Aaaarrrgh...pinch flat



While _WALKING_ my bike up a flight of _THREE_ stairs in my _HOUSE_...

I've gotten so used to handling it with the loaded panniers and
handlebar bag (which according to the airport scale weighed the same as
the bike) over the last week that I was being somewhat more aggressive
than necessary with bouncing it up the stairs for the weight that was
present (or more precisely the weight that wasn't present) and it came
down on the edge of the stair just right to go *hisssssss* flat.

To make matters that much worse I'd been thinking the tire pressure was
rather low and as soon as I got the thing parked was planning to go
upstairs to get my pump and do something about it.

And tomorrow is one of those rare days when I actually need to use the
bike for transportation rather than play. Which means getting it fixed
at a street stall rather than the shop and that means I'll still be
having to do all the pumping by hand cause the guy across the street
doesn't have an adaptor for presta valves on his air compressor.

Meh.

-M
 
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] ([email protected]) wrote:

> While _WALKING_ my bike up a flight of _THREE_ stairs in my _HOUSE_...


If it's any consolation, which it almost certainly isn't, the P+nct+r+
Fairy visited my trike while it was being transported home in the back
of my car last weekend.

Odd, that.

--
Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
They came for Dani Behr; I said: "she's over there, behind the
wardrobe".
 
Perhaps a patch kit?

Do it yourself rahter than the street stall?
 
catzz66 wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
>> While _WALKING_ my bike up a flight of _THREE_ stairs in my
>> _HOUSE_...

>
> I had a rash of flats including pinch flats last summer until I
> started airing up my tires before every ride.


At more than 45 seconds a (prevented) pop?!?

Oh the hupumpity...
 
[email protected] wrote:
> While _WALKING_ my bike up a flight of _THREE_ stairs in my _HOUSE_...
>
>


I had a rash of flats including pinch flats last summer until I started
airing up my tires before every ride.
 
catzz66 wrote:
> Bill Sornson wrote:
>>
>>> [email protected] wrote:
>>>
>>>> While _WALKING_ my bike up a flight of _THREE_ stairs in my
>>>> _HOUSE_...
>>>
>>>

>>
>> At more than 45 seconds a (prevented) pop?!?
>>
>> Oh the hupumpity...
>>

>
> OP: "...I was being somewhat more aggressive
> than necessary with bouncing it up the stairs..." and "...I'd been
> thinking the tire pressure was
> rather low..."
>
> I don't guess it matters whether she was inside or out.


Oh fer gawdsake I was replying to (and agreeing with) YOU. Why did you snip
what YOU WROTE?!?

I'll type slowly: there was a thread recently (on here or tech) about
"bothering" to pump up tires before rides; most agreed it takes less than a
minute, soup to nuts.

Then the OP wrote the above.

YOU replied: "I had a rash of flats including pinch flats last summer until
I started airing up my tires before every ride."

So then, in unannounced SARCAMS (copyright?) mode, I wrote "At more than 45
seconds a (prevented) pop?!? Oh the hupumpity..."

Sigh.

BS
 
Bill Sornson wrote:
>
>>[email protected] wrote:
>>
>>>While _WALKING_ my bike up a flight of _THREE_ stairs in my
>>>_HOUSE_...

>>
>>

>
> At more than 45 seconds a (prevented) pop?!?
>
> Oh the hupumpity...
>


OP: "...I was being somewhat more aggressive
than necessary with bouncing it up the stairs..." and "...I'd been
thinking the tire pressure was
rather low..."

I don't guess it matters whether she was inside or out.
 
Bill Sornson wrote:
> catzz66 wrote:
>
>>Bill Sornson wrote:
>>
>>>>[email protected] wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>While _WALKING_ my bike up a flight of _THREE_ stairs in my
>>>>>_HOUSE_...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>At more than 45 seconds a (prevented) pop?!?
>>>
>>>Oh the hupumpity...
>>>

>>
>>OP: "...I was being somewhat more aggressive
>>than necessary with bouncing it up the stairs..." and "...I'd been
>>thinking the tire pressure was
>>rather low..."
>>
>>I don't guess it matters whether she was inside or out.

>
>
> Oh fer gawdsake I was replying to (and agreeing with) YOU. Why did you snip
> what YOU WROTE?!?
>
> I'll type slowly: there was a thread recently (on here or tech) about
> "bothering" to pump up tires before rides; most agreed it takes less than a
> minute, soup to nuts.
>
> Then the OP wrote the above.
>
> YOU replied: "I had a rash of flats including pinch flats last summer until
> I started airing up my tires before every ride."
>
> So then, in unannounced SARCAMS (copyright?) mode, I wrote "At more than 45
> seconds a (prevented) pop?!? Oh the hupumpity..."
>
> Sigh.
>
> BS
>
>


Bill, try decaf. =] This is the first pinch flat I've heard of that
occurred off the road. No offense meant or taken.
 
