adrenaline road rage

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by dreaded, Jul 24, 2004.

  1. dreaded

    dreaded Guest

    it was hot today. 95 degrees in the shade in seattle is a rare thing indeed.
    the asphalt street is slick from heat and no shade at the stoplights.
    commuting through downtown with a full pack and overheating i concentrate
    and take my lane -downtown there are no vehicles faster than mine- and some
    motorist races by about two feet to my left laying on the horn just as he
    passes. a fuse blew, maybe a small aneurism ocurred, the radiator in my head
    blew it's cap. i reacted readying myself for rolling over a car as he passed
    laughing. then with nothing to crash into and an adrenalin glut the finger
    goes up and obscenities roll. i followed up to the stop. two tough looking
    guys, windows down i yelled "what the f*** are you doing?". he said "i was
    just messing with you man". i said something about if he wanted to see me
    get killed that's a good way to do it. i think it was the heat, but really i
    could have gone down just in the reaction to being startled like that. damn
    it's hard to just be defensive sometimes! why do people always pull crap
    like that in groups?
    -a
     
    Tags:


  2. Fx199

    Fx199 Guest

    >Subject: adrenaline road rage
    >From: "dreaded" [email protected]
    >Date: 7/24/2004 10:26 PM US Eastern Standard Time
    >Message-id: <[email protected]>
    >
    >it was hot today. 95 degrees in the shade in seattle is a rare thing indeed.
    >the asphalt street is slick from heat and no shade at the stoplights.
    >commuting through downtown with a full pack and overheating i concentrate
    >and take my lane -downtown there are no vehicles faster than mine- and some
    >motorist races by about two feet to my left laying on the horn just as he
    >passes. a fuse blew, maybe a small aneurism ocurred, the radiator in my head
    >blew it's cap. i reacted readying myself for rolling over a car as he passed
    >laughing. then with nothing to crash into and an adrenalin glut the finger
    >goes up and obscenities roll. i followed up to the stop. two tough looking
    >guys, windows down i yelled "what the f*** are you doing?". he said "i was
    >just messing with you man". i said something about if he wanted to see me
    >get killed that's a good way to do it. i think it was the heat, but really i
    >could have gone down just in the reaction to being startled like that. damn
    >it's hard to just be defensive sometimes! why do people always pull crap
    >like that in groups?
    >-a
    >


    Yep, they're usually not alone, I've noticed that....
     
  3. curt

    curt Guest

    :( I always heard Washington was one of the best bicycle states as far as
    friendly people go. That bums me out to hear about crap like that out you
    way. It is expected in the North East US with how aggressive we are over
    here. :(

    Curt


    "dreaded" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > it was hot today. 95 degrees in the shade in seattle is a rare thing

    indeed.
    > the asphalt street is slick from heat and no shade at the stoplights.
    > commuting through downtown with a full pack and overheating i concentrate
    > and take my lane -downtown there are no vehicles faster than mine- and

    some
    > motorist races by about two feet to my left laying on the horn just as he
    > passes. a fuse blew, maybe a small aneurism ocurred, the radiator in my

    head
    > blew it's cap. i reacted readying myself for rolling over a car as he

    passed
    > laughing. then with nothing to crash into and an adrenalin glut the finger
    > goes up and obscenities roll. i followed up to the stop. two tough looking
    > guys, windows down i yelled "what the f*** are you doing?". he said "i was
    > just messing with you man". i said something about if he wanted to see me
    > get killed that's a good way to do it. i think it was the heat, but really

    i
    > could have gone down just in the reaction to being startled like that.

    damn
    > it's hard to just be defensive sometimes! why do people always pull crap
    > like that in groups?
    > -a
    >
    >
     
  4. curt wrote:
    > :( I always heard Washington was one of the best bicycle states as far as
    > friendly people go. That bums me out to hear about crap like that out you
    > way. It is expected in the North East US with how aggressive we are over
    > here. :(


    The part of NY I live in isn't bad. My husband and I rode for over an
    hour yesterday on a road that goes straight through the middle of town;
    we only got honked at once (by someone in a pickup truck, gee, what a
    surprise), and the guy who yelled at me was asking if I knew where the
    Home Depot was. But I have to admit, it's a marked county bike route,
    and cyclists are a common sight.

