Abnormally High Triglyceride Levels

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Lib, Dec 20, 2003.

  1. Lib

    Lib Guest

    I received my results from my cholesterol panel:

    HDL is 22 LDL is unknown TRIGLYCERIDES 1,165

    My doc said that the triglyceride levels are so high, that it obscured my LDL reading. She has
    prescribed to me "Tricor."

    I am a non steroid using body builder and jogger/runner. I run two miles every other day and weight
    lift six days a week. I do not use supplements, except a store bought multivitamin. I am 31 years
    old Hispanic male, weigh 235 lbs at 5'8", but my body fat is approximately 11-12%, which I had
    measured through hydrostatic weighing. I have been exercising since I was 14 years old.

    There is a history of diabetes type 1 on my maternal side and a history of thyroid cancer on my
    fathers side.

    I am at a loss to what the problem could be and my doctor just wants me to take the prescription
    medicine but doesn't have an answer to what is causing this. Is there anyone out there with a
    suggestion on possible causes, any specialists I should see or any other tests I should take?
     
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  2. Lib wrote:

    > I received my results from my cholesterol panel:
    >
    > HDL is 22 LDL is unknown TRIGLYCERIDES 1,165
    >
    > My doc said that the triglyceride levels are so high, that it obscured my LDL reading. She has
    > prescribed to me "Tricor."
    >
    > I am a non steroid using body builder and jogger/runner. I run two miles every other day and
    > weight lift six days a week. I do not use supplements, except a store bought multivitamin. I am 31
    > years old Hispanic male, weigh 235 lbs at 5'8", but my body fat is approximately 11-12%, which I
    > had measured through hydrostatic weighing.

    Then, you are carrying about 25-28 pounds of fat.

    > I have been exercising since I was 14 years old.
    >
    > There is a history of diabetes type 1 on my maternal side and a history of thyroid cancer on my
    > fathers side.
    >
    > I am at a loss to what the problem could be

    It is likely that you are genetically predisposed to elevated triglycerides especially when you
    carry extra pounds of fat.

    > and my doctor just wants me to take the prescription medicine but doesn't have an answer to what
    > is causing this.

    Your predisposition for elevated triglycerides likely reside in your genes.

    > Is there anyone out there with a suggestion on possible causes, any specialists I should see or
    > any other tests I should take?

    Your thyroid should also be checked given your family history and this gland's potential effect on
    triglycerides.

    You should also ask your doctor about the 2PD approach since you may be carrying more fat than your
    body will safely allow:

    http://www.heartmdphd.com/wtloss.asp

    Humbly,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/
     
  3. Steve

    Steve Guest

    On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 10:01:02 -0500, Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD wrote
    (in message <[email protected]>):

    > You should also ask your doctor about the 2PD approach since you may be carrying more fat than
    > your body will safely allow:
    >
    > http://www.heartmdphd.com/wtloss.asp

    And while your are at it, you might also ask your doctor to check out the 2FD approach. It is based
    on Dr. Chung's diet, has the same scientific backing and published results, but is a bit easier to
    follow. I developed the Two Foot Diet approach (2FD) as a replacement for Dr. Chung's Amazing Logic
    Defying Two Pound Diet to avoid having to carry a scale around.

    Inspired by Dr. Chung's scientific approach, as described on his website, in 2003, my wife and I
    attended an IMAX film about climbing the Bavarian Alps and learned that despite their exhausting
    regimen, the climbers consumed only 10 packages of wieners per week. That's less than 2 feet of
    wieners per day! Since none of the climbers died from starvation, I think it is safe to assume that
    2 feet of food per day should be more than adequate for us non-climbing folks.

    So I started a little experiment with the agreeable obese friends in my neighborhood. I gave them
    ordinary 6 inch rulers with instructions to measure the length of everything substantial that passed
    into their mouths. The only things exempted were water and sugar-free drinks. What I learned was
    that my obese friends were consuming between 8 to 12 feet of food per day! At the time, I was about
    10 lbs. over my ideal body weight so I decided to find out how much I was eating per day... 3 feet.
    I cut back to less than 2 feet and was at my proper weight in one month.

    My friends have responded similarly except they have taken longer because of having to lose more
    weight. Admittedly, some of my obese friends were especially slow to respond. They also happen to be
    the ones with an unfortunate propensity for accidentally loosing their 6 inch rulers and taking
    weeks to buy replacements.

