A really dumb chili question?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Ruddell, Mar 22, 2006.

  1. Ruddell

    Ruddell Guest

    A short discussion with a friend left us without an answer and rather
    dumbfounded/shocked about chili. Where/when did the term 'con carne' first
    get dropped. Obviously, this is just to shorten the name but originally,
    there was a meaning to it and got even more meaningful as vegetarian dishes
    became more the norm (chili sin carne). I've searched a few sites/recipe
    books but found nothing with who actually shortened the name to simply chili
    (which means really nothing I think?). Wikipedia of course has an
    interesting page on it all but still leaves that one open.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chili_con_carne#Origins_and_history

    I'm sure most/many of us remember our mums making chili con carne when we
    were kids but today, nobody uses that term.

    Anyone?

    Yes, I know, I shouldn't worry about such things but that's my nature ;-)

    --
    Cheers!

    Dennis

    Remove 'Elle-Kabong' to reply
     
    Tags:


  2. dee

    dee Guest

    Ruddell wrote:
    > A short discussion with a friend left us without an answer and rather
    > dumbfounded/shocked about chili. Where/when did the term 'con carne' first
    > get dropped. Obviously, this is just to shorten the name but originally,
    > there was a meaning to it and got even more meaningful as vegetarian dishes
    > became more the norm (chili sin carne). I've searched a few sites/recipe
    > books but found nothing with who actually shortened the name to simply chili
    > (which means really nothing I think?). Wikipedia of course has an
    > interesting page on it all but still leaves that one open.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chili_con_carne#Origins_and_history
    >
    > I'm sure most/many of us remember our mums making chili con carne when we
    > were kids but today, nobody uses that term.
    >
    > Anyone?
    >
    > Yes, I know, I shouldn't worry about such things but that's my nature ;-)
    >
    > --
    > Cheers!
    >
    > Dennis
    >
    > Remove 'Elle-Kabong' to reply


    I think they use that term frequently in UK to refer to the stuff
    consists of red kidney beans/ mince meat/ and chili...
     
  3. Lefty

    Lefty Guest

    "Con carne" is Spanish for "with meat".

    Lefty
    --
    Life is for learning

    "Ruddell" <ruddell'Elle-Kabong'@canada.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > A short discussion with a friend left us without an answer and rather
    > dumbfounded/shocked about chili. Where/when did the term 'con carne'

    first
    > get dropped. Obviously, this is just to shorten the name but originally,
    > there was a meaning to it and got even more meaningful as vegetarian

    dishes
    > became more the norm (chili sin carne). I've searched a few sites/recipe
    > books but found nothing with who actually shortened the name to simply

    chili
    > (which means really nothing I think?). Wikipedia of course has an
    > interesting page on it all but still leaves that one open.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chili_con_carne#Origins_and_history
    >
    > I'm sure most/many of us remember our mums making chili con carne when we
    > were kids but today, nobody uses that term.
    >
    > Anyone?
    >
    > Yes, I know, I shouldn't worry about such things but that's my nature ;-)
    >
    > --
    > Cheers!
    >
    > Dennis
    >
    > Remove 'Elle-Kabong' to reply
    >
     
  4. Anthony

    Anthony Guest

    Ruddell wrote:
    > A short discussion with a friend left us without an answer and rather
    > dumbfounded/shocked about chili. Where/when did the term 'con carne' first
    > get dropped.


    According to The Oxford Companion To Food by Alan Davidson "It first
    appeared, with a slightly different spelling, in a book by S. Compton
    Smith entitled Chile con Carne, or The Camp and the Field (1857).
     
  5. Doug Kanter

    Doug Kanter Guest

    "Ruddell" <ruddell'Elle-Kabong'@canada.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > A short discussion with a friend left us without an answer and rather
    > dumbfounded/shocked about chili. Where/when did the term 'con carne'
    > first
    > get dropped. Obviously, this is just to shorten the name but originally,
    > there was a meaning to it and got even more meaningful as vegetarian
    > dishes
    > became more the norm (chili sin carne). I've searched a few sites/recipe
    > books but found nothing with who actually shortened the name to simply
    > chili
    > (which means really nothing I think?). Wikipedia of course has an
    > interesting page on it all but still leaves that one open.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chili_con_carne#Origins_and_history
    >
    > I'm sure most/many of us remember our mums making chili con carne when we
    > were kids but today, nobody uses that term.
    >
    > Anyone?
    >
    > Yes, I know, I shouldn't worry about such things but that's my nature ;-)
    >
    > --
    > Cheers!
    >
    > Dennis



    Cheers.

