Adult Learner

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by SLTE, Sep 4, 2015.

  1. SLTE

    SLTE New Member

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    I was taught how to ride a bike when I was four or five, so I'm not the issue here. My wife, by contrast, never learned how to ride properly. She doesn't know how to balance very well, and she's fearful of getting her feet up off the ground. I don't blame her - it hurts a lot more to take a spill as an adult than it does as a kid.

    She does, however, want to learn, and since we don't have a car I think it would be a good idea. Does anyone have any tips for teaching an adult how to ride that wouldn't apply when you're teaching a child? What kind of bike would be ideal for a newcomer adult?
     
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  2. Corzhens

    Corzhens Well-Known Member

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    Now I am confused in remembering how I learned how to ride a bike. But anyway, I had taught almost all the children in the family when we usually go to park. The first rule is to familiarize the newbie on the saddle. Make him comfortable and if needed, let him stay on the saddle while doing something else like reading a book. When the fear is gone, it is time to move on. Look ahead and never look at the front wheel. Concentrate on your balance. That's the way I taught the kids and it only took them 5 minutes to be on their own.
     
  3. sunshiney

    sunshiney Member

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    I'm not sure there's anything you'd typically teach a kid that wouldn't also apply for an adult, it's all the same principle, just scaled up a bit :)

    Try to find a park to practice in. Most of them have footpaths and it can be way less intimidating to practice on those than on the road, particularly since they're usually bordered in grass. You could also just ride straight on the grass. So much of learning how to ride is overcoming that fear of falling and if you're somewhere with a soft landing it makes it that much easier. Start by coasting downhill to practice braking and steering and move on to pedaling once she's comfortable with her balance.

    A mountain bike or something with fatter tires would be easier to start with than a road bike. You could also go for a hybrid, which would be a bit more comfortable to commute on.
     
  4. Keyan

    Keyan Member

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    I think she needs to let go of her fear. That fear will always make her want to lose her balance and fall. I do not see any help that would be different because whatever technique you will use is going to be beneficial to both ages. It is all in the mind and the body will follow.
     
  5. DarkStarling

    DarkStarling New Member

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    I do believe the fear is the problem, and it would be the same case with the child. The way anyone begins cycling is just being on a bike and trying, and I don't believe there are any big differences between a child an adult learner.
     
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