Achilles tendonitis advise

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Sethvir, Jun 28, 2005.

  1. Sethvir

    Sethvir Guest

    I'm 46, 6' x 170#, 31" waist, and am very active. I manage the back end of
    a large retail store, meaning a lot of lifting boxes and walking an average
    of 15 miles a day (measured). I bike 50+ miles a week road and trail, lift
    free weights twice a week, and play softball. Overall I'm really happy with
    my state of fitness and energy level, except...

    Lately I've had some pain and swelling in my lower left achilles tendon.
    Not debilitating, but it really stiffens up when I stop / sit for a while.
    I get some relief from ibuprophen, and icing helps as well. Anyone have
    success treating similar symptoms? I understand that "total" rest might be
    best, but don't want to give up my activities.

    Please reply to group. TIA
     
    Tags:


  2. On 2005-06-28, Sethvir <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I'm 46, 6' x 170#, 31" waist, and am very active. I manage the back end of
    > a large retail store, meaning a lot of lifting boxes and walking an average
    > of 15 miles a day (measured). I bike 50+ miles a week road and trail, lift
    > free weights twice a week, and play softball. Overall I'm really happy with
    > my state of fitness and energy level, except...
    >
    > Lately I've had some pain and swelling in my lower left achilles tendon.
    > Not debilitating, but it really stiffens up when I stop / sit for a while.
    > I get some relief from ibuprophen, and icing helps as well. Anyone have
    > success treating similar symptoms? I understand that "total" rest might be
    > best, but don't want to give up my activities.


    Keep icing it. Also consider placing a heel lift in your shoe when you're at
    work -- and be attentive to the footwear you're using at work. Walking very
    high mileage (15 miles a day is pretty high!) in the wrong shoe could make it
    worse.

    Avoid anything that places stress on the tendon. Most of the exercises you're
    doing should be OK. In particular, lifting and biking should be fine. I've
    had achilles tendon problems, and lifting weights (even calves) didn't aggravate
    the injury at all. Softball could be a problem, because it involves a lot of
    fast acceleration from a standstill. Half a dozen or so hard accelerations is
    already enough to aggravate it, if it's already injured. I'd recommend either
    cutting it out, or at least look for ways to avoid running too hard when you play it.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  3. Hobbes

    Hobbes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 2005-06-28, Sethvir <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > I'm 46, 6' x 170#, 31" waist, and am very active. I manage the back end of
    > > a large retail store, meaning a lot of lifting boxes and walking an average
    > > of 15 miles a day (measured). I bike 50+ miles a week road and trail, lift
    > > free weights twice a week, and play softball. Overall I'm really happy
    > > with
    > > my state of fitness and energy level, except...
    > >
    > > Lately I've had some pain and swelling in my lower left achilles tendon.
    > > Not debilitating, but it really stiffens up when I stop / sit for a while.
    > > I get some relief from ibuprophen, and icing helps as well. Anyone have
    > > success treating similar symptoms? I understand that "total" rest might be
    > > best, but don't want to give up my activities.

    >
    > Keep icing it. Also consider placing a heel lift in your shoe when you're at
    > work -- and be attentive to the footwear you're using at work. Walking very
    > high mileage (15 miles a day is pretty high!) in the wrong shoe could make it
    > worse.
    >
    > Avoid anything that places stress on the tendon. Most of the exercises you're
    > doing should be OK. In particular, lifting and biking should be fine. I've
    > had achilles tendon problems, and lifting weights (even calves) didn't
    > aggravate
    > the injury at all. Softball could be a problem, because it involves a lot of
    > fast acceleration from a standstill. Half a dozen or so hard accelerations
    > is
    > already enough to aggravate it, if it's already injured. I'd recommend either
    > cutting it out, or at least look for ways to avoid running too hard when you
    > play it.


    I'm kinda shocked a runner didn't see the study on tendonitis. Lyle sent
    me a copy - I applied it and rehabbed the achilles tendonitis that had
    been bothering me for years.

    Heavy eccentrics. Use a heavy weight for calf raises using both legs and
    then switch to the achilles that is bothering you and lower the weight
    very, very slowly. It sounds crazy, but there was an excellent study
    done on this technique and it had a higher success rate than other
    interventions used - most notably drugs.

    It sounds crazy, but it really works. Do heavy eccentric calf raises
    daily if you can. If I don't have access to a calf machine I'll do a few
    reps on the stairs.

    --
    Keith
     
  4. Lee Michaels

    Lee Michaels Guest

    "Hobbes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 2005-06-28, Sethvir <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> > I'm 46, 6' x 170#, 31" waist, and am very active. I manage the back
    >> > end of
    >> > a large retail store, meaning a lot of lifting boxes and walking an
    >> > average
    >> > of 15 miles a day (measured). I bike 50+ miles a week road and trail,
    >> > lift
    >> > free weights twice a week, and play softball. Overall I'm really happy
    >> > with
    >> > my state of fitness and energy level, except...
    >> >
    >> > Lately I've had some pain and swelling in my lower left achilles
    >> > tendon.
    >> > Not debilitating, but it really stiffens up when I stop / sit for a
    >> > while.
    >> > I get some relief from ibuprophen, and icing helps as well. Anyone
    >> > have
    >> > success treating similar symptoms? I understand that "total" rest
    >> > might be
    >> > best, but don't want to give up my activities.

    >>
    >> Keep icing it. Also consider placing a heel lift in your shoe when you're
    >> at
    >> work -- and be attentive to the footwear you're using at work. Walking
    >> very
    >> high mileage (15 miles a day is pretty high!) in the wrong shoe could
    >> make it
    >> worse.
    >>
    >> Avoid anything that places stress on the tendon. Most of the exercises
    >> you're
    >> doing should be OK. In particular, lifting and biking should be fine.
    >> I've
    >> had achilles tendon problems, and lifting weights (even calves) didn't
    >> aggravate
    >> the injury at all. Softball could be a problem, because it involves a lot
    >> of
    >> fast acceleration from a standstill. Half a dozen or so hard
    >> accelerations
    >> is
    >> already enough to aggravate it, if it's already injured. I'd recommend
    >> either
    >> cutting it out, or at least look for ways to avoid running too hard when
    >> you
    >> play it.