    So here's the deal: measure all the food you eat, using it's longest dimension, and keep the
    total length to less than two feet per day. That's all there is. No scales, no counting calories
    or carbohydrates. Heck, if you loose your ruler, you can even use the first joint of your thumb
    to measure.

    I am making this diet available as a public service and without compensation.

    If you have any questions, just see Dr. Chung's helpful FAQ and substitute "Two Feet" for "Two
    Pounds" everywhere... what could be simpler?

    "If I have seen farther than others, it is because I have stood on the shoulders of midgets"

    --
    "Beware of practicing your piety before men in order to be seen by them; for then you will have no
    reward from your Father who is in heaven." (Mat 6:1)

    Steve
     
  4. Your body fat is excellent. Your HDL level is dangerously low. A
    high carb diet can contribute to high trig. See
    http://www.mercola.com/2003/oct/25/carbs_triglycerides.htm

    I'd suggest getting a Hba1c test to rule out diabetes or metabolic syndrome. Also, consider
    increasing your running mileage. You might ask your doc about fish oil supplements and niaspan. Is
    your blood pressure ok?

    [email protected] (Lib) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I received my results from my cholesterol panel:
    >
    > HDL is 22 LDL is unknown TRIGLYCERIDES 1,165
    >
    > My doc said that the triglyceride levels are so high, that it obscured my LDL reading. She has
    > prescribed to me "Tricor."
    >
    > I am a non steroid using body builder and jogger/runner. I run two miles every other day and
    > weight lift six days a week. I do not use supplements, except a store bought multivitamin. I am 31
    > years old Hispanic male, weigh 235 lbs at 5'8", but my body fat is approximately 11-12%, which I
    > had measured through hydrostatic weighing. I have been exercising since I was 14 years old.
    >
    > There is a history of diabetes type 1 on my maternal side and a history of thyroid cancer on my
    > fathers side.
    >
    > I am at a loss to what the problem could be and my doctor just wants me to take the prescription
    > medicine but doesn't have an answer to what is causing this. Is there anyone out there with a
    > suggestion on possible causes, any specialists I should see or any other tests I should take?
     
  5. Steve <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected].net>...
    > On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 10:01:02 -0500, Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD wrote (in message
    > <[email protected]>):
    >
    > > You should also ask your doctor about the 2PD approach since you may be carrying more fat than
    > > your body will safely allow:
    > >
    > > http://www.heartmdphd.com/wtloss.asp
    >
    > <humorous parody of http://www.heartmdphd.com/wtloss.asp snipped>

    Thank you, neighbor, for the flattery implied by your reaction.

    Humbly,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/
     
  6. Steve

    Steve Guest

    On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 13:58:10 -0500, Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD wrote
    (in message <[email protected]>):

    > Steve <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >> On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 10:01:02 -0500, Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD wrote (in message
    >> <[email protected]>):
    >>
    >>> You should also ask your doctor about the 2PD approach since you may be carrying more fat than
    >>> your body will safely allow:
    >>>
    >>> http://www.heartmdphd.com/wtloss.asp
    >>
    >> <humorous parody of http://www.heartmdphd.com/wtloss.asp snipped>
    >
    > Thank you, neighbor, for the flattery implied by your reaction.

    (Whoa! I get it...deja vu all over again :) )

    You're welcome, neighbor... parody is only humorous if it is true :)

    I agree the 2PD is a real chuckle-flusher in and of itself... I love the Imax story... and am glad
    you have no hard feelings about me piggy-backing on it. Actually, I'm nominating the 2PD as the Best
    Web Joke of 2003. I know you are Humble and hope you won't have any problem accepting the award
    should you get it.