"Bill Sornson" wrote: (clip) I wrote "At more than 45 seconds a
(prevented) pop(clip)"
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
If typing more slowly is insufficient, maybe my blue pencil will help. The
interjection of "(prevented)" in your play on words may have broken the
rhythm enough to obscure the joke (good one, by the way.) I'll bet Marian
missed it.
 
catzz66 wrote:
> Bill Sornson wrote:
>> catzz66 wrote:
>>
>>> Bill Sornson wrote:
>>>
>>>>> [email protected] wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>> While _WALKING_ my bike up a flight of _THREE_ stairs in my
>>>>>> _HOUSE_...
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>> At more than 45 seconds a (prevented) pop?!?
>>>>
>>>> Oh the hupumpity...
>>>>
>>>
>>> OP: "...I was being somewhat more aggressive
>>> than necessary with bouncing it up the stairs..." and "...I'd been
>>> thinking the tire pressure was
>>> rather low..."
>>>
>>> I don't guess it matters whether she was inside or out.

>>
>>
>> Oh fer gawdsake I was replying to (and agreeing with) YOU. Why did
>> you snip what YOU WROTE?!?
>>
>> I'll type slowly: there was a thread recently (on here or tech)
>> about "bothering" to pump up tires before rides; most agreed it
>> takes less than a minute, soup to nuts.
>>
>> Then the OP wrote the above.
>>
>> YOU replied: "I had a rash of flats including pinch flats last
>> summer until I started airing up my tires before every ride."
>>
>> So then, in unannounced SARCAMS (copyright?) mode, I wrote "At more
>> than 45 seconds a (prevented) pop?!? Oh the hupumpity..."
>>
>> Sigh.
>>
>> BS
>>
>>

>
> Bill, try decaf. =] This is the first pinch flat I've heard of that
> occurred off the road. No offense meant or taken.


Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaccccccccccccccccccckkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkggggggggggghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh.

OK.
 
Colorado Bicycler wrote:
> Perhaps a patch kit?
>
> Do it yourself rahter than the street stall?


I have a patch kit. I have even practiced patching. However, I have
yet to become any good at patching and within 100 kilometers the patch
has inevitably come loose enough to be letting air escape again.

Current score in the last 3000 miles:
front tire - 2 pinches
rear tire - 3 pinches, 4 punctures, 2 badly patched by me, 1 faulty
valve

I can't do a whole lot about the punctures (other than, perhaps, not
ride my bike in Guangdong since 3 of the 4 happened in that province),
or the bad valve (though the shop replaced that tube for me free of
charge) but it is especially humbling that this flat which was caused
by low pressure came at a time when I KNEW my tires were low and was
already planning to get the pump and do something about it. I was
already in the downstairs hallway, I just needed to park my bike and go
upstairs!

-M
 
In article <[email protected]>,
"[email protected]" <[email protected]> writes:
>
> Colorado Bicycler wrote:
>> Perhaps a patch kit?
>>
>> Do it yourself rahter than the street stall?

>
> I have a patch kit. I have even practiced patching. However, I have
> yet to become any good at patching and within 100 kilometers the patch
> has inevitably come loose enough to be letting air escape again.


I've come to the conclusion that for in-the-field repairs it's best to
just replace the punctured tube with a new or previously repaired tube,
take the punctured tube home, and patch it there. Patches seem to fare
better when they get (or at least, the cement gets) some post-op rest &
recovery time before being put to work.

I really prefer to do patching while comfortably indoors, seated on
a proper chair, with a table to put stuff on where it won't get lost,
and with controllable lighting. These are the conditions I find most
conducive to successful patching jobs.

After a number of patched tubes have been accumulated, it's possible
to rotate through them, like the old grandfather-father-son computer
tape backup regimen. So one gets usable tubes in the tires, a usable
spare tube or two to take along, and more usable spare tubes at home.


cheers,
Tom

--
-- Nothing is safe from me.
Above address is just a spam midden.
I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
 
Tom Keats wrote:
> I've come to the conclusion that for in-the-field repairs it's best to
> just replace the punctured tube with a new or previously repaired tube,
> take the punctured tube home, and patch it there. Patches seem to fare
> better when they get (or at least, the cement gets) some post-op rest &
> recovery time before being put to work.


