Adjustable olympic pool bottom?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Bruce W.1, Sep 14, 2003.

  1. Bruce W.1

    Bruce W.1 Guest

    Just visitted a new rec center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. They have an olympic size pool
    where the bottom can be adjusted in shape and depth from 3' to 15'. What's with that? Why would this
    be desireable?

    Thanks for your help.
     
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  2. Mike Edey

    Mike Edey Guest

    Bruce W.1 wrote:
    > Just visitted a new rec center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. They have an olympic size pool
    > where the bottom can be adjusted in shape and depth from 3' to 15'. What's with that? Why would
    > this be desireable?
    >
    > Thanks for your help.

    I find the best local alternative, swim bench aside, is yoga & wall climbing. Rowing is good too,
    but I no longer have access to a any equipment, or a place to row.

    --Mike
     
  3. Mike Edey

    Mike Edey Guest

    Bruce W.1 wrote:

    > Just visitted a new rec center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. They have an olympic size pool
    > where the bottom can be adjusted in shape and depth from 3' to 15'. What's with that? Why would
    > this be desireable?
    >
    > Thanks for your help.

    The university I went too (Lethbridge) also had, in the shallow end, an adjustable bottom. The
    bottom, in conjunction with 2 bulkheads gave the facility a _very_ flexible pool. Parent & tot
    lessons to scuba classes & everything in between.

    --Mike
     
  4. There are quite a few of those adjustable bottom pools in The Netherlands. Here they are very useful
    for different groups, and some bottoms can be lifted all the way to the top as to make an isolation
    layer over the water.

    Bruce W.1 wrote:

    > Just visitted a new rec center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. They have an olympic size pool
    > where the bottom can be adjusted in shape and depth from 3' to 15'. What's with that? Why would
    > this be desireable?
    >
    > Thanks for your help.
     
  5. Chris

    Chris Guest

    "Bruce W.1" wrote:
    > Just visitted a new rec center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. They have an olympic size pool
    > where the bottom can be adjusted in shape and depth from 3' to 15'. What's with that? Why would
    > this be desireable?

    I guess the reason is to allow more flexibility in the use of the pool.

    Tokyo Tatsumi International Swimming Pool, the venue for many masters events in Tokyo, has a main
    pool with a bottom that ranges from 1.4 to 3 meters. For open swimming they keep 3/4s of the pool at
    2 meters and
    1/4 at 1.4. meters. You can practice dive starts in one lane. Sometimes they have the whole pool set
    to 1.4 meters. I've never seen it set to 3 meters. Annoyingly, for masters meets they set it to
    1.4 or 1.6, which I think would make dive starts more dangerous for the relatively inexperienced
    masters swimmers. Since Tatsumi has a second 50-meter pool that is a fixed 1.2 to
    2.4 meter depth, I don't really understand why they just didn't make the main pool a fixed 2
    or 3 meters.

    I would love to be able to experience swimming in 3 meter water, but they seem to not want to use
    that setting. At the Chiba International General Swimming Center, they use the 5-meter deep,
    25-meter square diving pool as the warm-up pool during meets, and that is really fun to swim in, for
    some mysterious psychological reason.
     
  6. "Bruce W.1" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Just visitted a new rec center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. They have an olympic size pool
    > where the bottom can be adjusted in shape and depth from 3' to 15'. What's with that? Why would
    > this be desireable?
    >
    > Thanks for your help.

    My kids play Water Polo. They have competed in the UK in a couple of these pools - it is hard on
    Phil, my eldest, who plays goalie, and usually gets to stand in the shallow end - with these pools
    they literally take the floor from under you!
     
  7. J. Sterling

    J. Sterling Guest

    "Mike Edey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Bruce W.1 wrote:
    >
    > > Just visitted a new rec center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. They have an olympic size
    > > pool where the bottom can be adjusted in shape and depth from 3' to 15'. What's with that? Why
    > > would this be desireable?
    >
    > The university I went too (Lethbridge) also had, in the shallow end, an adjustable bottom. The
    > bottom, in conjunction with 2 bulkheads gave the facility a _very_ flexible pool.

