Adjusting brake levers help please

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Tim Green, Jan 20, 2006.

  1. Tim Green

    Tim Green Guest

    Hi all, I just brought my girlfriend a secondhand elcheapo Kmart put
    together mountain bike.

    Its in great nick, like new.
    Ok my question is, is it possible to make the brake lever reach closer, as
    my girlfriend has tiny hands, and cannot reach comfortably to the brake
    levers.

    If it can be done, can you please give me simple step by step instructions
    on as how to adjust them.

    Thanks so much.
     
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  2. flyingdutch

    flyingdutch New Member

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    on 'some' brake levers it's possible but in the great world of
    'yooz gt's what you pays for' I doubt this paricular bike will have the relevant
    small allen bolt or screw for the adjustment
     
  3. Random Data

    Random Data Guest

    On Sat, 21 Jan 2006 16:11:38 +1000, Tim Green wrote:

    > Ok my question is, is it possible to make the brake lever reach closer, as
    > my girlfriend has tiny hands, and cannot reach comfortably to the brake
    > levers.


    On a K-mart bike the levers may not offer this option. Look for a small
    adjustment screw either near where the cable comes out of the lever, or
    behind the lever blade, looking at the pivot. Wind this in and the reach
    should be reduced.
    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    Random miscellany, as opposed to that other kind of miscellany
    - Patrick Shaughnessy
     
  4. ray

    ray Guest

    Tim Green wrote:
    > Hi all, I just brought my girlfriend a secondhand elcheapo Kmart put
    > together mountain bike.
    >
    > Its in great nick, like new.
    > Ok my question is, is it possible to make the brake lever reach closer, as
    > my girlfriend has tiny hands, and cannot reach comfortably to the brake
    > levers.
    >
    > If it can be done, can you please give me simple step by step instructions
    > on as how to adjust them.
    >
    > Thanks so much.
    >
    >

    Greetings.
    The distance of brake levers from handle-bars is generally fixed by
    design of bike in the first place. The brakes will pull further in as
    the pads wear down.
    The brake lever travel can be adjusted as they wear, but the levers
    themselves remain in the same position. I have this problem as well, the
    ergonomics people seem to assume one size fits all.
    Regards,
    Ray.
     
  5. stu

    stu Guest

    "Tim Green" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi all, I just brought my girlfriend a secondhand elcheapo Kmart put
    > together mountain bike.
    >
    > Its in great nick, like new.
    > Ok my question is, is it possible to make the brake lever reach closer, as
    > my girlfriend has tiny hands, and cannot reach comfortably to the brake
    > levers.
    >
    > If it can be done, can you please give me simple step by step instructions
    > on as how to adjust them.
    >
    > Thanks so much.
    >

    just to prove i have to much time on my hands, here is a pic of the brake
    lever reach adjustment on my MTB
    http://members.optusnet.com.au/ashtar123/

    doing it up moves the lever back, but you might have to back off the cable
    adjustment if you want it to move a long way.


    (I've toyed with the idea of making something so i can lock the lever back
    easily as a sort of lock on handbrake........ i don't think anyone would
    steal my bike if they had to carry it far)

    Stu

    if there anyone out there with quick fire levers that wont shift right? i've
    had to fix a couple and its pretty easy (if they all stuff up the same way
    and are the same inside)
     
  6. Random Data

    Random Data Guest

    On Sat, 21 Jan 2006 22:59:52 +1100, stu wrote:

    > (I've toyed with the idea of making something so i can lock the lever
    > back easily as a sort of lock on handbrake........ i don't think anyone
    > would steal my bike if they had to carry it far)


    It's called a zip tie. Or a bandanna.

    > if there anyone out there with quick fire levers that wont shift right?
    > i've had to fix a couple and its pretty easy (if they all stuff up the
    > same way and are the same inside)


    Depends. The most common failure I've found is that one of the ratchet
    pawl springs is loose, so one or the other lever won't engage properly.
    Fix is to pull the spring back a bit, so it's got more tension. Option 2
    is the shifter full of crap that just won't do anything, and liberal doses
    of WD-40 or similar seem to fix that pretty well.

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    "If you're bored, find something and break it" Jamie Rapson - 1996
     
  7. stu

    stu Guest

    "Random Data" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > On Sat, 21 Jan 2006 22:59:52 +1100, stu wrote:
    >
    > > (I've toyed with the idea of making something so i can lock the lever
    > > back easily as a sort of lock on handbrake........ i don't think anyone
    > > would steal my bike if they had to carry it far)

    >
    > It's called a zip tie. Or a bandanna.

    but you wouldnt have to be a master criminal to get that off

    > > if there anyone out there with quick fire levers that wont shift right?
    > > i've had to fix a couple and its pretty easy (if they all stuff up the
    > > same way and are the same inside)

    >
    > Depends. The most common failure I've found is that one of the ratchet
    > pawl springs is loose, so one or the other lever won't engage properly.
    > Fix is to pull the spring back a bit, so it's got more tension. Option 2
    > is the shifter full of crap that just won't do anything, and liberal doses
    > of WD-40 or similar seem to fix that pretty well.


    the ones i have seen the ratchet pawl* cocks up on and angle and wont engage
    the plate, just needs a .5mm washer in the right place.
     
  8. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    Tim Green wrote:
    >
    > Hi all, I just brought my girlfriend a secondhand elcheapo Kmart put
    > together mountain bike.