    -km

    --
    the black rose
    GO LANCE GO!!!
    proud to be owned by a yorkie
    http://community.webshots.com/user/blackrosequilts
     
  5. From: [email protected] (curt)

    :mad: I always heard Washington was one of
    >the best bicycle states as far as friendly
    >people go. That bums me out to hear
    >about crap like that out you way. It is
    >expected in the North East US with how
    >aggressive we are over here. :(


    >Curt


    I don't live in a big city any more (Thank the biking gods!), and maybe
    that's the main difference. But I got honked at yesterday on a metric
    century, and as best as I can figure, it's the fourth horn I've heard
    honked in anger since moving here in 2001...

    - -

    "May you have the wind at your back.
    And a really low gear for the hills!"

    Chris Zacho ~ "Your Friendly Neighborhood Wheelman"

    Chris'Z Corner
    http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  6. dreaded

    dreaded Guest

    i like it here but seattle is full of posers. there's this kind of
    superficial friendliness/passive agressiveness that dominates (i think
    that's part of why nobody ever messes with me unless they're in a group!). i
    think that on the east coast people are more blunt but also, in a way more
    honest. i get yelled at almost every day here. usually i cant hear what they
    say and dont care, sometimes it's funny, but most of the time it's some
    drunken imbecile. it's usually younger people probably raised by the tv. i
    never have any prob with the homeless and beggars and it's 95% suburban
    youth giving me trouble (my commute takes me through suburbs and inner
    city).
    -alan


    "curt" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:E%[email protected]
    > :( I always heard Washington was one of the best bicycle states as far as
    > friendly people go. That bums me out to hear about crap like that out you
    > way. It is expected in the North East US with how aggressive we are over
    > here. :(
    >
    > Curt
    >
    >
    > "dreaded" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > it was hot today. 95 degrees in the shade in seattle is a rare thing

    > indeed.
    > > the asphalt street is slick from heat and no shade at the stoplights.
    > > commuting through downtown with a full pack and overheating i

    concentrate
    > > and take my lane -downtown there are no vehicles faster than mine- and

    > some
    > > motorist races by about two feet to my left laying on the horn just as

    he
    > > passes. a fuse blew, maybe a small aneurism ocurred, the radiator in my

    > head
    > > blew it's cap. i reacted readying myself for rolling over a car as he

    > passed
    > > laughing. then with nothing to crash into and an adrenalin glut the

    finger
    > > goes up and obscenities roll. i followed up to the stop. two tough

    looking
    > > guys, windows down i yelled "what the f*** are you doing?". he said "i

    was
    > > just messing with you man". i said something about if he wanted to see

    me
    > > get killed that's a good way to do it. i think it was the heat, but

    really
    > i
    > > could have gone down just in the reaction to being startled like that.

    > damn
    > > it's hard to just be defensive sometimes! why do people always pull crap
    > > like that in groups?
    > > -a
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
  7. Steve-o

    Steve-o Guest

    On Sun, 25 Jul 2004 03:43:32 GMT, "curt" <[email protected]> wrote:

    :mad: I always heard Washington was one of the best bicycle states as far as
    >friendly people go. That bums me out to hear about crap like that out you
    >way. It is expected in the North East US with how aggressive we are over
    >here. :(


    The friendliness factor has dropped considerably as more and more
    people have moved here from elsewhere. People have brought with them
    aggressive, competitive attitudes whence they came; and as the
    population density increases the stress rises for everybody,
    especially in traffic. It doesn't help that Seattle is not known for
    its progressive transportation planning, so there is usually something
    for everybody -- bicyclists, SOVs, bus riders, etc -- to be irritated
    about.

    Maybe in this regard Seattle is no different than other US cities its
    size, but it certainly has declined over the years.

