accident statistics: car vs motorcycle vs bicycle per mile travelled?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by [email protected], Jun 6, 2008.

  1. I am wondering if riding a bicycle is safer than riding a motorcycle,
    per mile traveled. Has anyone come across a reliable statistics on
    this?

    I was considering to sell my car and to buy a motorcycle to save on
    gas on longer trips. Then I came across a statistics saying that a
    motorcyclist is 15 (or smth like that) times more likely to get killed
    than a car driver, per mile traveled. So I figured the gas is not
    worth it. But then I figured, perhaps me riding my bicycle to work
    could be statistically even more dangerous (not that I care).
     
    Tags:


  2. peter

    peter Guest

    On Jun 6, 10:20 pm, "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I am wondering if riding a bicycle is safer than riding a motorcycle,
    > per mile traveled. Has anyone come across a reliable statistics on
    > this?
    >
    > I was considering to sell my car and to buy a motorcycle to save on
    > gas on longer trips. Then I came across a statistics saying that a
    > motorcyclist is 15 (or smth like that) times more likely to get killed
    > than a car driver, per mile traveled. So I figured the gas is not
    > worth it. But then I figured, perhaps me riding my bicycle to work
    > could be statistically even more dangerous (not that I care).


    Unfortunately good statistics on bicycle usage are rather hard to
    find. Although getting a bit dated, the discussion at:
    http://www.kenkifer.com/bikepages/health/risks.htm
    is still a good summary. In general most studies seem to indicate
    that cycling is a bit more dangerous than car driving *per mile* and a
    bit less dangerous when figured *per hour*. Motorcycling is far more
    dangerous by either measure. [One confounding factor is that the
    people who take up motorcycling are more likely to be risk-takers and
    might have a higher rate of accidents than average in other vehicles
    as well.]
     
  3. landotter

    landotter Guest

    On Jun 7, 12:20 am, "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I am wondering if riding a bicycle is safer than riding a motorcycle,
    > per mile traveled. Has anyone come across a reliable statistics on
    > this?
    >
    > I was considering to sell my car and to buy a motorcycle to save on
    > gas on longer trips. Then I came across a statistics saying that a
    > motorcyclist is 15 (or smth like that) times more likely to get killed
    > than a car driver, per mile traveled. So I figured the gas is not
    > worth it. But then I figured, perhaps me riding my bicycle to work
    > could be statistically even more dangerous (not that I care).


    It depends. Check the down tube for a decal that says, "ACME Novelty
    Exploding Bicycle". If the bike has this decal, yes--you've gotten
    yourself into a pickle.
     
  4. Peter H

    Peter H Guest

    On Jun 7, 1:20 am, "[email protected]" <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    > I am wondering if riding a bicycle is safer than riding a motorcycle,
    > per mile traveled. Has anyone come across a reliable statistics on
    > this?
    >
    > I was considering to sell my car and to buy a motorcycle to save on
    > gas on longer trips. Then I came across a statistics saying that a
    > motorcyclist is 15 (or smth like that) times more likely to get killed
    > than a car driver, per mile traveled. So I figured the gas is not
    > worth it. But then I figured, perhaps me riding my bicycle to work
    > could be statistically even more dangerous (not that I care).


    I wouldn't put a lot of faith in the stats that you find. I suggest
    that the risks associated with bike riding are directly related to
    where and when you ride.

    I would not consider riding on the road during rush hour where I
    live... in fact I ride on the roads here as little as possible. Most
    of my riding is done on trails, where the thought of personal injury
    never even enters my mind. I realize that not everyone is fortunate
    enough to have a good trail system nearby for their pleasure, but am
    thankful that I do.

    I have noticed that when I do ride on the roads some vehicles take
    great care to ensure that they do not move one inch to the left of the
    middle of their lane, whether there's room there or not. There's
    something about having a 1 1/2 ton machine drive by you 18" from your
    left elbow that gives me the heebeegeebees.

    Peter H
     
  5. Zen Cohen

    Zen Cohen Guest

    "Peter H" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    I wouldn't put a lot of faith in the stats that you find. I suggest
    that the risks associated with bike riding are directly related to
    where and when you ride.

    I would not consider riding on the road during rush hour where I
    live...

    ----

    I imagine it's much more dangerous riding on busy streets. This is where I
    usually ride and despite bike lanes on most roads I travel, I've had many
    close calls that could easily have resulted in serious injury/death, the
    most recent where a speeding car didn't see me, suddenly braked and veered
    at the last second, clipping my rear wheel. I've gotten pretty fed up with
    it and just ride less now.
     
  6. On Jun 8, 1:32 am, "Zen Cohen" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I imagine it's much more dangerous riding on busy streets. This is where I
    > usually ride and despite bike lanes on most roads I travel, I've had many
    > close calls that could easily have resulted in serious injury/death, the
    > most recent where a speeding car didn't see me, suddenly braked and veered
    > at the last second, clipping my rear wheel. I've gotten pretty fed up with
    > it and just ride less now.


