Paul Nevai Guest

    daveornee <[email protected]com> aszonygya:
    :Repack after 12 years: yes it is "necessary". Were you told ahead of
    :time what the repack jobs entails and how much labor time is put into
    :it? What about parts? (bearings, cones, cups, etc.) If you were told
    :ahead of time and you agreed, then it is "fair". The price seems high,
    :but there may be more to the story.

    These are fixed prices posted at the shop and I have not had
    the job done yet.

    :Installing customer provided items doesn't allow the shop
    to make :anything on the product and puts them in a
    position of responsibilty :for your parts. Did you agree to
    the price ahead of time? This price :may seem high, but
    they likely did more than mount the shifters and :wrap the
    tape. Did they remove the old stuff? Did they cable and
    adjust :the new stuff? Did they warrant their work? How
    does it work? and how :does it look? Frank and open
    discussion with the shop ahead of time is :important for
    you and them. Most shops want customers to feel they got
    :their money's worth and will return when you are
    considering service :and upgrades.

    I already removed the old stuff. Spent an hour removing the
    tape remnants. BUT BUT BUT many thanks for the suggestions.
    I will talk to them.

    Best regards, Paul
     
  6. Paul Nevai

    Paul Nevai Guest

    santa <[email protected]> aszonygya:

    :Is it fair? How much do you make an hour? Estimate what
    your time is :worth and how much aggravation it might cause
    you to try and fix it :yourself and compare that to the
    price the bike shop wants to charge.

    How much do I make an hour while I work or in my free time?

    :You can also approach it another way. You could buy a bike
    repair manual
    :~$25, the necessary tools ~$75, and parts ~$25, and do it
    :yourself now
    :and in the future. Bike repair is not rocket science--you
    may even enjoy :the satisfaction it brings you.

    Actually, I have all the tools and I repair my bikes myself.
    I also have about a dozen bike repair books.

    However, I have never doen any repacking and I want to leave
    it to professionals and I also don't want to do any job
    involving wire cutting [I am very bad at it].

    Anyway, I just wanted to know the fair price and I got a
    lots of excellent advice. I appreciate it.

    Best regards, Paul
     
  7. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 30 Apr 2004 21:23:05 GMT, [email protected] (Paul Nevai)
    wrote:
    >However, I have never doen any repacking and I want to
    >leave it to professionals and I also don't want to do any
    >job involving wire cutting [I am very bad at it].

    I can sympathize with the wire cutting; I cut it fine, but I
    never remember to terminate it so that it doesn't fray.

    But, bearing packing doesn't need to intimidate you. Go to a
    hardware store or Home Depot or an auto parts store and buy
    some grease; any kind will do, automotive wheel bearing
    grease is great. Take apart the bearings, clean off the old
    grease and crud, add a bunch of grease (not an exact
    science), and put back together. Replace balls if they've
    got lots of miles, replace anything that looks worn.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  8. Jay Beattie

    Jay Beattie Guest

    "Paul Nevai" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > santa <[email protected]> aszonygya:
    >
    > :Is it fair? How much do you make an hour? Estimate
    > what your
    time is
    > :worth and how much aggravation it might cause you
    > to try and
    fix it
    > :yourself and compare that to the price the bike shop
    > wants to
    charge.
    >
    > How much do I make an hour while I work or in my
    > free time?
    >
    > :You can also approach it another way. You could buy a
    > bike
    repair manual
    > :~$25, the necessary tools ~$75, and parts ~$25, and do it
    yourself now
    > :and in the future. Bike repair is not rocket science--you
    > may
    even enjoy
    > :the satisfaction it brings you.
    >
    > Actually, I have all the tools and I repair my bikes
    > myself. I
    also have
    > about a dozen bike repair books.
    >
    > However, I have never doen any repacking and I want to
    > leave it
    to
    > professionals and I also don't want to do any job
    > involving
    wire cutting [I
    > am very bad at it].

    Hey, I am all for people making a living, but re-packing a
    hub is Chimp-work, and unless you have no motor function in
    your hands, you should be able to do it yourself. Yes, I
    would have a mechanic do it if I got a huge Christmas bonus
    and was feeling particularly lazy and did not want to stain
    my Armani shop apron. I am all for people doing my grunt
    work, but for $80 -- man, that is steep for rumpus-room,
    T.V. watching kind of repair work. And re-packing the BB? Do
    you have one of them historical open-bearing BBs? Take it to
    the Smithsonian and then go buy a $25 cartridge bearing
    unit. They wear faster, but they are way convenient --
    especially if you live in a wet climate like me.