I heartily agree. That's my usual SOP, too. The few times I've been
forced to try to patch at the side of the road have not been
particularly stellar -- generally requiring me to pump up every few km.

I try to carry three 'known good' tubes when I take my short (1 week)
tours. Natually, the better prepared you are to handle a flat, the less
likely you are to *have* a flat.h
 
Brian Huntley wrote:
> Tom Keats wrote:
> > I've come to the conclusion that for in-the-field repairs it's best to
> > just replace the punctured tube with a new or previously repaired tube,
> > take the punctured tube home, and patch it there. Patches seem to fare
> > better when they get (or at least, the cement gets) some post-op rest &
> > recovery time before being put to work.

>
> I heartily agree. That's my usual SOP, too. The few times I've been
> forced to try to patch at the side of the road have not been
> particularly stellar -- generally requiring me to pump up every few km.
>
> I try to carry three 'known good' tubes when I take my short (1 week)
> tours. Natually, the better prepared you are to handle a flat, the less
> likely you are to *have* a flat.h


You'd think... but ever since I started learning proper techniques (per
this group's recommendation) such as checking inflation, how to use
tire irons, and how to patch, my number of flats have shot dramatically
UPWARDS.

First 1000 miles - 2 pinch flats (simultaneously from the same dumb ass
manuever in broad daylight)
Second 1000 miles - 2 pinch flats (one on fresh inflated new tires, one
at night)
Third 1000 miles - 1 pinch flat, 4 punctures, 1 faulty valve, and 2
mis-patches.

And all of those have happened in the last month! Either in the prep
for my first tour, during my tour, or after.

I had no flats in the 6 weeks (stolen) that I had my first road bike.
I had no flats during the 3 months (stolen) I had my first Chinese road
bike.
In the nearly 6 months (sold) I had my second Chinese road bike I got
two flats in the last week of owning it.
In the nearly 3 months I've had this bike I've had more mileage than
those three bikes put together (and much skinnier tires) so I'd sort of
expect more flats but still ... I'm getting a huge number ever since
learning how to do something about it.

-M
 
[email protected] wrote:
>
> You'd think... but ever since I started learning proper techniques (per
> this group's recommendation) such as checking inflation, how to use
> tire irons, and how to patch, my number of flats have shot dramatically
> UPWARDS.
>
> First 1000 miles - 2 pinch flats (simultaneously from the same dumb ass
> manuever in broad daylight)
> Second 1000 miles - 2 pinch flats (one on fresh inflated new tires, one
> at night)
> Third 1000 miles - 1 pinch flat, 4 punctures, 1 faulty valve, and 2
> mis-patches.
>
> And all of those have happened in the last month! Either in the prep
> for my first tour, during my tour, or after.
>
> I had no flats in the 6 weeks (stolen) that I had my first road bike.
> I had no flats during the 3 months (stolen) I had my first Chinese road
> bike.
> In the nearly 6 months (sold) I had my second Chinese road bike I got
> two flats in the last week of owning it.
> In the nearly 3 months I've had this bike I've had more mileage than
> those three bikes put together (and much skinnier tires) so I'd sort of
> expect more flats but still ... I'm getting a huge number ever since
> learning how to do something about it.
>
> -M


I think that many (most?) of us have experienced flats in clusters. I
have no idea if that is a result of some random process or not. I seem
to get flats in clusters of three and then no problems for a long time,
repeat cycle, repeat etc.
 
[email protected] wrote:
> Colorado Bicycler wrote:
>
>>Perhaps a patch kit?
>>
>>Do it yourself rahter than the street stall?

>
>
> I have a patch kit. I have even practiced patching. However, I have
> yet to become any good at patching and within 100 kilometers the patch
> has inevitably come loose enough to be letting air escape again.
>
> Current score in the last 3000 miles:
> front tire - 2 pinches
> rear tire - 3 pinches, 4 punctures, 2 badly patched by me, 1 faulty
> valve


One thing that might help, your patching, is carry a spare tube, when
you get a puncture, or even a pinch, swap the tubes, ALWAYS check inside
the tire rim to make sure that whatever caused the puncture or pinch is
no longer present. Now you have a good tube, and a flat spare... At the
first convenient point, patch the spare, then give it 24hours to cure,
then pack the spare away, it's now your working spare. When you get the
next puncture, you again swap tubes, just now your patched spare, is the
tube installed. With a pinch, you need to make sure the patch covers
both holes.... Considering that pinches are preventable, that's the
best solution.....

W