    >
    > I'm kinda shocked a runner didn't see the study on tendonitis. Lyle sent
    > me a copy - I applied it and rehabbed the achilles tendonitis that had
    > been bothering me for years.
    >
    > Heavy eccentrics. Use a heavy weight for calf raises using both legs and
    > then switch to the achilles that is bothering you and lower the weight
    > very, very slowly. It sounds crazy, but there was an excellent study
    > done on this technique and it had a higher success rate than other
    > interventions used - most notably drugs.
    >
    > It sounds crazy, but it really works. Do heavy eccentric calf raises
    > daily if you can. If I don't have access to a calf machine I'll do a few
    > reps on the stairs.
    >


    Good to know Keith.

    Is there any thoughts or theories as to why the eccentrics are so effective
    for this application?
     
  5. "Hobbes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 2005-06-28, Sethvir <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> > I'm 46, 6' x 170#, 31" waist, and am very active. I manage the back
    >> > end of
    >> > a large retail store, meaning a lot of lifting boxes and walking an
    >> > average
    >> > of 15 miles a day (measured). I bike 50+ miles a week road and trail,
    >> > lift
    >> > free weights twice a week, and play softball. Overall I'm really happy
    >> > with
    >> > my state of fitness and energy level, except...
    >> >
    >> > Lately I've had some pain and swelling in my lower left achilles
    >> > tendon.
    >> > Not debilitating, but it really stiffens up when I stop / sit for a
    >> > while.
    >> > I get some relief from ibuprophen, and icing helps as well. Anyone
    >> > have
    >> > success treating similar symptoms? I understand that "total" rest
    >> > might be
    >> > best, but don't want to give up my activities.

    >>
    >> Keep icing it. Also consider placing a heel lift in your shoe when you're
    >> at
    >> work -- and be attentive to the footwear you're using at work. Walking
    >> very
    >> high mileage (15 miles a day is pretty high!) in the wrong shoe could
    >> make it
    >> worse.
    >>
    >> Avoid anything that places stress on the tendon. Most of the exercises
    >> you're
    >> doing should be OK. In particular, lifting and biking should be fine.
    >> I've
    >> had achilles tendon problems, and lifting weights (even calves) didn't
    >> aggravate
    >> the injury at all. Softball could be a problem, because it involves a lot
    >> of
    >> fast acceleration from a standstill. Half a dozen or so hard
    >> accelerations
    >> is
    >> already enough to aggravate it, if it's already injured. I'd recommend
    >> either
    >> cutting it out, or at least look for ways to avoid running too hard when
    >> you
    >> play it.

    >
    > I'm kinda shocked a runner didn't see the study on tendonitis. Lyle sent
    > me a copy - I applied it and rehabbed the achilles tendonitis that had
    > been bothering me for years.
    >
    > Heavy eccentrics. Use a heavy weight for calf raises using both legs and
    > then switch to the achilles that is bothering you and lower the weight
    > very, very slowly. It sounds crazy, but there was an excellent study
    > done on this technique and it had a higher success rate than other
    > interventions used - most notably drugs.
    >
    > It sounds crazy, but it really works. Do heavy eccentric calf raises
    > daily if you can. If I don't have access to a calf machine I'll do a few
    > reps on the stairs.
    >


    Think that'll work on elbow tendonitis using bicep curls?
     
  6. Hobbes

    Hobbes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "JC Der Koenig" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Hobbes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> On 2005-06-28, Sethvir <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> > I'm 46, 6' x 170#, 31" waist, and am very active. I manage the back
    > >> > end of
    > >> > a large retail store, meaning a lot of lifting boxes and walking an
    > >> > average
    > >> > of 15 miles a day (measured). I bike 50+ miles a week road and trail,
    > >> > lift
    > >> > free weights twice a week, and play softball. Overall I'm really happy
    > >> > with
    > >> > my state of fitness and energy level, except...
    > >> >
    > >> > Lately I've had some pain and swelling in my lower left achilles
    > >> > tendon.
    > >> > Not debilitating, but it really stiffens up when I stop / sit for a
    > >> > while.
    > >> > I get some relief from ibuprophen, and icing helps as well. Anyone
    > >> > have
    > >> > success treating similar symptoms? I understand that "total" rest
    > >> > might be
    > >> > best, but don't want to give up my activities.
    > >>
    > >> Keep icing it. Also consider placing a heel lift in your shoe when you're
    > >> at
    > >> work -- and be attentive to the footwear you're using at work. Walking
    > >> very
    > >> high mileage (15 miles a day is pretty high!) in the wrong shoe could
    > >> make it
    > >> worse.
    > >>
    > >> Avoid anything that places stress on the tendon. Most of the exercises
    > >> you're
    > >> doing should be OK. In particular, lifting and biking should be fine.
    > >> I've
    > >> had achilles tendon problems, and lifting weights (even calves) didn't
    > >> aggravate
    > >> the injury at all. Softball could be a problem, because it involves a lot
    > >> of
    > >> fast acceleration from a standstill. Half a dozen or so hard
    > >> accelerations
    > >> is
    > >> already enough to aggravate it, if it's already injured. I'd recommend
    > >> either
    > >> cutting it out, or at least look for ways to avoid running too hard when
    > >> you
    > >> play it.

    > >
    > > I'm kinda shocked a runner didn't see the study on tendonitis. Lyle sent
    > > me a copy - I applied it and rehabbed the achilles tendonitis that had
    > > been bothering me for years.
    > >
    > > Heavy eccentrics. Use a heavy weight for calf raises using both legs and
    > > then switch to the achilles that is bothering you and lower the weight
    > > very, very slowly. It sounds crazy, but there was an excellent study
    > > done on this technique and it had a higher success rate than other
    > > interventions used - most notably drugs.
    > >
    > > It sounds crazy, but it really works. Do heavy eccentric calf raises
    > > daily if you can. If I don't have access to a calf machine I'll do a few
    > > reps on the stairs.
    > >

    >
    > Think that'll work on elbow tendonitis using bicep curls?
    >
    >


    I'd definately try it.