    I swam in the pool used for the swimming events at the Montreal Olympic Games, and it had
    what I think they called a portable bottom, which made a part of the pool available for
    lessons and such.
     
  8. Chris

    Chris Guest

    Carole Benton wrote:
    > My kids play Water Polo. They have competed in the UK in a couple of these pools - it is hard on
    > Phil, my eldest, who plays goalie, and usually gets to stand in the shallow end - with these pools
    > they literally take the floor from under you!

    The pool needs to be 1.8 meters deep (preferably 2 meters) to be in compliance with FINA rules. The
    skill of constantly sculling with your arms and legs to stay about the surface is a key skill for
    water polo and is the reason why these guys are in such good shape.

    There is a male synchronized swimming group in Japan that goes around doing exhibitions. There was a
    movie made about them, and now there is a television series (described here in English:
    http://www.fujitv.co.jp/en/program/new_prog/d_waterboys.html ). These guys are doing their synchro
    in 1.4 meter deep pools though. They can stand on the bottom and launch themselves or other members
    into the air. From an athletic standpoint, the women who perform in deep pools are much more
    impressive. One of the coaches at my swimming center said that the lung capacity of the women
    synchro swimmers is almost double that of elite male competitive swimmers.
     
  9. Mike Edey

    Mike Edey Guest

    j. sterling wrote:
    > "Mike Edey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>Bruce W.1 wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Just visitted a new rec center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. They have an olympic size
    >>>pool where the bottom can be adjusted in shape and depth from 3' to 15'. What's with that? Why
    >>>would this be desireable?
    >>
    >>The university I went too (Lethbridge) also had, in the shallow end, an adjustable bottom. The
    >>bottom, in conjunction with 2 bulkheads gave the facility a _very_ flexible pool.
    >
    >
    > I swam in the pool used for the swimming events at the Montreal Olympic Games, and it had
    > what I think they called a portable bottom, which made a part of the pool available for
    > lessons and such.
    >
    >
    mmm, the only time I've been there was for trials, though they did have, IIRC, some mesh thing, you
    could stand on, during workouts before the meet

    --Mike
     
  10. Ivan Wingate

    Ivan Wingate Guest

    The one in Melbourne, Australia, is like that. It is actually a 75m pool with two booms so it can
    have a 50m with a 25m at either end, or three 25s, or as is done for Fina World Cups, the centre 25
    is for competition and the floor on the end 25 is raised above water level to form a stage for the
    presentations.

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > There are quite a few of those adjustable bottom pools in The Netherlands. Here they are very
    > useful for different groups, and some bottoms can be lifted all the way to the top as to make an
    > isolation layer over the
    water.
    >
    >
    > Bruce W.1 wrote:
    >
    > > Just visitted a new rec center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. They have an olympic size
    > > pool where the bottom can be adjusted in shape and depth from 3' to 15'. What's with that? Why
    > > would this be desireable?
    > >
    > > Thanks for your help.
     
  11. Chris

    Chris Guest

    IVAN WINGATE wrote:
    > The one in Melbourne, Australia, is like that. It is actually a 75m pool with two booms so it can
    > have a 50m with a 25m at either end, or three 25s, or as is done for Fina World Cups, the centre
    > 25 is for competition and the floor on the end 25 is raised above water level to form a stage for
    > the presentations.

    Do they ever open it up for swimming the whole 75-meter length? It could open up a whole new set of
    world records, perfect for swimmers with bad turns.
     
  12. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    I Hope you don't meant it personal!!!

    citius altius fortius

    "Chris" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    news:[email protected]...
    > IVAN WINGATE wrote:
    > > The one in Melbourne, Australia, is like that. It is actually a 75m
    pool
    > > with two booms so it can have a 50m with a 25m at either end, or three
    25s,
    > > or as is done for Fina World Cups, the centre 25 is for competition and
    the
    > > floor on the end 25 is raised above water level to form a stage for the presentations.
    >
    > Do they ever open it up for swimming the whole 75-meter length? It could open up a whole new set
    > of world records, perfect for swimmers with bad turns.
     
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