    Carne is Spanish for "meat", among other things. There's a clue.


    carne f
    1 flesh
    2 (alimento) meat: no me gusta la carne de cerdo, I don't like pork
    3 (de un fruto) pulp 4 carne de cañón, cannon fodder
    figurado familiar carne de gallina, goosepimples ? LOC: familiar ser de
    carne y hueso, to be only human
    en carne viva, (despellejado) raw: tenía los pies en carne viva, her
    feet were raw
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>,
    Ruddell <ruddell'Elle-Kabong'@canada.com> wrote:

    >
    > A short discussion with a friend left us without an answer and rather
    > dumbfounded/shocked about chili. Where/when did the term 'con carne' first
    > get dropped. Obviously, this is just to shorten the name but originally,
    > there was a meaning to it and got even more meaningful as vegetarian dishes
    > became more the norm (chili sin carne). I've searched a few sites/recipe
    > books but found nothing with who actually shortened the name to simply chili
    > (which means really nothing I think?). Wikipedia of course has an
    > interesting page on it all but still leaves that one open.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chili_con_carne#Origins_and_history
    >
    > I'm sure most/many of us remember our mums making chili con carne when we
    > were kids but today, nobody uses that term.
    >
    > Anyone?
    >
    > Yes, I know, I shouldn't worry about such things but that's my nature ;-)
    >
    > --
    > Cheers!
    >
    > Dennis


    Whatever happened to Chili con' queso? ;-)
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  7. Lefty

    Lefty Guest

    "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Ruddell <ruddell'Elle-Kabong'@canada.com> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > A short discussion with a friend left us without an answer and rather
    > > dumbfounded/shocked about chili. Where/when did the term 'con carne'

    first
    > > get dropped. Obviously, this is just to shorten the name but

    originally,
    > > there was a meaning to it and got even more meaningful as vegetarian

    dishes
    > > became more the norm (chili sin carne). I've searched a few

    sites/recipe
    > > books but found nothing with who actually shortened the name to simply

    chili
    > > (which means really nothing I think?). Wikipedia of course has an
    > > interesting page on it all but still leaves that one open.
    > >
    > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chili_con_carne#Origins_and_history
    > >
    > > I'm sure most/many of us remember our mums making chili con carne when

    we
    > > were kids but today, nobody uses that term.
    > >
    > > Anyone?
    > >
    > > Yes, I know, I shouldn't worry about such things but that's my nature

    ;-)
    > >
    > > --
    > > Cheers!
    > >
    > > Dennis

    >
    > Whatever happened to Chili con' queso? ;-)
    > --
    > Peace, Om.
    >
    > "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack

    Nicholson


    Chili con carne con queso con nata agriar con Corona con senorita con gusto.

    Always one of my favorite lunches.

    Lefty
    --
    Life is for learning
    The worst I ever had was wonderful
     
  8. guy klose

    guy klose Guest

    One day, in a small company cafeteria, a sign said "Chili con Carne (with beans)". A guy in front of me
    asked the cafeteria guy, "isn't that redundant? Chili 'with beans' with beans?" The cafeteria guy
    stared at me for a second (like, "what a dope") and then said "'con carne' means 'with meat', so it
    is chili with meat with beans." I added that chili started out as a stew of chilis, and meat was
    added later, but the guy's brain had already checked out.
     
  9. A year or two ago, I found out from the food network, that Chili is
    traditionally made with ONLY meat and chili peppers, NO BEANS AT ALL.

    http://www.chilicookoff.com/History/History_of_Chili.asp

    -Steven
    http://www.iamfood.com
    The World's Tastiest Database


    Ruddell wrote:
    > A short discussion with a friend left us without an answer and rather
    > dumbfounded/shocked about chili. Where/when did the term 'con carne' first
    > get dropped. Obviously, this is just to shorten the name but originally,
    > there was a meaning to it and got even more meaningful as vegetarian dishes
    > became more the norm (chili sin carne). I've searched a few sites/recipe
    > books but found nothing with who actually shortened the name to simply chili
    > (which means really nothing I think?). Wikipedia of course has an
    > interesting page on it all but still leaves that one open.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chili_con_carne#Origins_and_history
    >
    > I'm sure most/many of us remember our mums making chili con carne when we
    > were kids but today, nobody uses that term.
    >
    > Anyone?
    >
    > Yes, I know, I shouldn't worry about such things but that's my nature ;-)
    >
    > --
    > Cheers!
    >
    > Dennis
    >
    > Remove 'Elle-Kabong' to reply
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Lefty" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Chili con carne con queso con nata agriar con Corona con senorita con gusto.
    >
    > Always one of my favorite lunches.
    >
    > Lefty


    I think I got most of that. ;-)

    Chili with meat and cheese, beer and a beautiful woman.....

    And no I did not cheat and look it up.