    --
    Keith
     
  7. "Hobbes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "JC Der Koenig" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Hobbes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> > In article <[email protected]>,
    >> > Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> On 2005-06-28, Sethvir <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >> > I'm 46, 6' x 170#, 31" waist, and am very active. I manage the back
    >> >> > end of
    >> >> > a large retail store, meaning a lot of lifting boxes and walking an
    >> >> > average
    >> >> > of 15 miles a day (measured). I bike 50+ miles a week road and
    >> >> > trail,
    >> >> > lift
    >> >> > free weights twice a week, and play softball. Overall I'm really
    >> >> > happy
    >> >> > with
    >> >> > my state of fitness and energy level, except...
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Lately I've had some pain and swelling in my lower left achilles
    >> >> > tendon.
    >> >> > Not debilitating, but it really stiffens up when I stop / sit for a
    >> >> > while.
    >> >> > I get some relief from ibuprophen, and icing helps as well. Anyone
    >> >> > have
    >> >> > success treating similar symptoms? I understand that "total" rest
    >> >> > might be
    >> >> > best, but don't want to give up my activities.
    >> >>
    >> >> Keep icing it. Also consider placing a heel lift in your shoe when
    >> >> you're
    >> >> at
    >> >> work -- and be attentive to the footwear you're using at work. Walking
    >> >> very
    >> >> high mileage (15 miles a day is pretty high!) in the wrong shoe could
    >> >> make it
    >> >> worse.
    >> >>
    >> >> Avoid anything that places stress on the tendon. Most of the exercises
    >> >> you're
    >> >> doing should be OK. In particular, lifting and biking should be fine.
    >> >> I've
    >> >> had achilles tendon problems, and lifting weights (even calves) didn't
    >> >> aggravate
    >> >> the injury at all. Softball could be a problem, because it involves a
    >> >> lot
    >> >> of
    >> >> fast acceleration from a standstill. Half a dozen or so hard
    >> >> accelerations
    >> >> is
    >> >> already enough to aggravate it, if it's already injured. I'd recommend
    >> >> either
    >> >> cutting it out, or at least look for ways to avoid running too hard
    >> >> when
    >> >> you
    >> >> play it.
    >> >
    >> > I'm kinda shocked a runner didn't see the study on tendonitis. Lyle
    >> > sent
    >> > me a copy - I applied it and rehabbed the achilles tendonitis that had
    >> > been bothering me for years.
    >> >
    >> > Heavy eccentrics. Use a heavy weight for calf raises using both legs
    >> > and
    >> > then switch to the achilles that is bothering you and lower the weight
    >> > very, very slowly. It sounds crazy, but there was an excellent study
    >> > done on this technique and it had a higher success rate than other
    >> > interventions used - most notably drugs.
    >> >
    >> > It sounds crazy, but it really works. Do heavy eccentric calf raises
    >> > daily if you can. If I don't have access to a calf machine I'll do a
    >> > few
    >> > reps on the stairs.
    >> >

    >>
    >> Think that'll work on elbow tendonitis using bicep curls?
    >>
    >>

    >
    > I'd definately try it.
    >


    I will. Definitely.
     
  8. On 2005-06-28, Hobbes <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm kinda shocked a runner didn't see the study on tendonitis. Lyle sent
    > me a copy - I applied it and rehabbed the achilles tendonitis that had
    > been bothering me for years.


    Yeah, I did see it. Still not sure what to make of it. It's definitely worth
    a try for a long time AT sufferer, but I'd put other items in front of it
    on the list, especially desisting from whatever caused the injury.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  9. On 2005-06-28, Hobbes <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm kinda shocked a runner didn't see the study on tendonitis. Lyle sent
    > me a copy - I applied it and rehabbed the achilles tendonitis that had
    > been bothering me for years.


    Yeah, I did see it. Still not sure what to make of it. It's definitely worth
    a try for a long time AT sufferer, but I'd put other items in front of it
    on the list, especially desisting from whatever caused the injury.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  10. Hobbes

    Hobbes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:

    > "Hobbes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> On 2005-06-28, Sethvir <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> > I'm 46, 6' x 170#, 31" waist, and am very active. I manage the back
    > >> > end of
    > >> > a large retail store, meaning a lot of lifting boxes and walking an
    > >> > average
    > >> > of 15 miles a day (measured). I bike 50+ miles a week road and trail,
    > >> > lift
    > >> > free weights twice a week, and play softball. Overall I'm really happy
    > >> > with
    > >> > my state of fitness and energy level, except...
    > >> >
    > >> > Lately I've had some pain and swelling in my lower left achilles
    > >> > tendon.
    > >> > Not debilitating, but it really stiffens up when I stop / sit for a
    > >> > while.
    > >> > I get some relief from ibuprophen, and icing helps as well. Anyone
    > >> > have
    > >> > success treating similar symptoms? I understand that "total" rest
    > >> > might be
    > >> > best, but don't want to give up my activities.
    > >>
    > >> Keep icing it. Also consider placing a heel lift in your shoe when you're
    > >> at
    > >> work -- and be attentive to the footwear you're using at work. Walking
    > >> very
    > >> high mileage (15 miles a day is pretty high!) in the wrong shoe could
    > >> make it
    > >> worse.
    > >>
    > >> Avoid anything that places stress on the tendon. Most of the exercises
    > >> you're
    > >> doing should be OK. In particular, lifting and biking should be fine.
    > >> I've
    > >> had achilles tendon problems, and lifting weights (even calves) didn't
    > >> aggravate
    > >> the injury at all. Softball could be a problem, because it involves a lot
    > >> of
    > >> fast acceleration from a standstill. Half a dozen or so hard
    > >> accelerations
    > >> is
    > >> already enough to aggravate it, if it's already injured. I'd recommend
    > >> either
    > >> cutting it out, or at least look for ways to avoid running too hard when
    > >> you
    > >> play it.

    > >
    > > I'm kinda shocked a runner didn't see the study on tendonitis. Lyle sent
    > > me a copy - I applied it and rehabbed the achilles tendonitis that had
    > > been bothering me for years.
    > >
    > > Heavy eccentrics. Use a heavy weight for calf raises using both legs and
    > > then switch to the achilles that is bothering you and lower the weight
    > > very, very slowly. It sounds crazy, but there was an excellent study
    > > done on this technique and it had a higher success rate than other
    > > interventions used - most notably drugs.
    > >
    > > It sounds crazy, but it really works. Do heavy eccentric calf raises
    > > daily if you can. If I don't have access to a calf machine I'll do a few
    > > reps on the stairs.
    > >

    >
    > Good to know Keith.
    >
    > Is there any thoughts or theories as to why the eccentrics are so effective
    > for this application?
    >
    >


    Read up on a summary of the study here:

    http://www.sportsinjurybulletin.com/archive/achilles-tendonitis.html

    I don't know about their 'improvement', but here they figure it is the
    increase in strength. I'm not sure - I'll look at the study again. I
    thought Lyle felt it was a hormonal/protein synthesis response to the
    heavy eccentrics which helped heal the inflammation. I could be wrong -
    I didn't check out the science.

