Adjusting preload

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Dave Smith, Oct 4, 2003.

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  1. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    First, I want to thank the group for helping me to get a great fork. I was trying to decide between
    a Manitou and a Rockshox and a couple folks suggested checking out Fox forks. I did and got a
    Vanilla RL from BeyondBikes.com and I'm VERY happy with it.

    I'm fine tuning it now and I wonder about adjusting the preload. I'm using it at 100mm, it has
    the medium spring and I weigh about 160. The manual says to adjust it so it has about 15mm of sag
    when I sit on
    it. I've found this very difficult to do in practice. I get a different amount of sag every time I
    try it, I guess due to variables in how I sit on it and dismount before I take the measurment.
    I've also heard that one can set preload so the fork reaches 10mm less than the maximum travel
    on the hardest hit I expect it to take. I've tried that and it seems to make more sense to me
    and I like the way the fork feels at this setting. I'm interested in other folks' opinions.

    Thanks very much.
     
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  2. Jamie

    Jamie Guest

    Put a zip tie around the leg if your getting 80mm of travel or better then you have it set right.

    --
    J/O Trailblazer At large !!
     
  3. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > First, I want to thank the group for helping me to get a great fork. I was trying to decide
    > between a Manitou and a Rockshox and a couple folks suggested checking out Fox forks. I did and
    > got a Vanilla RL from BeyondBikes.com and I'm VERY happy with it.
    >
    > I'm fine tuning it now and I wonder about adjusting the preload. I'm using it at 100mm, it has the
    > medium spring and I weigh about 160. The manual says to adjust it so it has about 15mm of sag when
    > I sit on
    > it. I've found this very difficult to do in practice. I get a different amount of sag every time
    > I try it, I guess due to variables in how I sit on it and dismount before I take the
    > measurment. I've also heard that one can set preload so the fork reaches 10mm less than the
    > maximum travel on the hardest hit I expect it to take. I've tried that and it seems to make
    > more sense to me and I like the way the fork feels at this setting. I'm interested in other
    > folks' opinions.
    >
    > Thanks very much.

    Preventing the fork from bottoming is not the only concern with springs. If you're a predominantly
    x-c rider and don't have many big hits, you can afford to set the fork up softer if you like to have
    a smoother ride. If you're a big-hit kinda rider, you need to worry about the bottoming a little
    more. If you like a stiffer fork, you can spring it up and go that way. I personally like a stiffer
    fork and put heavier springs in with thicker oil for more damping. I'm certain my fork won't bottom,
    but it's not exactly plush. But that's good for me. Other people may like the softer fork. It's
    really up to you.

    Sag is usually the more correct measurement as you then know the fork is working in the correct
    range. As long as the forks doesn't REGULARLY bottom out, you're better off with using sag as your
    setup parameter. Again though, it's really what you like. In motorcycle racing, two guys can setup a
    bike completely differently and still think it's good for them. It really depends on riding style,
    comfort, whatever.

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  4. David Kunz

    David Kunz Guest

    S. Anderson wrote:

    > "Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>First, I want to thank the group for helping me to get a great fork. I was trying to decide
    >>between a Manitou and a Rockshox and a couple folks suggested checking out Fox forks. I did and
    >>got a Vanilla RL from BeyondBikes.com and I'm VERY happy with it.
    >>
    >>I'm fine tuning it now and I wonder about adjusting the preload. I'm using it at 100mm, it has the
    >>medium spring and I weigh about 160. The manual says to adjust it so it has about 15mm of sag when
    >>I sit on
    >>it. I've found this very difficult to do in practice. I get a different amount of sag every time
    >> I try it, I guess due to variables in how I sit on it and dismount before I take the
    >> measurment. I've also heard that one can set preload so the fork reaches 10mm less than the
    >> maximum travel on the hardest hit I expect it to take. I've tried that and it seems to make
    >> more sense to me and I like the way the fork feels at this setting. I'm interested in other
    >> folks' opinions.
    >>
    >>Thanks very much.
    >
    >
    > Preventing the fork from bottoming is not the only concern with springs. If you're a predominantly
    > x-c rider and don't have many big hits, you can afford to set the fork up softer if you like to
    > have a smoother ride. If you're a big-hit kinda rider, you need to worry about the bottoming a
    > little more. If you like a stiffer fork, you can spring it up and go that way. I personally like a
    > stiffer fork and put heavier springs in with thicker oil for more damping. I'm certain my fork
    > won't bottom, but it's not exactly plush. But that's good for me. Other people may like the softer
    > fork. It's really up to you.
    >
    > Sag is usually the more correct measurement as you then know the fork is working in the correct
    > range. As long as the forks doesn't REGULARLY bottom out, you're better off with using sag as your
    > setup parameter. Again though, it's really what you like. In motorcycle racing, two guys can setup
    > a bike completely differently and still think it's good for them. It really depends on riding
    > style, comfort, whatever.

    I agree with the above. BUT :)))
    - I've read that you should set them to bottom at least once per ride (a rubber band tied around the
    downtube and initially set all the way down will tell you what your deepest compression is).
    - In practice, I find that's too soft for my style of riding so I set them harder.

    I'd use the above as a guide and tune them as you gain experience! I find firmer is better (for me)
    in technical terrain, and softer is good when I'm just out for a "relaxing" ride.

    David
     
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