    <Snip>

    Shame on you! Don't you love her? Girls don't want Kmart specials, they
    want carbon - either as diamonds or as CF bikes!

    Tam
     
  9. Euan

    Euan Guest

    Tamyka Bell <[email protected]> writes:

    > Tim Green wrote:
    >>
    >> Hi all, I just brought my girlfriend a secondhand elcheapo Kmart put
    >> together mountain bike.

    > <Snip>
    >
    > Shame on you! Don't you love her? Girls don't want Kmart specials, they
    > want carbon - either as diamonds or as CF bikes!


    Now there's one for the quote file.
    --
    Cheers | ~~ [email protected]
    Euan | ~~ _-\<,
    Melbourne, Australia | ~ (*)/ (*)
     
  10. Random Data

    Random Data Guest

    On Sat, 21 Jan 2006 23:18:18 +1100, stu wrote:

    > but you wouldnt have to be a master criminal to get that off


    Your average bike thief isn't a master criminal. They can get through
    locks very quickly, or just chuck the bike into their van. Lock your bike
    to something solid with a decent lock, or stay with it. A handbrake is
    useful to leave the bike propped up on sloping ground, but that's about it.

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    "The problem with people whose minds are in the gutter is that they keep
    blocking my periscope."
     
  11. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On 2006-01-23, Random Data (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > On Sat, 21 Jan 2006 23:18:18 +1100, stu wrote:
    >
    >> but you wouldnt have to be a master criminal to get that off

    >
    > Your average bike thief isn't a master criminal. They can get through
    > locks very quickly, or just chuck the bike into their van. Lock your bike
    > to something solid with a decent lock, or stay with it. A handbrake is
    > useful to leave the bike propped up on sloping ground, but that's about it.


    The one time I used the handbrake for this purpose was when I came
    back from a BR, urgently needed to do the shopping (um, whoops, in my
    daze home tonight, I rode right past the shops. I /won't/ be going
    back to get the stuff I need), and had no lock.

    The purpose of doing a handbraky in this situation, combined with
    putting the bike inside the supermarket, was so that any removal would
    entail the theif picking up the bike from inside the shop, and moving
    it out to their car. I would hope that:
    1) Picking up a bike instead of wheeling it would just be /too/
    suspicious for most people not to act.
    2) Security cameras might at least give me half a chance of recovery.

    --
    TimC
    NOT A CHANCE! I know for a *fact* the kittens aren't frightened
    by temporal anomalies. Clock watching simply ain't their bag.
    John Schmidt in ARK
     
  12. Random Data

    Random Data Guest

    On Mon, 23 Jan 2006 08:52:46 +0000, TimC wrote:

    > The one time I used the handbrake for this purpose was when I came back
    > from a BR, urgently needed to do the shopping (um, whoops, in my daze
    > home tonight, I rode right past the shops. I /won't/ be going back to
    > get the stuff I need), and had no lock.


    Yeah, but you knew you were taking a bigger risk than with a real lock,
    which you normally use. You can get away with leaving your front door
    unlocked as well, most of the time.

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    Like most computer techie people, I'll happily spend 6 hours trying to
    figure out how to do a 3 hour job in 10 minutes. --Rev. James Cort
     
  13. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On 2006-01-23, Random Data (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > On Mon, 23 Jan 2006 08:52:46 +0000, TimC wrote:
    >
    >> The one time I used the handbrake for this purpose was when I came back
    >> from a BR, urgently needed to do the shopping (um, whoops, in my daze
    >> home tonight, I rode right past the shops. I /won't/ be going back to
    >> get the stuff I need), and had no lock.

    >
    > Yeah, but you knew you were taking a bigger risk than with a real lock,
    > which you normally use. You can get away with leaving your front door
    > unlocked as well, most of the time.


    So does anyone else have those days when you arrive home to find the
    front door as open as it could be? I used to do it to the side door
    all the time, but don't keep that open anymore, because the cats keep
    outwitting me and always find a way to open the screen door, no matter
    how bolted down it is (hmmm, I think I have outsmarted /them/ for the
    past week. When will they discover the new "latch"?).

    --
    TimC
    "I give up," said Pierre de Fermat's friend. "How DO you keep a
    mathematician busy for 350 years?"
     
  14. Kathy

    Kathy Guest

    TimC wrote:

    > On 2006-01-23, Random Data (aka Bruce)
    > was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    >
    >>On Mon, 23 Jan 2006 08:52:46 +0000, TimC wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>The one time I used the handbrake for this purpose was when I came back
    >>>from a BR, urgently needed to do the shopping (um, whoops, in my daze
    >>>home tonight, I rode right past the shops. I /won't/ be going back to
    >>>get the stuff I need), and had no lock.

    >>
    >>Yeah, but you knew you were taking a bigger risk than with a real lock,
    >>which you normally use. You can get away with leaving your front door
    >>unlocked as well, most of the time.

    >
    >
    > So does anyone else have those days when you arrive home to find the
    > front door as open as it could be? I used to do it to the side door
    > all the time, but don't keep that open anymore, because the cats keep
    > outwitting me and always find a way to open the screen door, no matter
    > how bolted down it is (hmmm, I think I have outsmarted /them/ for the
    > past week. When will they discover the new "latch"?).
    >


    Yeah I do. But then I give myself a good kicking. TIll I beg myself to
    stop and promise not to do it anymore. Then I kick myself once more to
    make sure I get the message.

    Stops me doing it for a year or so.

    I am avaliable for hired kickings Tim

    Dave
     
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