    As for the STI install -- same thing. Sub it out if you
    are feeling particularly rich and lazy, but it is really
    easy to do. Plus you need to get over the cable cutting
    phobia. Nobody who can find this NG and who likes bikes
    should be afraid to cut a cable. That is like being afraid
    of your shifters. As for the reasonableness of the quote,
    it works out to about $40 an hour. I would only charge you
    $20 and a six-pack in my basement shop, but then again, I
    am not open to the public -- and I do not take American
    Express. -- Jay Beattie.

    Jay Beattie Velo Not Open to the Public Everyday Since 1
    April 1971
    (p.s. where is Muzi?)
     
  9. Tcmedara

    Tcmedara Guest

    Paul Nevai <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Location: Columbus, Ohio, USA
    >
    > How much would be fair to charge [I mean that I would have
    > to pay to a shop] for the following services.
    >
    > Repacking the front and rear hubs and the bottom bracket.
    > Is $80 fair?

    Instructions off the internet, tube of grease, and a couple
    of cone wrenches will cost you under $20.00. Add a few more
    bucks if you need new bearings or cones.
    >
    > Installing a pair of new STI shifters and taping the
    > handlebar [I provide the shifters and the tape]. Is
    > $40 fair?

    Park cable cutters are under $25.00. If you can't cut a
    cable clean with those then you're not trying. Other than
    that what do you need but a few allen wrenchs and a
    steady hand?
    >
    > BTW, is the repacking job necessary? My bike is 12 years
    > old and has never been repacked. I took good care of it,
    > rode it only on roads.

    I'm no expert, but 12 years is probably on the extreme end
    for a hub overhaul. It really isn't hard to do.

    On another note -- in my opinion there's no such thing as
    "fair" pricing in a market economy. Unless Ohio has gone
    communist recently, I would assert that what's fair isn't
    the issue, but how to assess value. I suspect that if the
    LBS were willing to do the whole job for $3 (as unplausible
    as that sounds), "fairness" wouldn't be much of a concern.
    If you are willing to shell out the money for the services
    then, by definition, it's worth the money. Otherwise you'd
    do without. No one's forcing you to part with your money, so
    concepts of justice aren't all that relevent are they?
    Something is worth whatever YOU are willing to pay for it.
    That's a basic law of economics. Even the commies had to
    admit that one after a fashion.

    I figure you've got three options:
    1) Pay the money -- you get the service, confidence of a job
    well done, and savings of time and aggravation.
    2) Buy the parts and tools and DIY. You save cash, learn the
    process, and might find it personally rewarding. Cost is
    time, aggravation, maybe a few trips to the LBS when you
    can't find the bearings that roll of the table (hint --
    do it over an old towel).
    3) Do nothing. That saves you time, money, aggravation. It
    costs you functional shifters, tape, and increasing risk
    of failure in hubs and BB.

    You're the only one who can assign the appropriate values.

    Tom
     
  10. Ken

    Ken Guest

    [email protected] (Paul Nevai) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Location: Columbus, Ohio, USA
    >
    > How much would be fair to charge [I mean that I would have
    > to pay to a shop] for the following services.
    >
    > Repacking the front and rear hubs and the bottom bracket.
    > Is $80 fair?
    >
    > Installing a pair of new STI shifters and taping the
    > handlebar [I provide the shifters and the tape]. Is
    > $40 fair?
    >
    > BTW, is the repacking job necessary? My bike is 12 years
    > old and has never been repacked. I took good care of it,
    > rode it only on roads.
    >
    > Thanks, Paul

    Fair, is what the market will bear.

    Kenny Lee
     
  11. Nospam

    Nospam Guest

    "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Fair, is what the market will bear.

    Perhaps the OP should have written "reasonable" instead
    of "fair".

    We all know what he meant.
     
  12. Kenny Lee

    Kenny Lee Guest

    NoSpam wrote:
    > "Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    >>Fair, is what the market will bear.
    >
    >
    > Perhaps the OP should have written "reasonable" instead
    > of "fair".
    >
    > We all know what he meant.
    >
    >
    "Reasonable" is what the market says it is.

    Kenny Lee
     
  13. Kenny Lee <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Reasonable" is what the market says it is.

    sooo, what does the market say it is? how does this
    shop compare?
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  14. Paul Nevai

    Paul Nevai Guest

    David Reuteler <[email protected]> aszonygya:
    :Kenny Lee <[email protected]> wrote:
    :> "Reasonable" is what the market says it is.
    :
    :sooo, what does the market say it is? how does this
    shop compare?

    I am the OP and I swear I didn't mean to initiate any wars.
    I just wanted some piece of info. Best regards, Paul
     
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