    My US$.02.
    Steve
     
  8. curt

    curt Guest

    "the black rose" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > curt wrote:
    > > :( I always heard Washington was one of the best bicycle states as far

    as
    > > friendly people go. That bums me out to hear about crap like that out

    you
    > > way. It is expected in the North East US with how aggressive we are

    over
    > > here. :(

    >
    > The part of NY I live in isn't bad. My husband and I rode for over an
    > hour yesterday on a road that goes straight through the middle of town;
    > we only got honked at once (by someone in a pickup truck, gee, what a
    > surprise), and the guy who yelled at me was asking if I knew where the
    > Home Depot was. But I have to admit, it's a marked county bike route,
    > and cyclists are a common sight.
    >
    > -km


    Pick-up truck... that does figure. I wonder where the best area in the US
    to ride a bicycle is? It is probably hard to find many places that are
    really nice anymore. I know the inland areas of Florida are terrible. That
    is down right dangerous. Here in Pittsburgh, it is okay I guess. I get
    mostly people passing really close and cutting me off. Not too many horns.
    I have a feeling I will have a big encounter at some point. I don't take
    much crap from people and in the heat of a moment it can be a bad situation.
    I have been thinking of carrying a gun just in case. I live in the city and
    have to travel through some pretty bad areas to get anywhere.

    Curt
     
  9. curt

    curt Guest

    "dreaded" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > i like it here but seattle is full of posers. there's this kind of
    > superficial friendliness/passive agressiveness that dominates (i think
    > that's part of why nobody ever messes with me unless they're in a group!).

    i
    > think that on the east coast people are more blunt but also, in a way more
    > honest. i get yelled at almost every day here. usually i cant hear what

    they
    > say and dont care, sometimes it's funny, but most of the time it's some
    > drunken imbecile. it's usually younger people probably raised by the tv. i
    > never have any prob with the homeless and beggars and it's 95% suburban
    > youth giving me trouble (my commute takes me through suburbs and inner
    > city).
    > -alan
    >


    Interesting. Posers. I guess the country is just getting too small really
    and pretty soon it will be all the same, or so it seeems. I hope not, but
    it is looking that way. Too many people I guess.

    Curt


    >
    > "curt" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:E%[email protected]
    > > :( I always heard Washington was one of the best bicycle states as far

    as
    > > friendly people go. That bums me out to hear about crap like that out

    you
    > > way. It is expected in the North East US with how aggressive we are

    over
    > > here. :(
    > >
    > > Curt
    > >
    > >
    > > "dreaded" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > > > it was hot today. 95 degrees in the shade in seattle is a rare thing

    > > indeed.
    > > > the asphalt street is slick from heat and no shade at the stoplights.
    > > > commuting through downtown with a full pack and overheating i

    > concentrate
    > > > and take my lane -downtown there are no vehicles faster than mine- and

    > > some
    > > > motorist races by about two feet to my left laying on the horn just as

    > he
    > > > passes. a fuse blew, maybe a small aneurism ocurred, the radiator in

    my
    > > head
    > > > blew it's cap. i reacted readying myself for rolling over a car as he

    > > passed
    > > > laughing. then with nothing to crash into and an adrenalin glut the

    > finger
    > > > goes up and obscenities roll. i followed up to the stop. two tough

    > looking
    > > > guys, windows down i yelled "what the f*** are you doing?". he said "i

    > was
    > > > just messing with you man". i said something about if he wanted to see

    > me
    > > > get killed that's a good way to do it. i think it was the heat, but

    > really
    > > i
    > > > could have gone down just in the reaction to being startled like that.

    > > damn
    > > > it's hard to just be defensive sometimes! why do people always pull

    crap
    > > > like that in groups?
    > > > -a
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
  10. curt

    curt Guest

    "Steve-o" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]@theriver.com...
    > On Sun, 25 Jul 2004 03:43:32 GMT, "curt" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > :mad: I always heard Washington was one of the best bicycle states as far

    as
    > >friendly people go. That bums me out to hear about crap like that out

    you
    > >way. It is expected in the North East US with how aggressive we are over
    > >here. :(