    It sounds like you just described a "right hook," and right hooks by
    motorists are just one of the common car-bike crash types that are
    made worse by bike lanes.

    When you're approaching a place where a motorist behind you is likely
    to turn right, it's better to be further out in the roadway. That way
    they're much less likely to right hook you.

    - Frank Krygowski
     
  7. On Jun 8, 8:11 am, Frank Krygowski <[email protected]> wrote:

    > It sounds like you just described a "right hook,"


    Read it again.
     
  8. On Jun 8, 2:21 pm, [email protected] wrote:
    > On Jun 8, 8:11 am, Frank Krygowski <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > It sounds like you just described a "right hook,"

    >
    > Read it again.


    I read it again. It still sounds like a right hook to me.

    Zen Cohen might want to explain the situation a little more clearly.
    Which way did the car "veer" and why? I was envisioning a quick right
    turn in front of the cyclist.

    - Frank Krygowski
     
  9. On 2008-06-08, Frank Krygowski <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Jun 8, 2:21 pm, [email protected] wrote:
    >> On Jun 8, 8:11 am, Frank Krygowski <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> > It sounds like you just described a "right hook,"

    >>
    >> Read it again.

    >
    > I read it again. It still sounds like a right hook to me.
    >
    > Zen Cohen might want to explain the situation a little more clearly.
    > Which way did the car "veer" and why? I was envisioning a quick right
    > turn in front of the cyclist.


    I saw it as a straight-up rear-end collision, averted only at the last
    second.

    --

    Kristian Zoerhoff
    [email protected]
     
  10. Zen Cohen

    Zen Cohen Guest

    "Kristian M Zoerhoff" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2008-06-08, Frank Krygowski <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On Jun 8, 2:21 pm, [email protected] wrote:
    >>> On Jun 8, 8:11 am, Frank Krygowski <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> > It sounds like you just described a "right hook,"
    >>>
    >>> Read it again.

    >>
    >> I read it again. It still sounds like a right hook to me.
    >>
    >> Zen Cohen might want to explain the situation a little more clearly.
    >> Which way did the car "veer" and why? I was envisioning a quick right
    >> turn in front of the cyclist.

    >
    > I saw it as a straight-up rear-end collision, averted only at the last
    > second.


    I wasn't very clear but that's pretty much it. I've also been the recipient
    of a right hook, though. Another reason that riding on the street has not
    been much fun these days.
     
  11. On Jun 7, 9:45 am, peter <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Jun 6, 10:20 pm, "[email protected]"
    >


    > Unfortunately good statistics on bicycle usage are rather hard to
    > find. Although getting a bit dated, the discussion at:http://www.kenkifer.com/bikepages/health/risks.htm
    > is still a good summary. In general most studies seem to indicate
    > that cycling is a bit more dangerous than car driving *per mile* and a
    > bit less dangerous when figured *per hour*. Motorcycling is far more
    > dangerous by either measure. [One confounding factor is that the
    > people who take up motorcycling are more likely to be risk-takers and
    > might have a higher rate of accidents than average in other vehicles
    > as well.]


    I suspect that the per hour statistic is more meaningful than the per
    mile version. When you are planning routes for a bicycle rather than
    a car you tend to try harder to shorten your route. Motorists tend to
    go out miles and miles out of route to drive faster, even with $4 a
    gallon gasoline. On the other hand I've changed jobs to make make my
    commute (by bike) shorter as I've gotten older and fatter.
     
  12. On Jun 7, 7:14 pm, Peter H <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Jun 7, 1:20 am, "[email protected]" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > I am wondering if riding a bicycle is safer than riding a motorcycle,
    > > per mile traveled. Has anyone come across a reliable statistics on
    > > this?

    >
    > > I was considering to sell my car and to buy a motorcycle to save on
    > > gas on longer trips. Then I came across a statistics saying that a
    > > motorcyclist is 15 (or smth like that) times more likely to get killed
    > > than a car driver, per mile traveled. So I figured the gas is not
    > > worth it. But then I figured, perhaps me riding my bicycle to work
    > > could be statistically even more dangerous (not that I care).

    >
    > I wouldn't put a lot of faith in the stats that you find. I suggest
    > that the risks associated with bike riding are directly related to
    > where and when you ride.
    >
    > I would not consider riding on the road during rush hour where I
    > live... in fact I ride on the roads here as little as possible. Most
    > of my riding is done on trails, where the thought of personal injury
    > never even enters my mind. I realize that not everyone is fortunate
    > enough to have a good trail system nearby for their pleasure, but am
    > thankful that I do.
    >
    > I have noticed that when I do ride on the roads some vehicles take
    > great care to ensure that they do not move one inch to the left of the
    > middle of their lane, whether there's room there or not. There's
    > something about having a 1 1/2 ton machine drive by you 18" from your
    > left elbow that gives me the heebeegeebees.
    >
    > Peter H


    Gee, my experience has been just the opposite... I have only been
    injured while bicycling off the road, I have never gone endo on my
    daily commute.
     
