Adding Links: Risky or not?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by x, Feb 13, 2004.

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  1. x

    x Guest

    The only two chains I've ever had come apart on me under load were new-type chains that come with
    the master links - after I'd fooled around removing, then adding links.

    I'm guessing there's a pretty good reason for those master links.... Is anybody of the opinion that
    it's better to just buy a new chain and trim it to length than to try adding links back into one of
    these puppies? That last failure *really* smarted...
    --
    PeteCresswell
     
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  2. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    (Pete Cresswell) wrote:
    > The only two chains I've ever had come apart on me under load were new-type chains that come with
    > the master links - after I'd fooled around removing, then adding links.
    >
    > I'm guessing there's a pretty good reason for those master links.... Is anybody of the opinion
    > that it's better to just buy a new chain and trim it to length than to try adding links back into
    > one of these puppies? That last failure *really* smarted...

    Use an additional Powerlink to join an extra bit of chain.

    ~PB
     
  3. pete-<< The only two chains I've ever had come apart on me under load were new-type chains that come
    with the master links - after I'd fooled around removing, then adding links. >><BR><BR>

    Chain pins these days are not designed to be pushed out and pushed back in. They are 'soft' and
    deform to the point of not fitting tightly. The only chain that we use w/o a masterlink is the
    Campagnolo 9s one. All others either have a special pin or snaplink.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  4. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 14 Feb 2004 13:52:17 GMT, [email protected] (Qui si parla
    Campagnolo) may have said:

    >pete-<< The only two chains I've ever had come apart on me under load were new-type chains that
    >come with the master links - after I'd fooled around removing, then adding links. >><BR><BR>
    >
    >Chain pins these days are not designed to be pushed out and pushed back in. They are 'soft' and
    >deform to the point of not fitting tightly. The only chain that we use w/o a masterlink is the
    >Campagnolo 9s one. All others either have a special pin or snaplink.

    And, given the price of Shimano's one-use throwaway-or-else "pins", the SRAM Powerlink is a bargain
    in short order if you need to break the chain more often than just to replace it. KMC's cheapie single-
    use non-unsnappable masters are OK for adding links or doing an emergeny rejoin in the field, in my
    opinion, but I'm not too thrilled about using them as the only joining method for a chain that
    doesn't have a breakable link already.

    Not all toolless reusable masters may be good, though; I've heard nasty things said about the
    Wippermann Connex by someone recently. The victim was gently pushing his bike up a trail with chain
    in hand, the Wippermann having apparently flailed open on a bouncy run through the woods. He was
    only able to find half the master after he stopped, and was saying *very* unkind things about the
    experience of the pedals suddenly losing all resistance just as he reached the bottom of a short
    drop into a gully.

    I've never used a Wippermann Connex myself. I think maybe I'll give them a miss.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Yes, I have a killfile. If I don't respond to something,
    it's also possible that I'm busy.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  5. Cat Dailey

    Cat Dailey Guest

    "Werehatrack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On 14 Feb 2004 13:52:17 GMT, [email protected] (Qui si parla Campagnolo) may have said:
    >
    > >pete-<< The only two chains I've ever had come apart on me under load
    were
    > >new-type chains that come with the master links - after I'd fooled around
    removing, then
    > >adding links. >><BR><BR>
    > >
    > >Chain pins these days are not designed to be pushed out and pushed back
    in.
    > >They are 'soft' and deform to the point of not fitting tightly. The only
    chain
    > >that we use w/o a masterlink is the Campagnolo 9s one. All others either
    have a
    > >special pin or snaplink.
    >
    > And, given the price of Shimano's one-use throwaway-or-else "pins", the SRAM Powerlink is a
    > bargain in short order if you need to break the chain more often than just to replace it. KMC's
    > cheapie single-use non-unsnappable masters are OK for adding links or doing an emergeny rejoin in
    > the field, in my opinion, but I'm not too thrilled about using them as the only joining method for
    > a chain that doesn't have a breakable link already.
    >
    > Not all toolless reusable masters may be good, though; I've heard nasty things said about the
    > Wippermann Connex by someone recently. The victim was gently pushing his bike up a trail with
    > chain in hand, the Wippermann having apparently flailed open on a bouncy run through the woods. He
    > was only able to find half the master after he stopped, and was saying *very* unkind things about
    > the experience of the pedals suddenly losing all resistance just as he reached the bottom of a
    > short drop into a gully.
    >
    > I've never used a Wippermann Connex myself. I think maybe I'll give them a miss.
    >
    > --

    Actually, I've used the Connex on my Record 10 sp for about a year with no problems. I do always
    carry a spare in my seatbag, however. I think they are just as good as the SRAM gold ones that I
    used to use on my Dura Ace 9 sp. In fact, the Connex seems a little easier to open when it's really
    dirty. I wouldn't avoid them.

    Cat
     
  6. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Sat, 14 Feb 2004 15:38:08 -0500, "Cat Dailey"
    <[email protected]> may have said:

    >Actually, I've used the Connex on my Record 10 sp for about a year with no problems. I do always
    >carry a spare in my seatbag, however. I think they are just as good as the SRAM gold ones that I
    >used to use on my Dura Ace 9 sp. In fact, the Connex seems a little easier to open when it's really
    >dirty. I wouldn't avoid them.

    On a road bike, particularly with a 10s cassette where the choices are few, I might consider one,
    but the thrashing that the chain gets on an enthusiastically ridden mtb is different. The instance
    cited was of the latter nature. I've heard reports of the Connex being very easy to unhook
    previously, but I hadn't thought that they could come undone as abruptly as seemed to be the case
    for the guy who was pushing out when I ran across him. On a road bike, though, where the whipping
    around is not as pronounced, I doubt that they'd be prone to this sort of thing...and the easy
    unhooking could be handy if it wasn't a liability.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Yes, I have a killfile. If I don't respond to something,
    it's also possible that I'm busy.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  7. If you have a chain that is too short and a spare power link use a chain tool to cut the chain into
    a three lenght and a five lenght and a seven lenght etc then use the short lenghts with both power
    link conecters with the other chain to change the lenght. The older sram chains could be joined with
    a chain tool but the newer chains require twice the force to push the pin out. Shimano chains cant
    be joined with a chain tool.
     
  8. Cipher

    Cipher New Member

    Joined:
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    I have the same set-up, I like the idea of a spare in the seat bag! (Thanks!) ;)
     
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