    Too bad the scientists were largely driven out of MFW, eh?

    --
    Keith
     
  11. Hobbes

    Hobbes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:

    > "Hobbes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> On 2005-06-28, Sethvir <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> > I'm 46, 6' x 170#, 31" waist, and am very active. I manage the back
    > >> > end of
    > >> > a large retail store, meaning a lot of lifting boxes and walking an
    > >> > average
    > >> > of 15 miles a day (measured). I bike 50+ miles a week road and trail,
    > >> > lift
    > >> > free weights twice a week, and play softball. Overall I'm really happy
    > >> > with
    > >> > my state of fitness and energy level, except...
    > >> >
    > >> > Lately I've had some pain and swelling in my lower left achilles
    > >> > tendon.
    > >> > Not debilitating, but it really stiffens up when I stop / sit for a
    > >> > while.
    > >> > I get some relief from ibuprophen, and icing helps as well. Anyone
    > >> > have
    > >> > success treating similar symptoms? I understand that "total" rest
    > >> > might be
    > >> > best, but don't want to give up my activities.
    > >>
    > >> Keep icing it. Also consider placing a heel lift in your shoe when you're
    > >> at
    > >> work -- and be attentive to the footwear you're using at work. Walking
    > >> very
    > >> high mileage (15 miles a day is pretty high!) in the wrong shoe could
    > >> make it
    > >> worse.
    > >>
    > >> Avoid anything that places stress on the tendon. Most of the exercises
    > >> you're
    > >> doing should be OK. In particular, lifting and biking should be fine.
    > >> I've
    > >> had achilles tendon problems, and lifting weights (even calves) didn't
    > >> aggravate
    > >> the injury at all. Softball could be a problem, because it involves a lot
    > >> of
    > >> fast acceleration from a standstill. Half a dozen or so hard
    > >> accelerations
    > >> is
    > >> already enough to aggravate it, if it's already injured. I'd recommend
    > >> either
    > >> cutting it out, or at least look for ways to avoid running too hard when
    > >> you
    > >> play it.

    > >
    > > I'm kinda shocked a runner didn't see the study on tendonitis. Lyle sent
    > > me a copy - I applied it and rehabbed the achilles tendonitis that had
    > > been bothering me for years.
    > >
    > > Heavy eccentrics. Use a heavy weight for calf raises using both legs and
    > > then switch to the achilles that is bothering you and lower the weight
    > > very, very slowly. It sounds crazy, but there was an excellent study
    > > done on this technique and it had a higher success rate than other
    > > interventions used - most notably drugs.
    > >
    > > It sounds crazy, but it really works. Do heavy eccentric calf raises
    > > daily if you can. If I don't have access to a calf machine I'll do a few
    > > reps on the stairs.
    > >

    >
    > Good to know Keith.
    >
    > Is there any thoughts or theories as to why the eccentrics are so effective
    > for this application?
    >
    >


    Read up on a summary of the study here:

    http://www.sportsinjurybulletin.com/archive/achilles-tendonitis.html

    I don't know about their 'improvement', but here they figure it is the
    increase in strength. I'm not sure - I'll look at the study again. I
    thought Lyle felt it was a hormonal/protein synthesis response to the
    heavy eccentrics which helped heal the inflammation. I could be wrong -
    I didn't check out the science.

    Too bad the scientists were largely driven out of MFW, eh?

    --
    Keith
     
  12. Hobbes

    Hobbes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "JC Der Koenig" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Hobbes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > "JC Der Koenig" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> "Hobbes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> news:[email protected]
    > >> > In article <[email protected]>,
    > >> > Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >> On 2005-06-28, Sethvir <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >> > I'm 46, 6' x 170#, 31" waist, and am very active. I manage the back
    > >> >> > end of
    > >> >> > a large retail store, meaning a lot of lifting boxes and walking an
    > >> >> > average
    > >> >> > of 15 miles a day (measured). I bike 50+ miles a week road and
    > >> >> > trail,
    > >> >> > lift
    > >> >> > free weights twice a week, and play softball. Overall I'm really
    > >> >> > happy
    > >> >> > with
    > >> >> > my state of fitness and energy level, except...
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > Lately I've had some pain and swelling in my lower left achilles
    > >> >> > tendon.
    > >> >> > Not debilitating, but it really stiffens up when I stop / sit for a
    > >> >> > while.
    > >> >> > I get some relief from ibuprophen, and icing helps as well. Anyone
    > >> >> > have
    > >> >> > success treating similar symptoms? I understand that "total" rest
    > >> >> > might be
    > >> >> > best, but don't want to give up my activities.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Keep icing it. Also consider placing a heel lift in your shoe when
    > >> >> you're
    > >> >> at
    > >> >> work -- and be attentive to the footwear you're using at work. Walking
    > >> >> very
    > >> >> high mileage (15 miles a day is pretty high!) in the wrong shoe could
    > >> >> make it
    > >> >> worse.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Avoid anything that places stress on the tendon. Most of the exercises
    > >> >> you're
    > >> >> doing should be OK. In particular, lifting and biking should be fine.
    > >> >> I've
    > >> >> had achilles tendon problems, and lifting weights (even calves) didn't
    > >> >> aggravate
    > >> >> the injury at all. Softball could be a problem, because it involves a
    > >> >> lot
    > >> >> of
    > >> >> fast acceleration from a standstill. Half a dozen or so hard
    > >> >> accelerations
    > >> >> is
    > >> >> already enough to aggravate it, if it's already injured. I'd recommend
    > >> >> either
    > >> >> cutting it out, or at least look for ways to avoid running too hard
    > >> >> when
    > >> >> you
    > >> >> play it.
    > >> >
    > >> > I'm kinda shocked a runner didn't see the study on tendonitis. Lyle
    > >> > sent
    > >> > me a copy - I applied it and rehabbed the achilles tendonitis that had
    > >> > been bothering me for years.
    > >> >
    > >> > Heavy eccentrics. Use a heavy weight for calf raises using both legs
    > >> > and
    > >> > then switch to the achilles that is bothering you and lower the weight
    > >> > very, very slowly. It sounds crazy, but there was an excellent study
    > >> > done on this technique and it had a higher success rate than other
    > >> > interventions used - most notably drugs.
    > >> >
    > >> > It sounds crazy, but it really works. Do heavy eccentric calf raises
    > >> > daily if you can. If I don't have access to a calf machine I'll do a
    > >> > few
    > >> > reps on the stairs.
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >> Think that'll work on elbow tendonitis using bicep curls?
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > > I'd definately try it.
    > >