  13. Bill

    Bill Guest

    DennisTheBald wrote:
    > On Jun 7, 9:45 am, peter <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On Jun 6, 10:20 pm, "[email protected]"
    >>

    >
    >> Unfortunately good statistics on bicycle usage are rather hard to
    >> find. Although getting a bit dated, the discussion at:http://www.kenkifer.com/bikepages/health/risks.htm
    >> is still a good summary. In general most studies seem to indicate
    >> that cycling is a bit more dangerous than car driving *per mile* and a
    >> bit less dangerous when figured *per hour*. Motorcycling is far more
    >> dangerous by either measure. [One confounding factor is that the
    >> people who take up motorcycling are more likely to be risk-takers and
    >> might have a higher rate of accidents than average in other vehicles
    >> as well.]

    >
    > I suspect that the per hour statistic is more meaningful than the per
    > mile version. When you are planning routes for a bicycle rather than
    > a car you tend to try harder to shorten your route. Motorists tend to
    > go out miles and miles out of route to drive faster, even with $4 a
    > gallon gasoline. On the other hand I've changed jobs to make make my
    > commute (by bike) shorter as I've gotten older and fatter.


    Ummm, Dennis,
    I can lose about a pound a day when I go out on long rides and limit my
    food intake, and I am a few months from turning 60. Just avoid the junk
    food places like Mcyou-know-who and you should be OK.
    Off topic again.
    Bye.
    Bill Baka
     
  14. On Jun 7, 9:56 am, Frank Krygowski <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Bicycling is NOT very dangerous. It does us no good to pretend it is.
    >
    > - Frank Krygowski



    Roger that!
    There is nothing dangerous about bicycles, well unless you derive a
    significant amount of your income from the manufacture and or sale of
    motor vehicles, motor fuel, or the advertising revenue from those
    industries. But that aside, it's a logic fallacy anyway, Bikes just
    aren't dangerous. But don't expect the media that lives on advertising
    to spread that word.

    Cars on the other hand are plenty dangerous. They're dangerous to the
    people driving & riding in them, to the people living or working near
    where they are driven, to the people that manufacture them, they're
    just plain dangerous. But don't expect the media that lives on
    advertising to spread that word either.

    I'm not certain about your religion, and I'm not gonna ask. But mine
    teaches that the Good Lord looks after each and every one of us, not a
    sparrow falls from the sky without His knowing. And that there is no
    fear in dying, we're all gonna do it sooner or later. My religion
    also teaches that it's wrong to kill, unequivocally. I'm not all that
    pious and I'm willing to make some exceptions; I'm willing to pack
    heat in case one of those exceptional situations arises. But I'm not
    willing to kill somebody with a car just because I don't want to get
    sweaty on my way to work, or because I'm just in a big hurry, or
    because I'm scared. If I were to succumb to the fear that some nimrod
    in a hotrod might run me down and kill me and join the ranks of the
    motoring behind that fear I would not be making the world any safer,
    but more dangerous.
     

  15. > Ummm, Dennis,
    > I can lose about a pound a day when I go out on long rides and limit my
    > food intake, and I am a few months from turning 60. Just avoid the junk
    > food places like Mcyou-know-who and you should be OK.
    > Off topic again.
    > Bye.


    > Bill Baka



    A pound a day? That sounds like you're measuring your fluid loss,
    either that or you must have been really fat. Me, I've been cycling
    for years and I still keep getting older and heavier in spite of it.
    I might want to do something about the older, but I'm not too
    concerned about the heavier. I would like to be as fast as I was when
    I was 40 again. I'd like to see as clearly as I did when I was 40
    again for that matter, but I'm not willing to give up seeing my
    children grown to go back to it. And I'm not willing to go on
    'training rides' to recoup my former speed.

    My point is that people that do their business by bike tend to be more
    considerate of distances than people who do theirs by motor, but we
    all live on the same 24 hour clock. So we are all constrained to
    limit the amount of time we spend with the various activities... I
    know people that spend an hour and a half each way driving back and
    forth to work, I used to spend that same amount of time cycling back
    and forth - granted I was going a much shorter distance than Cayce was
    in his car... but we both came to the same conclusion: that was too
    much time to spend commuting each day. I think it's gonna make more
    sense to compare hours than miles as most folks will change the
    parameters of their lives to conform to the time they are allotted.
    People that are dead set on driving will keep moving further and
    further afield in order to continue to spend a couple hours a day in
    their beloved autos and people that switch from motoring to pedaling
    will start to trade closer to home when they do.
     
Loading...
Loading...