    >
    > The friendliness factor has dropped considerably as more and more
    > people have moved here from elsewhere. People have brought with them
    > aggressive, competitive attitudes whence they came; and as the
    > population density increases the stress rises for everybody,
    > especially in traffic. It doesn't help that Seattle is not known for
    > its progressive transportation planning, so there is usually something
    > for everybody -- bicyclists, SOVs, bus riders, etc -- to be irritated
    > about.
    >
    > Maybe in this regard Seattle is no different than other US cities its
    > size, but it certainly has declined over the years.
    >
    > My US$.02.
    > Steve


    That is sad to hear. I was reading a book called "Miles From Nowhere" and
    it was written in the 70's. They were saying Washington State was
    outstanding for bicycling and people were so nice and patient. I guess it
    is the sign of the times.

    Curt
     
  11. dreaded

    dreaded Guest

    "curt" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Steve-o" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]@theriver.com...
    > > On Sun, 25 Jul 2004 03:43:32 GMT, "curt" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > :mad: I always heard Washington was one of the best bicycle states as far

    > as
    > > >friendly people go. That bums me out to hear about crap like that out

    > you
    > > >way. It is expected in the North East US with how aggressive we are

    over
    > > >here. :(

    > >
    > > The friendliness factor has dropped considerably as more and more
    > > people have moved here from elsewhere. People have brought with them
    > > aggressive, competitive attitudes whence they came; and as the
    > > population density increases the stress rises for everybody,
    > > especially in traffic. It doesn't help that Seattle is not known for
    > > its progressive transportation planning, so there is usually something
    > > for everybody -- bicyclists, SOVs, bus riders, etc -- to be irritated
    > > about.
    > >
    > > Maybe in this regard Seattle is no different than other US cities its
    > > size, but it certainly has declined over the years.
    > >
    > > My US$.02.
    > > Steve

    >
    > That is sad to hear. I was reading a book called "Miles From Nowhere" and
    > it was written in the 70's. They were saying Washington State was
    > outstanding for bicycling and people were so nice and patient. I guess it
    > is the sign of the times.
    >
    > Curt
    >
    >

    Ya, y'know when i moved here in '92 i was cycling a lot more. it was
    definitely better then, although i do remember getting a "bicycle route map"
    from a lbs that had colored streets that were designated routes. i found
    most of these routes were just regular narrow two-way seattle streets with
    just enough room for a single vehicle (bike or car) and bicycle signs every
    mile or so which has no effect on the drivers. all in all though it's a
    great place to ride just because of the cool weather and the mountains,
    hills and islands.
     
  12. Steve-o

    Steve-o Guest

    I wrote:

    >> > The friendliness factor has dropped considerably as more and more
    >> > people have moved here from elsewhere.
    >> > [A]nd as the
    >> > population density increases the stress rises for everybody,


    then dreaded wrote:

    >Ya, y'know when i moved here in '92....


    ACK! You're part of the problem, dude.

    (90% kidding)

    Curious:
    Where did you move from?
    What brought you here? Music? Software?
     
  13. Steve-o

    Steve-o Guest

    On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 03:07:45 GMT, "curt" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >That is sad to hear. I was reading a book called "Miles From Nowhere" and
    >it was written in the 70's. They were saying Washington State was
    >outstanding for bicycling and people were so nice and patient.


    OMG, Seattle *was* Miles From Nowhere in the '70s. A lot has changed
    in 30 years.
     
  14. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Steve-o" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]@theriver.com...
    > On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 03:07:45 GMT, "curt" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >That is sad to hear. I was reading a book called "Miles From Nowhere" and
    > >it was written in the 70's. They were saying Washington State was
    > >outstanding for bicycling and people were so nice and patient.

    >
    > OMG, Seattle *was* Miles From Nowhere in the '70s. A lot has changed
    > in 30 years.


    Barbara Savage, the author of "Miles from Nowhere", was killed near Santa
    Barbara CA, in a bike/truck collision shortly before the book was printed.

    Having ridden a bunch 30 years ago myself, I can tell you it was no picnic
    then, either.
     