    >
    > I will. Definitely.
    >
    >


    LOL!

    --
    Keith
     
  13. Sethvir

    Sethvir Guest

    Thanks to all for the quick replies. I'll try adding some heavy calf work
    and see if that helps. I've been wearing good, supportive light hiking
    boots since starting this job (>6 mo.) to accommodate the walking. Since
    they put us on pedometers ("store contest"), I've logged up to 24 miles in a
    single day, with no problem or pain - the problem has only shown up in the
    last 3 weeks or so. I think that part of the problem may be with too many
    long days in a row without rest - working off days due to vacations, etc.

    I should add that I've lurked and read here for several years, and thought I
    might receive some good advice - glad I asked.
     
  14. Lee Michaels

    Lee Michaels Guest

    "Hobbes" <[email protected]> wrote

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:
    >
    >> "Hobbes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> > In article <[email protected]>,
    >> > Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> On 2005-06-28, Sethvir <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >> > I'm 46, 6' x 170#, 31" waist, and am very active. I manage the back
    >> >> > end of
    >> >> > a large retail store, meaning a lot of lifting boxes and walking an
    >> >> > average
    >> >> > of 15 miles a day (measured). I bike 50+ miles a week road and
    >> >> > trail,
    >> >> > lift
    >> >> > free weights twice a week, and play softball. Overall I'm really
    >> >> > happy
    >> >> > with
    >> >> > my state of fitness and energy level, except...
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Lately I've had some pain and swelling in my lower left achilles
    >> >> > tendon.
    >> >> > Not debilitating, but it really stiffens up when I stop / sit for a
    >> >> > while.
    >> >> > I get some relief from ibuprophen, and icing helps as well. Anyone
    >> >> > have
    >> >> > success treating similar symptoms? I understand that "total" rest
    >> >> > might be
    >> >> > best, but don't want to give up my activities.
    >> >>
    >> >> Keep icing it. Also consider placing a heel lift in your shoe when
    >> >> you're
    >> >> at
    >> >> work -- and be attentive to the footwear you're using at work. Walking
    >> >> very
    >> >> high mileage (15 miles a day is pretty high!) in the wrong shoe could
    >> >> make it
    >> >> worse.
    >> >>
    >> >> Avoid anything that places stress on the tendon. Most of the exercises
    >> >> you're
    >> >> doing should be OK. In particular, lifting and biking should be fine.
    >> >> I've
    >> >> had achilles tendon problems, and lifting weights (even calves) didn't
    >> >> aggravate
    >> >> the injury at all. Softball could be a problem, because it involves a
    >> >> lot
    >> >> of
    >> >> fast acceleration from a standstill. Half a dozen or so hard
    >> >> accelerations
    >> >> is
    >> >> already enough to aggravate it, if it's already injured. I'd recommend
    >> >> either
    >> >> cutting it out, or at least look for ways to avoid running too hard
    >> >> when
    >> >> you
    >> >> play it.
    >> >
    >> > I'm kinda shocked a runner didn't see the study on tendonitis. Lyle
    >> > sent
    >> > me a copy - I applied it and rehabbed the achilles tendonitis that had
    >> > been bothering me for years.
    >> >
    >> > Heavy eccentrics. Use a heavy weight for calf raises using both legs
    >> > and
    >> > then switch to the achilles that is bothering you and lower the weight
    >> > very, very slowly. It sounds crazy, but there was an excellent study
    >> > done on this technique and it had a higher success rate than other
    >> > interventions used - most notably drugs.
    >> >
    >> > It sounds crazy, but it really works. Do heavy eccentric calf raises
    >> > daily if you can. If I don't have access to a calf machine I'll do a
    >> > few
    >> > reps on the stairs.
    >> >

    >>
    >> Good to know Keith.
    >>
    >> Is there any thoughts or theories as to why the eccentrics are so
    >> effective
    >> for this application?
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Read up on a summary of the study here:
    >
    > http://www.sportsinjurybulletin.com/archive/achilles-tendonitis.html
    >
    > I don't know about their 'improvement', but here they figure it is the
    > increase in strength. I'm not sure - I'll look at the study again. I
    > thought Lyle felt it was a hormonal/protein synthesis response to the
    > heavy eccentrics which helped heal the inflammation. I could be wrong -
    > I didn't check out the science.
    >
    > Too bad the scientists were largely driven out of MFW, eh?
    >


    Word.

    I always felt that eccentrics were good for rehab. I have certainly used
    them for both myself and others. But nothing that used very heavy weights.
    My personal observation was there was minimal swelling or inflamation when
    using eccentrics. But the sample population and types of injuries rehabbed
    was quite small.

    How long did it take for you to rehab the achilles tendon Keith??


    And did you use heavy weights?
     
