Adjusting Campag Gears



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E

Ed

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Everytime I change chain & cassette, I have a terrible job to get gear selection adjusted
successfully on all 9 cogs. I'm using the official Campag 9-speed chain, Mirage cassette, and Mirage
9-speed rear mech with matching ergos, so you'd think it would all mesh beautifully together, but it
doesn't. If I adjust for the small cogs, I find the gear changes are imprecise for the larger cogs
and vice versa. It's actually dangerous because a missed gear change under load can be scary. It's
almost as if the cog spacers are wrongly sized, but again they are all identical original equipment.
In time it does seem to settle down, but surely the pros don't have to "run-in" their chains before
a race? Anyone have a solution?
 
J

Jtn

Guest
its hard enough with record and chorus, I wouldn't even think about it with your stuff....sorry....
the best thing to do is take it all off and wash it good, lube it, then put shimano ultegra back on.
send the other stuff back to sender...

"Ed" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Everytime I change chain & cassette, I have a terrible job to get gear selection adjusted
> successfully on all 9 cogs. I'm using the official Campag 9-speed chain, Mirage cassette, and
> Mirage 9-speed rear mech with matching ergos, so you'd think it would all mesh beautifully
> together, but it doesn't. If I adjust for the small cogs, I find the gear changes are imprecise
> for the larger cogs and vice versa. It's actually dangerous because a missed gear change under
> load can be scary. It's almost as if the cog spacers are wrongly sized, but again they are all
> identical original equipment. In time it does seem to settle down, but surely the pros don't have
> to "run-in" their chains before a race? Anyone have a solution?
 
E

Ed

Guest
As a Campag devotee I think you're being a little harse. Actually someone sent me the solution - I
had the cable on the wrong side of the anchor bolt. Once repositioned it on the correct side, under
the little groove on the washer, it was perfect. Otherwise only some of the gears run smoothly.
 
R

Robert Brown

Guest
Ed wrote:

> Everytime I change chain & cassette, I have a terrible job to get gear selection adjusted
> successfully on all 9 cogs. I'm using the official Campag 9-speed chain, Mirage cassette, and
> Mirage 9-speed rear mech with matching ergos, so you'd think it would all mesh beautifully
> together, but it doesn't. If I adjust for the small cogs, I find the gear changes are imprecise
> for the larger cogs and vice versa. It's actually dangerous because a missed gear change under
> load can be scary. It's almost as if the cog spacers are wrongly sized, but again they are all
> identical original equipment. In time it does seem to settle down, but surely the pros don't have
> to "run-in" their chains before a race? Anyone have a solution?

I had similar with a Veloce gruppo. There are two things that I did, that worked for me:

1. Twisted the derailleur hanger slightly (put an allen key in the DR mounting bolt and gave a
gentle tug in some specific direction) so that the cage fed the chain at a better angle
(determining just what angle that would be, I will leave as an exercise to the reader ;-)

2. Tightened the cassette lockring to the right torque, squashing the sprockets together to the
right distance.

YMMV though . . .

/Robert
 
A

Aguy

Guest
These two suggestions sound awful to me, and brutal to the bike. If you are using a stepped gear
lever, which cannot be adjusted, then for your sake make those adjustments by changing the spacers
between the rings. Check with a real mechanic.
 
R

Robert Brown

Guest
aguy wrote:

> These two suggestions sound awful to me, and brutal to the bike. If you are using a stepped gear
> lever, which cannot be adjusted, then for your sake make those adjustments by changing the spacers
> between the rings. Check with a real mechanic.

Total rubbish. If he is using a Mirage derailleur and 9s cassette, including, the corresponding
spacers, then these will not need to be changed.

50 Nm is roughly half that required to secure a car wheel bolt, so the force is significant. But
brutal? ROFL.

People often set their cassette lockrings too loose, so that there is a little space between the
sprockets. If shifting at one end of the cassette is good, then chances are that it will be somewhat
off, at the other end. The lockring pushes the rings together, to the right distance. A couple of
tenths of a millimetre could make enough of a difference.

If the hanger is positioning the derailleur out of plane relative to the chain line (the plane
formed in relation to 5th sprocket and space between front rings), then it seems a good idea to fix
that as well. Bend it until it's in line. If it's already close to in line, then leave it alone.

Taking action as above fixed my shifting worries, and they have not come back. How did you resolve
*your* shifting problems, Mr. Aguy?

/Robert
 
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