  15. BanditManDan

    BanditManDan New Member

    Joined:
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    Hmm, I live in central Florida and I've never considered carrying a gun. Actually central Florida isn't that bad, but I do get the occational honk/yelling too. From the sounds of things its the same everywhere.

    Dan.
     
  16. "Steve-o" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]@theriver.com...
    >
    > someone wrote:
    >
    > >> > The friendliness factor has dropped considerably as more and more
    > >> > people have moved here from elsewhere.
    > >> > [A]nd as the
    > >> > population density increases the stress rises for everybody,

    >
    > then dreaded wrote:
    >
    > >Ya, y'know when i moved here in '92....


    My great grandfather moved here just before you, in '90; great-grandma came
    out a bit later, in '94.

    > ACK! You're part of the problem, dude.


    That's probably what the Indians said when my grandfather arrived.

    > What brought you here? Music? Software?


    I can tell you, it wasn't music or software that brought my great
    grandparents out here.


    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    please substitute yahoo for mousepotato to reply
    Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
    Personal page: http://www.geocities.com/cpetersky/
    See the books I've set free at: http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
  17. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "curt" <[email protected]> writes:

    >> The part of NY I live in isn't bad. My husband and I rode for over an
    >> hour yesterday on a road that goes straight through the middle of town;
    >> we only got honked at once (by someone in a pickup truck, gee, what a
    >> surprise), and the guy who yelled at me was asking if I knew where the
    >> Home Depot was. But I have to admit, it's a marked county bike route,
    >> and cyclists are a common sight.
    >>
    >> -km

    >
    > Pick-up truck... that does figure.


    Lately I've been noticing a lot of attitude coming from
    drivers of fancy, customized/accessorized, glossy _black_
    pickup trucks. The trucks don't like they've done an inch of
    real work in their lives. Sometimes, but not always, they're
    slightly low-ridered. I've learnt to look out for them.
    I guess London has its infamous White Vans; Vancouver BC
    has its black pickup trucks.


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  18. Steve-o

    Steve-o Guest

    On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 23:13:43 GMT, "Claire Petersky"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >My great grandfather moved here just before you, in '90; great-grandma came
    >out a bit later, in '94.


    Not sure when my Greats moved here, but my grandmother was born here
    in '09. No word on what the cycling was like at that time.


    >> ACK! You're part of the problem, dude.

    >
    >That's probably what the Indians said when my grandfather arrived.


    Very likely, except perhaps the "ACK" and "dude" bits.
     
  19. Tom Keats wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "curt" <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >
    >>>The part of NY I live in isn't bad. My husband and I rode for over an
    >>>hour yesterday on a road that goes straight through the middle of town;
    >>>we only got honked at once (by someone in a pickup truck, gee, what a
    >>>surprise), and the guy who yelled at me was asking if I knew where the
    >>>Home Depot was. But I have to admit, it's a marked county bike route,
    >>>and cyclists are a common sight.
    >>>
    >>>-km

    >>
    >>Pick-up truck... that does figure.

    >
    >
    > Lately I've been noticing a lot of attitude coming from
    > drivers of fancy, customized/accessorized, glossy _black_
    > pickup trucks. The trucks don't like they've done an inch of
    > real work in their lives. Sometimes, but not always, they're
    > slightly low-ridered. I've learnt to look out for them.
    > I guess London has its infamous White Vans; Vancouver BC
    > has its black pickup trucks.


    I don't remember what color it was, but I do remember that it was glossy
    and clean and didn't look like it had ever touched anything but paved
    city streets.

    Back on the farm, we had a pickup truck. It was a dark red half ton
    4x4. It was always dusty, had some dents (one was courtesy of an
    annoyed mare), and generally looked pretty well used and abused. I was
    proud of that truck -- I felt like I was driving a rolling hill down the
    street. Not jacked, just higher than your average passenger car.

    We have a minivan now that we live in town. *sigh* (Long wheel-base
    minivan, so my long-leggity beasties, er, I mean sons, don't have to sit
    with their knees under their chins.)

    -km

    --
    the black rose
    proud to be owned by a yorkie
    http://community.webshots.com/user/blackrosequilts
     
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