  15. Hobbes

    Hobbes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:

    > "Hobbes" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:
    > >
    > >> "Hobbes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> news:[email protected]
    > >> > In article <[email protected]>,
    > >> > Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >> On 2005-06-28, Sethvir <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >> > I'm 46, 6' x 170#, 31" waist, and am very active. I manage the back
    > >> >> > end of
    > >> >> > a large retail store, meaning a lot of lifting boxes and walking an
    > >> >> > average
    > >> >> > of 15 miles a day (measured). I bike 50+ miles a week road and
    > >> >> > trail,
    > >> >> > lift
    > >> >> > free weights twice a week, and play softball. Overall I'm really
    > >> >> > happy
    > >> >> > with
    > >> >> > my state of fitness and energy level, except...
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > Lately I've had some pain and swelling in my lower left achilles
    > >> >> > tendon.
    > >> >> > Not debilitating, but it really stiffens up when I stop / sit for a
    > >> >> > while.
    > >> >> > I get some relief from ibuprophen, and icing helps as well. Anyone
    > >> >> > have
    > >> >> > success treating similar symptoms? I understand that "total" rest
    > >> >> > might be
    > >> >> > best, but don't want to give up my activities.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Keep icing it. Also consider placing a heel lift in your shoe when
    > >> >> you're
    > >> >> at
    > >> >> work -- and be attentive to the footwear you're using at work. Walking
    > >> >> very
    > >> >> high mileage (15 miles a day is pretty high!) in the wrong shoe could
    > >> >> make it
    > >> >> worse.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Avoid anything that places stress on the tendon. Most of the exercises
    > >> >> you're
    > >> >> doing should be OK. In particular, lifting and biking should be fine.
    > >> >> I've
    > >> >> had achilles tendon problems, and lifting weights (even calves) didn't
    > >> >> aggravate
    > >> >> the injury at all. Softball could be a problem, because it involves a
    > >> >> lot
    > >> >> of
    > >> >> fast acceleration from a standstill. Half a dozen or so hard
    > >> >> accelerations
    > >> >> is
    > >> >> already enough to aggravate it, if it's already injured. I'd recommend
    > >> >> either
    > >> >> cutting it out, or at least look for ways to avoid running too hard
    > >> >> when
    > >> >> you
    > >> >> play it.
    > >> >
    > >> > I'm kinda shocked a runner didn't see the study on tendonitis. Lyle
    > >> > sent
    > >> > me a copy - I applied it and rehabbed the achilles tendonitis that had
    > >> > been bothering me for years.
    > >> >
    > >> > Heavy eccentrics. Use a heavy weight for calf raises using both legs
    > >> > and
    > >> > then switch to the achilles that is bothering you and lower the weight
    > >> > very, very slowly. It sounds crazy, but there was an excellent study
    > >> > done on this technique and it had a higher success rate than other
    > >> > interventions used - most notably drugs.
    > >> >
    > >> > It sounds crazy, but it really works. Do heavy eccentric calf raises
    > >> > daily if you can. If I don't have access to a calf machine I'll do a
    > >> > few
    > >> > reps on the stairs.
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >> Good to know Keith.
    > >>
    > >> Is there any thoughts or theories as to why the eccentrics are so
    > >> effective
    > >> for this application?
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > > Read up on a summary of the study here:
    > >
    > > http://www.sportsinjurybulletin.com/archive/achilles-tendonitis.html
    > >
    > > I don't know about their 'improvement', but here they figure it is the
    > > increase in strength. I'm not sure - I'll look at the study again. I
    > > thought Lyle felt it was a hormonal/protein synthesis response to the
    > > heavy eccentrics which helped heal the inflammation. I could be wrong -
    > > I didn't check out the science.
    > >
    > > Too bad the scientists were largely driven out of MFW, eh?
    > >

    >
    > Word.
    >
    > I always felt that eccentrics were good for rehab. I have certainly used
    > them for both myself and others. But nothing that used very heavy weights.
    > My personal observation was there was minimal swelling or inflamation when
    > using eccentrics. But the sample population and types of injuries rehabbed
    > was quite small.
    >
    > How long did it take for you to rehab the achilles tendon Keith??


    It started improving immediately and was virtually healed in 3 weeks.
    Which I found friggin' amazing as I had been using RICE and NSAIDS for 2
    full years with no luck at all.
    >
    >
    > And did you use heavy weights?


    If I was in the gym I went up to 300 kgs with a one-legged eccentric -
    quite heavy. It is a selectorized stack and I used everything. OTOH I
    can do calf raises with one leg that way. On the seated calf raise I
    used up to 6 45's.

    But now if I feel them starting to tighten I'll go quite a bit lighter
    and just focus on the eccentric and that seems to work well. Or just use
    the protocol the Swedes used and also use a dumbbell or something like
    that. Seems to work just as well.

    So I'm really not sure it is necessary to go as heavy as I did.