    How'd I do? <G>
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>, guy klose <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > One day, in a small company cafeteria, a sign said "Chili con Carne (with
    > beans)". A guy in front of me
    > asked the cafeteria guy, "isn't that redundant? Chili 'with beans' with
    > beans?" The cafeteria guy
    > stared at me for a second (like, "what a dope") and then said "'con carne'
    > means 'with meat', so it
    > is chili with meat with beans." I added that chili started out as a stew of
    > chilis, and meat was
    > added later, but the guy's brain had already checked out.
    >


    With beans would be con Frijole's?
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  12. Ward Abbott

    Ward Abbott Guest

    On Wed, 22 Mar 2006 20:48:41 +0000 (UTC), guy klose <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >One day, in a small company cafeteria, a sign said "Chili con Carne (with beans)"


    Why wasn't the sign "Chili con Carne y frijoles"?
     
  13. Ward Abbott

    Ward Abbott Guest

    On 22 Mar 2006 13:23:02 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

    >A year or two ago, I found out from the food network, that Chili is


    Well,,,,,....I guess it has been written in STONE.

    Tell that one to someone from Cincinnati!
     
  14. nata agriar - sour cream?
    Lynn from Fargo

    con cebollas tambien
     
  15. Ward Abbott

    Ward Abbott Guest

    On 22 Mar 2006 13:38:42 -0800, "Lynn from Fargo" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >nata agriar - sour cream?
    >Lynn from Fargo
    >
    >con cebollas tambien


    We have lived on and off in Mexico since the late sixties.... I have
    never seen "sour cream" there...i.e. crema amarga. They still don't
    have adequate refrigeration for that! Go to Zacatecas or Yelapa and
    they don't know what you are talking about. If you are going to
    WalMart in Acapulco...that is an entirely different story.

    Sour Cream is something that Taco Bell put on their so called Mexican
    food.

    Onions/cebollas? what does that have to do with sour cream.
     
  16. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    Ruddell wrote:
    >
    > A short discussion with a friend left us without an answer and rather
    > dumbfounded/shocked about chili. Where/when did the term 'con carne' first
    > get dropped. Obviously, this is just to shorten the name but originally,
    > there was a meaning to it and got even more meaningful as vegetarian dishes
    > became more the norm (chili sin carne). I've searched a few sites/recipe
    > books but found nothing with who actually shortened the name to simply chili
    > (which means really nothing I think?). Wikipedia of course has an
    > interesting page on it all but still leaves that one open.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chili_con_carne#Origins_and_history
    >
    > I'm sure most/many of us remember our mums making chili con carne when we
    > were kids but today, nobody uses that term.
    >
    > Anyone?
    >

    The term is still in common use. Although the books I have refer to
    'carne con chile' which makes more sense.
    Chile is the red or green hot pepper that goes into making carne con
    chile.
     
  17. Lefty

    Lefty Guest

    You nailed it, esp. with the .....ending. Gusto means pleasure :)
    Lefty
    --
    Life is for learning
    The worst I ever had was wonderful



    "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Lefty" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Chili con carne con queso con nata agriar con Corona con senorita con

    gusto.
    > >
    > > Always one of my favorite lunches.
    > >
    > > Lefty

    >
    > I think I got most of that. ;-)
    >
    > Chili with meat and cheese, beer and a beautiful woman.....
    >
    > And no I did not cheat and look it up.
    >
    > How'd I do? <G>
    > --
    > Peace, Om.
    >
    > "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack

    Nicholson

    You nailed it, esp. with the .....ending! (Gusto means pleasure :)
    Lefty
    --
    Life is for learning
    The worst I ever had was wonderful
     
  18. Lefty

    Lefty Guest

    "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>, guy klose <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > One day, in a small company cafeteria, a sign said "Chili con Carne

    (with
    > > beans)". A guy in front of me
    > > asked the cafeteria guy, "isn't that redundant? Chili 'with beans' with
    > > beans?" The cafeteria guy
    > > stared at me for a second (like, "what a dope") and then said "'con

    carne'
    > > means 'with meat', so it
    > > is chili with meat with beans." I added that chili started out as a stew

    of
    > > chilis, and meat was
    > > added later, but the guy's brain had already checked out.
    > >

    >
    > With beans would be con Frijole's?
    > --
    > Peace, Om.
    >
    > How about ...con Frijoles Para Musica?


    Lefty
    --
    Life is for learning
    The worst I ever had was wonderful
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Lefty" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You nailed it, esp. with the .....ending. Gusto means pleasure :)
    > Lefty
    > --
    > Life is for learning
    > The worst I ever had was wonderful


    Via con' pollo...... <g>
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  20. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Lefty" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > How about ...con Frijoles Para Musica?
    >
    > Lefty


    ROFL!!!!!!
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
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