    --
    "Beware of practicing your piety before men in order to be seen by them; for then you will have no
    reward from your Father who is in heaven." (Mat 6:1)

    Steve
     
  7. Bob Pastorio

    Bob Pastorio Guest

    Steve wrote:

    > On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 13:58:10 -0500, Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD wrote (in message
    > <[email protected]>):
    >
    >
    >>Steve <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:<[email protected]>...
    >>
    >>>On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 10:01:02 -0500, Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD wrote (in message
    >>><[email protected]>):
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>You should also ask your doctor about the 2PD approach since you may be carrying more fat than
    >>>>your body will safely allow:
    >>>>
    >>>>http://www.heartmdphd.com/wtloss.asp
    >>>
    >>><humorous parody of http://www.heartmdphd.com/wtloss.asp snipped>
    >>
    >>Thank you, neighbor, for the flattery implied by your reaction.
    >
    > (Whoa! I get it...deja vu all over again :) )

    Note the brand-new addition of "humorous" to his macro library. I bet it's his way of chuckling,
    punching you in the shoulder in that male-bonding way and signaling that you're just buddies sharing
    a joke together. But that he's still in charge with that flattery thing.

    He can't seem to grasp the difference between imitation and parody. Like not sensing the distinction
    between dressing like someone and hooting laughter while pointing at their clothing.

    Pastorio

    > You're welcome, neighbor... parody is only humorous if it is true :)
    >
    > I agree the 2PD is a real chuckle-flusher in and of itself... I love the Imax story... and am glad
    > you have no hard feelings about me piggy-backing on it. Actually, I'm nominating the 2PD as the
    > Best Web Joke of 2003. I know you are Humble and hope you won't have any problem accepting the
    > award should you get it.
     
  8. Lib

    Lib Guest

    Thank you for your advice. I will read into this.
     
  9. Lib

    Lib Guest

    [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Your body fat is excellent. Your HDL level is dangerously low. A high carb diet can contribute to
    > high trig. See http://www.mercola.com/2003/oct/25/carbs_triglycerides.htm
    >
    > I'd suggest getting a Hba1c test to rule out diabetes or metabolic syndrome. Also, consider
    > increasing your running mileage. You might ask your doc about fish oil supplements and niaspan. Is
    > your blood pressure ok?

    Thank you for your advice. My blood pressure is in the normal range. What is niaspan?

    I try to eat a balanced diet, not too much starches. I received my
    B.S. in dietetics and biochemistry but my memory in these subjects have not been put into use for
    more than a few years. (I wish I didn't sell my textbooks back to the bookstore either!)

    Anyway, I was thinking about drastically reducing or perhaps eliminating carbohydrates in my diet,
    but wonder if this will help or create more problems.

    I decided to take another cholesterol panel today (after a 14 hour fast) just to make sure the
    previous test isn't a fluke. A different doc I talk to before the blood draw took a look at my
    previous results and noticed that my liver enzymes were also high.
     
  10. You're welcome. Glad your BP is normal. You may not have metabolic
    syndrome. Niaspan is a prescription form of niacin that causes less
    flushing. niacin/niaspan increases HDL. see www.niaspan.com for more
    info. Re: nutrition - a lot has changed in the last five years. Fats
    aren't the culprit any more, olive oil and other unsaturated fats are
    healthy. Unrefined carbs, added sugars, and white potatoes are the
    chief villans according to the Harvard School of Public Health. You
    many be able to reduce trig somewhat and raise HDL by using olive oil
    in place of carbs. See http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/

    [email protected] (Lib) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > [email protected] (Brad Sheppard) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Your body fat is excellent. Your HDL level is dangerously low. A high carb diet can contribute
    > > to high trig. See http://www.mercola.com/2003/oct/25/carbs_triglycerides.htm
    > >
    > > I'd suggest getting a Hba1c test to rule out diabetes or metabolic syndrome. Also, consider
    > > increasing your running mileage. You might ask your doc about fish oil supplements and niaspan.
    > > Is your blood pressure ok?
    >
    >
    > Thank you for your advice. My blood pressure is in the normal range. What is niaspan?
    >
    > I try to eat a balanced diet, not too much starches. I received my
    > B.S. in dietetics and biochemistry but my memory in these subjects have not been put into use for
    > more than a few years. (I wish I didn't sell my textbooks back to the bookstore either!)
    >
    > Anyway, I was thinking about drastically reducing or perhaps eliminating carbohydrates in my diet,
    > but wonder if this will help or create more problems.
    >
    > I decided to take another cholesterol panel today (after a 14 hour fast) just to make sure the
    > previous test isn't a fluke. A different doc I talk to before the blood draw took a look at my
    > previous results and noticed that my liver enzymes were also high.
     
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