    --
    Keith
     
  16. Lee Michaels

    Lee Michaels Guest

    "Hobbes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:
    >
    >> "Hobbes" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>
    >> > In article <[email protected]>,
    >> > "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> "Hobbes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >> news:[email protected]
    >> >> > In article <[email protected]>,
    >> >> > Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >> >
    >> >> >> On 2005-06-28, Sethvir <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >> >> > I'm 46, 6' x 170#, 31" waist, and am very active. I manage the
    >> >> >> > back
    >> >> >> > end of
    >> >> >> > a large retail store, meaning a lot of lifting boxes and walking
    >> >> >> > an
    >> >> >> > average
    >> >> >> > of 15 miles a day (measured). I bike 50+ miles a week road and
    >> >> >> > trail,
    >> >> >> > lift
    >> >> >> > free weights twice a week, and play softball. Overall I'm really
    >> >> >> > happy
    >> >> >> > with
    >> >> >> > my state of fitness and energy level, except...
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> > Lately I've had some pain and swelling in my lower left achilles
    >> >> >> > tendon.
    >> >> >> > Not debilitating, but it really stiffens up when I stop / sit for
    >> >> >> > a
    >> >> >> > while.
    >> >> >> > I get some relief from ibuprophen, and icing helps as well.
    >> >> >> > Anyone
    >> >> >> > have
    >> >> >> > success treating similar symptoms? I understand that "total"
    >> >> >> > rest
    >> >> >> > might be
    >> >> >> > best, but don't want to give up my activities.
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> Keep icing it. Also consider placing a heel lift in your shoe when
    >> >> >> you're
    >> >> >> at
    >> >> >> work -- and be attentive to the footwear you're using at work.
    >> >> >> Walking
    >> >> >> very
    >> >> >> high mileage (15 miles a day is pretty high!) in the wrong shoe
    >> >> >> could
    >> >> >> make it
    >> >> >> worse.
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> Avoid anything that places stress on the tendon. Most of the
    >> >> >> exercises
    >> >> >> you're
    >> >> >> doing should be OK. In particular, lifting and biking should be
    >> >> >> fine.
    >> >> >> I've
    >> >> >> had achilles tendon problems, and lifting weights (even calves)
    >> >> >> didn't
    >> >> >> aggravate
    >> >> >> the injury at all. Softball could be a problem, because it involves
    >> >> >> a
    >> >> >> lot
    >> >> >> of
    >> >> >> fast acceleration from a standstill. Half a dozen or so hard
    >> >> >> accelerations
    >> >> >> is
    >> >> >> already enough to aggravate it, if it's already injured. I'd
    >> >> >> recommend
    >> >> >> either
    >> >> >> cutting it out, or at least look for ways to avoid running too hard
    >> >> >> when
    >> >> >> you
    >> >> >> play it.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > I'm kinda shocked a runner didn't see the study on tendonitis. Lyle
    >> >> > sent
    >> >> > me a copy - I applied it and rehabbed the achilles tendonitis that
    >> >> > had
    >> >> > been bothering me for years.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Heavy eccentrics. Use a heavy weight for calf raises using both legs
    >> >> > and
    >> >> > then switch to the achilles that is bothering you and lower the
    >> >> > weight
    >> >> > very, very slowly. It sounds crazy, but there was an excellent study
    >> >> > done on this technique and it had a higher success rate than other
    >> >> > interventions used - most notably drugs.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > It sounds crazy, but it really works. Do heavy eccentric calf raises
    >> >> > daily if you can. If I don't have access to a calf machine I'll do a
    >> >> > few
    >> >> > reps on the stairs.
    >> >> >
    >> >>
    >> >> Good to know Keith.
    >> >>
    >> >> Is there any thoughts or theories as to why the eccentrics are so
    >> >> effective
    >> >> for this application?
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> > Read up on a summary of the study here:
    >> >
    >> > http://www.sportsinjurybulletin.com/archive/achilles-tendonitis.html
    >> >
    >> > I don't know about their 'improvement', but here they figure it is the
    >> > increase in strength. I'm not sure - I'll look at the study again. I
    >> > thought Lyle felt it was a hormonal/protein synthesis response to the
    >> > heavy eccentrics which helped heal the inflammation. I could be wrong -
    >> > I didn't check out the science.
    >> >
    >> > Too bad the scientists were largely driven out of MFW, eh?
    >> >

    >>
    >> Word.
    >>
    >> I always felt that eccentrics were good for rehab. I have certainly used
    >> them for both myself and others. But nothing that used very heavy
    >> weights.
    >> My personal observation was there was minimal swelling or inflamation
    >> when
    >> using eccentrics. But the sample population and types of injuries
    >> rehabbed
    >> was quite small.
    >>
    >> How long did it take for you to rehab the achilles tendon Keith??

    >
    > It started improving immediately and was virtually healed in 3 weeks.
    > Which I found friggin' amazing as I had been using RICE and NSAIDS for 2
    > full years with no luck at all.
    >>
    >>
    >> And did you use heavy weights?

    >
    > If I was in the gym I went up to 300 kgs with a one-legged eccentric -
    > quite heavy. It is a selectorized stack and I used everything. OTOH I
    > can do calf raises with one leg that way. On the seated calf raise I
    > used up to 6 45's.
    >
    > But now if I feel them starting to tighten I'll go quite a bit lighter
    > and just focus on the eccentric and that seems to work well. Or just use
    > the protocol the Swedes used and also use a dumbbell or something like
    > that. Seems to work just as well.
    >
    > So I'm really not sure it is necessary to go as heavy as I did.
    >


    Good goin' Keith!! I am glad that it worked out so well for you. It seems
    too good to be true.

    That Lyle guy is pretty smart, isn't he?
     
  17. Hobbes

    Hobbes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:

    > "Hobbes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:
    > >
    > >> "Hobbes" <[email protected]> wrote
    > >>
    > >> > In article <[email protected]>,
    > >> > "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >> "Hobbes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> >> news:[email protected]
    > >> >> > In article <[email protected]>,
    > >> >> > Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> >> On 2005-06-28, Sethvir <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >> >> > I'm 46, 6' x 170#, 31" waist, and am very active. I manage the
    > >> >> >> > back
    > >> >> >> > end of
    > >> >> >> > a large retail store, meaning a lot of lifting boxes and walking
    > >> >> >> > an
    > >> >> >> > average
    > >> >> >> > of 15 miles a day (measured). I bike 50+ miles a week road and
    > >> >> >> > trail,
    > >> >> >> > lift
    > >> >> >> > free weights twice a week, and play softball. Overall I'm really
    > >> >> >> > happy
    > >> >> >> > with
    > >> >> >> > my state of fitness and energy level, except...
    > >> >> >> >
    > >> >> >> > Lately I've had some pain and swelling in my lower left achilles
    > >> >> >> > tendon.
    > >> >> >> > Not debilitating, but it really stiffens up when I stop / sit for
    > >> >> >> > a
    > >> >> >> > while.
    > >> >> >> > I get some relief from ibuprophen, and icing helps as well.
    > >> >> >> > Anyone
    > >> >> >> > have
    > >> >> >> > success treating similar symptoms? I understand that "total"
    > >> >> >> > rest
    > >> >> >> > might be
    > >> >> >> > best, but don't want to give up my activities.
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> Keep icing it. Also consider placing a heel lift in your shoe when
    > >> >> >> you're
    > >> >> >> at
    > >> >> >> work -- and be attentive to the footwear you're using at work.
    > >> >> >> Walking
    > >> >> >> very
    > >> >> >> high mileage (15 miles a day is pretty high!) in the wrong shoe
    > >> >> >> could
    > >> >> >> make it
    > >> >> >> worse.
    > >> >> >>
    > >> >> >> Avoid anything that places stress on the tendon. Most of the
    > >> >> >> exercises
    > >> >> >> you're
    > >> >> >> doing should be OK. In particular, lifting and biking should be
    > >> >> >> fine.
    > >> >> >> I've
    > >> >> >> had achilles tendon problems, and lifting weights (even calves)
    > >> >> >> didn't
    > >> >> >> aggravate
    > >> >> >> the injury at all. Softball could be a problem, because it involves
    > >> >> >> a
    > >> >> >> lot
    > >> >> >> of
    > >> >> >> fast acceleration from a standstill. Half a dozen or so hard
    > >> >> >> accelerations
    > >> >> >> is
    > >> >> >> already enough to aggravate it, if it's already injured. I'd
    > >> >> >> recommend
    > >> >> >> either
    > >> >> >> cutting it out, or at least look for ways to avoid running too hard
    > >> >> >> when
    > >> >> >> you
    > >> >> >> play it.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > I'm kinda shocked a runner didn't see the study on tendonitis. Lyle
    > >> >> > sent
    > >> >> > me a copy - I applied it and rehabbed the achilles tendonitis that
    > >> >> > had
    > >> >> > been bothering me for years.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > Heavy eccentrics. Use a heavy weight for calf raises using both legs
    > >> >> > and
    > >> >> > then switch to the achilles that is bothering you and lower the
    > >> >> > weight
    > >> >> > very, very slowly. It sounds crazy, but there was an excellent study
    > >> >> > done on this technique and it had a higher success rate than other
    > >> >> > interventions used - most notably drugs.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > It sounds crazy, but it really works. Do heavy eccentric calf raises
    > >> >> > daily if you can. If I don't have access to a calf machine I'll do a
    > >> >> > few
    > >> >> > reps on the stairs.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Good to know Keith.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Is there any thoughts or theories as to why the eccentrics are so
    > >> >> effective
    > >> >> for this application?
    > >> >>
    > >> >>
    > >> >
    > >> > Read up on a summary of the study here:
    > >> >
    > >> > http://www.sportsinjurybulletin.com/archive/achilles-tendonitis.html
    > >> >
    > >> > I don't know about their 'improvement', but here they figure it is the
    > >> > increase in strength. I'm not sure - I'll look at the study again. I
    > >> > thought Lyle felt it was a hormonal/protein synthesis response to the
    > >> > heavy eccentrics which helped heal the inflammation. I could be wrong -
    > >> > I didn't check out the science.
    > >> >
    > >> > Too bad the scientists were largely driven out of MFW, eh?
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >> Word.
    > >>
    > >> I always felt that eccentrics were good for rehab. I have certainly used
    > >> them for both myself and others. But nothing that used very heavy
    > >> weights.
    > >> My personal observation was there was minimal swelling or inflamation
    > >> when
    > >> using eccentrics. But the sample population and types of injuries
    > >> rehabbed
    > >> was quite small.
    > >>
    > >> How long did it take for you to rehab the achilles tendon Keith??

