Adjusting headsets

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by PJay, Apr 27, 2006.

  1. PJay

    PJay Guest

    I've posted about headsets before but I'm starting to get into doing my own
    maintainence and somewhat lacking in confidence so thought I'd double check.
    Learning from books/DVDs is okay but however good they are, it can't be the
    same as having someone who knows what they're doing actually tell you that
    you've done it right!

    I've tended to be a tad nervous about headset adjustment (standard 1 1/8th
    threadless type) as I picked up the notion somewhere that a loose headset
    might cause headtube ovalisation and I'm a bit worried that I might not get
    things 100% right. A bit of question asking and research suggests that this
    probably isn't the case (although a loose headset might make ovalisation
    easier in instances of hard frontal impact) so I'm a bit more comfortable
    about having a go. I just wanted to check that I needn't worry about headset
    ovalisation (and I can't imagine that I could get things too badly wrong)
    and whether it really is as simple as removing all detectable play and
    tightening up the stem.


    Sorry if this is basic stuff but it's good to be sure.
     
    Tags:


  2. landotter

    landotter Guest

    Headsets are simple. Lock front brake, rock bike back and forth. Play?
    Too loose. Tighten. No play? See if bars turn smoothly with wheel off
    ground. Smooth? Go ride. Not smooth? Service or loosen.


    It's really that simple.
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    "PJay" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I've posted about headsets before but I'm starting to get into doing my own
    > maintainence and somewhat lacking in confidence so thought I'd double check.
    > Learning from books/DVDs is okay but however good they are, it can't be the
    > same as having someone who knows what they're doing actually tell you that
    > you've done it right!
    >
    > I've tended to be a tad nervous about headset adjustment (standard 1 1/8th
    > threadless type) as I picked up the notion somewhere that a loose headset
    > might cause headtube ovalisation and I'm a bit worried that I might not get
    > things 100% right. A bit of question asking and research suggests that this
    > probably isn't the case (although a loose headset might make ovalisation
    > easier in instances of hard frontal impact) so I'm a bit more comfortable
    > about having a go. I just wanted to check that I needn't worry about headset
    > ovalisation (and I can't imagine that I could get things too badly wrong)
    > and whether it really is as simple as removing all detectable play and
    > tightening up the stem.


    "Ovalization" only happens to integrated headsets.
    What is an integrated head set? Look it up.

    A badly adjusted headset can damage the balls or races.
    The latter is the more serious eventuality, since it would
    mean replacing all races including the fork crown race.
    But do not worry; adjusting the headset is easy, and at
    worse a bit tedious if you have to follow the method of
    successive approximations.

    --
    Michael Press
     
  4. "landotter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Headsets are simple. Lock front brake, rock bike back and forth. Play?
    > Too loose. Tighten. No play? See if bars turn smoothly with wheel off
    > ground. Smooth? Go ride. Not smooth? Service or loosen.
    >
    >
    > It's really that simple.


    Another method I seen recommended (Park Tools I think) suggested lifting the
    bike up so the front wheel lower than the rear. Turn the wheel to the side
    and let it go. The headset should be loose enough so that the wheel/fork
    return to the middle, but not so loose that it swings back and forth until
    it stops in the center.

    I use landotter's method to make sure it is tight enough, and I check to
    make sure it isn't too tight with this method.

    HTH
     
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