Adding Eyelets to a Fork?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Derek Mark Eddi, Apr 16, 2003.

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  1. Hi Folks,

    I have a handlebar mounted bag that I'd like to use on my bike for a few long trips. Unfortunately
    the bike's fork does not have eyelets. It was intended for performance riding. The bag attaches to
    the eyelets using some long elastic cords and "S" hooks.

    Back when I got this bag ('87?) it was not unusual to find eyelet adapters for forks in bike shops.
    I called a few local stores and none of them have any idea what I'm talking about. "Buy a new fork"
    was one recommendation.

    I'm now considering jury rigging something using zip ties. Has anyone seen a product on sale that
    serves this purpose?

    I tried some google searches but nothing turned up. I may not be using the best set of keywords.

    Thanks for any help!

    -dreq
     
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  2. Common these days to find "P clamps" in hardware stores. I think this might do the trick for you.

    GJ

    "Derek Mark Edding" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi Folks,
    >
    > I have a handlebar mounted bag that I'd like to use on my bike for a few long trips. Unfortunately
    > the bike's fork does not have eyelets. It was intended for performance riding. The bag attaches to
    > the eyelets using some long elastic cords and "S" hooks.
    >
    > Back when I got this bag ('87?) it was not unusual to find eyelet adapters for forks in bike
    > shops. I called a few local stores and none of them have any idea what I'm talking about. "Buy a
    > new fork" was one recommendation.
    >
    > I'm now considering jury rigging something using zip ties. Has anyone seen a product on sale that
    > serves this purpose?
    >
    > I tried some google searches but nothing turned up. I may not be using the best set of keywords.
    >
    > Thanks for any help!
    >
    > -dreq
     
  3. Derek Mark Edding wrote:

    > Hi Folks,
    >
    > I have a handlebar mounted bag that I'd like to use on my bike for a few long trips. Unfortunately
    > the bike's fork does not have eyelets. It was intended for performance riding. The bag attaches to
    > the eyelets using some long elastic cords and "S" hooks.
    >
    > Back when I got this bag ('87?) it was not unusual to find eyelet adapters for forks in bike
    > shops. I called a few local stores and none of them have any idea what I'm talking about. "Buy a
    > new fork" was one recommendation.
    >
    > I'm now considering jury rigging something using zip ties. Has anyone seen a product on sale that
    > serves this purpose?
    >
    > I tried some google searches but nothing turned up. I may not be using the best set of keywords.
    >
    > Thanks for any help!
    >
    > -dreq
    >

    i've made fender mount eyelets out of rubber coated 'wire guides'. any hardware store will have
    them. they will work better then zipties but they are still ugly.
     
  4. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Derek Mark Edding" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi Folks,
    >
    > I have a handlebar mounted bag that I'd like to use on my bike for a few long trips. Unfortunately
    > the bike's fork does not have eyelets. It was intended for performance riding. The bag attaches to
    > the eyelets using some long elastic cords and "S" hooks.
    >
    > Back when I got this bag ('87?) it was not unusual to find eyelet adapters for forks in bike
    > shops. I called a few local stores and none of them have any idea what I'm talking about. "Buy a
    > new fork" was one recommendation.
    >
    > I'm now considering jury rigging something using zip ties. Has anyone seen a product on sale that
    > serves this purpose?
    >
    > I tried some google searches but nothing turned up. I may not be using the best set of keywords.

    The two "adapters" which were common for touring equipment in the seventies were Blackburn's little
    aluminum disc that allowed a rack mount within the tringular aperture of a Campagnolo rear frame end
    and also chromed or stainless clips which bolted on to a rack mount and provided a place to latch a
    pannier hook or a handlebar bag stretch cord before Blackburn's "foot" was common on carriers.

    If you need a threaded mounting point on a fork end, those are very simple to braze to the back of
    the blade .

    To simply attach a stretch cord from a handlebar bag I would think a ziptied ring would be adequate.
    There are automotive wiring harness clips ( sometimes called "P-clips" on r.b.t. but I have never
    heard that term elsewhere) that can wrap around the bottom of the blade. You'll need to include a
    clip or ring under the bolt to leave a convenient place to attach the stretch cord. Those clips are
    available at any auto parts house. Ask for wiring clips. They are intended to fasten bundles of
    wires to panels.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  5. I used to have a bag like this, and it was frustrating when I has my Rossin (the last "racing" bike
    I ever bought).

    I finally solved the problem by taking the hooks off and looping the elastic over the front axle
    (between the wheel and the fork)

    Obviously this will only work if the elastic is narrow enough

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  6. Phil Brown

    Phil Brown Guest

    > There are automotive wiring harness clips ( sometimes called "P-clips" on r.b.t. but I have never
    > heard that term elsewhere) that can wrap around the bottom of the blade.

    These are actually called Audel clamps after the firm that invented them and the best ones come from
    aircraft supply houses or surplus houses. Phil Brown
     
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