    > >
    > > It started improving immediately and was virtually healed in 3 weeks.
    > > Which I found friggin' amazing as I had been using RICE and NSAIDS for 2
    > > full years with no luck at all.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> And did you use heavy weights?

    > >
    > > If I was in the gym I went up to 300 kgs with a one-legged eccentric -
    > > quite heavy. It is a selectorized stack and I used everything. OTOH I
    > > can do calf raises with one leg that way. On the seated calf raise I
    > > used up to 6 45's.
    > >
    > > But now if I feel them starting to tighten I'll go quite a bit lighter
    > > and just focus on the eccentric and that seems to work well. Or just use
    > > the protocol the Swedes used and also use a dumbbell or something like
    > > that. Seems to work just as well.
    > >
    > > So I'm really not sure it is necessary to go as heavy as I did.
    > >

    >
    > Good goin' Keith!! I am glad that it worked out so well for you. It seems
    > too good to be true.
    >
    > That Lyle guy is pretty smart, isn't he?
    >


    Yup. The guys ability to research and his voracious reading (and
    comprehension) is outstanding.

    --
    Keith
     
  18. On 2005-06-28, Hobbes <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I don't know about their 'improvement', but here they figure it is the
    > increase in strength. I'm not sure - I'll look at the study again. I
    > thought Lyle felt it was a hormonal/protein synthesis response to the
    > heavy eccentrics which helped heal the inflammation. I could be wrong -
    > I didn't check out the science.


    Lyle's theory sounds like a good one. The reason AT problems are stubborn is
    that there's not much blood flow to that area -- in fact the whole point of
    icing it is to get some circulation there. So an exercise that jump-starts
    a rapid tissue-repair response makes some sense. BTW, it's not the inflammation
    that needs to be heeled, it's actual damage to the tissue-- so when you
    consider that, Lyle's explanation makes sense.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  19. bc

    bc Guest

    Donovan Rebbechi wrote:
    > On 2005-06-28, Hobbes <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I don't know about their 'improvement', but here they figure it is the
    > > increase in strength. I'm not sure - I'll look at the study again. I
    > > thought Lyle felt it was a hormonal/protein synthesis response to the
    > > heavy eccentrics which helped heal the inflammation. I could be wrong -
    > > I didn't check out the science.

    >
    > Lyle's theory sounds like a good one. The reason AT problems are stubborn is
    > that there's not much blood flow to that area -- in fact the whole point of
    > icing it is to get some circulation there. So an exercise that jump-starts
    > a rapid tissue-repair response makes some sense. BTW, it's not the inflammation
    > that needs to be heeled, it's actual damage to the tissue-- so when you
    > consider that, Lyle's explanation makes sense.


    So how can I apply it to the ITB problem (I think) that crops up after
    ever TKD session?

    - bc
     
  20. Hobbes

    Hobbes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "bc" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Donovan Rebbechi wrote:
    > > On 2005-06-28, Hobbes <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > I don't know about their 'improvement', but here they figure it is the
    > > > increase in strength. I'm not sure - I'll look at the study again. I
    > > > thought Lyle felt it was a hormonal/protein synthesis response to the
    > > > heavy eccentrics which helped heal the inflammation. I could be wrong -
    > > > I didn't check out the science.

    > >
    > > Lyle's theory sounds like a good one. The reason AT problems are stubborn
    > > is
    > > that there's not much blood flow to that area -- in fact the whole point of
    > > icing it is to get some circulation there. So an exercise that jump-starts
    > > a rapid tissue-repair response makes some sense. BTW, it's not the
    > > inflammation
    > > that needs to be heeled, it's actual damage to the tissue-- so when you
    > > consider that, Lyle's explanation makes sense.

    >
    > So how can I apply it to the ITB problem (I think) that crops up after
    > ever TKD session?


    I don't think you can. The IT band is a completely different.

    --
    Keith
     
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