Advice desired regarding products for a deaf rider



Trighap

New Member
Oct 16, 2013
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Greetings;

While I am an overweight rider looking into cycling as both exercise and transportation, there's plenty of advice already listed to read on that. Another problem for me, that I *am* hoping for advice on, is that I am deaf and suffer from anxiety. As such, I am actually quite concerned about riding on streets. Are there products that a deaf person should especially use, or does general safety equipment suffice? Thank you in advance for any serious replies.

Trighap
 

alienator

Well-Known Member
Jun 10, 2004
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Trighap said:
Greetings; While I am an overweight rider looking into cycling as both exercise and transportation, there's plenty of advice already listed to read on that.  Another problem for me, that I *am* hoping for advice on, is that I am deaf and suffer from anxiety.  As such, I am actually quite concerned about riding on streets.  Are there products that a deaf person should especially use, or does general safety equipment suffice?  Thank you in advance for any serious replies. Trighap
You should consider helmet mounted, glasses mounted, or a handlebar mounted mirror. Frankly I think the helmet mounted or glasses mounted options are better as they provide a good rearward view that doesn't require looking away from the road much at all.
 

Volnix

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2011
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I would avoid riding in the traffic (I assume that this is what you worry about).

As far for the anxiety I think that cycling would help with that... I am a bit "neurotic"
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my self and cycling has helped me alot sleeping better in the night and cope with stressful enviroments.

You should probably in any case also get advice from a qualified proffesional, like a psychologist.

Good luck!
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Subliminal-SS

New Member
Sep 4, 2013
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While Im not Deaf I do prefer to ride with Headphones in and hesitated at first but the way I see it. If a car is going to hit you regardless if you hear it or not its going to happen. Im talking about straight and level riding here if anyone swerves into roads etc then that is their own fault.

Anyway I Started life out with a mirror it was a mirror that pushed into the drop bars on my Roadie and it was great for my first few months I really appreciated being able to glance back as I wasnt the best balanced.

You should make sure you can look back without swerving first and foremost Fit a mirror and then practice balance without cars on the road. Look back in the mirror check its all clear then glance around. Repeat until its nice and easy.

I found the audio in my area hugely deceiveing at first. Cars would be a couple of roads away I would think they were behind me some would come from the bottom of my hill and id think they are behind me situational awareness from sound is all good but not that big a deal.

Like I mentioned be sensible, be safe, always expect a car to be behind you until you confirm there is not, even if you could hear a car coming from behind if hes in your bit of road its gonna happen. They will be electric soon anyway so it wont matter before long ;)

The Anxiety is another ball game depends on how bad it is really but get comfortable on quiet back roads and get plenty of visual aids like mirrors and just do you'r own thing, just let the motorist drive their car and you ride you'r bike. I see so many of my friends waving cars past because their twitchy and slow down etc. For god sakes dont do that youll end up causing a major accident.
 

dabac

Well-Known Member
Sep 16, 2003
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IMO, cars aren't much of a problem. Sure, cars are heavy and pack a heavy punch IF they should hit you. But OTOH cars are big, easy to spot and generally very predictable in their behaviour. Cars that misbehave can be identified by the plate number and be reported. Well, admittedly there's the occasional road rage yahoo, but those are just random flukes and may almost as easily take offense at your driving as at your riding. Don't let them rule your world. Other cyclists, sensation-deprived pedestrians strolling around in hoodies, glasses and Mp3-players, dogs on yo-yo leashes, those are the things I worry about in traffic. Very unpredictable and a lot harder to spot. OTOH, these don't pack much of a punch so the risk of serious injury is really small. On top of that, YOU have a great deal of influence over how big the risk is gonna get through controlling how fast you approach, try to pass these animated ride features. But mirrors, hi-viz clothing, and practise your skill at looking over your shoulder w/o swerving sounds like a good start.
 

Trighap

New Member
Oct 16, 2013
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Thank you to all who replied. The mirror (and glass mounted or helmet mounted does seem the way to go) and the high vis clothing are good ideas. Thanks.
 

margen

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Nov 7, 2013
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its a very nice post i like it thanks for the nice sharing good job keep it up...
 

urge2kill

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Aug 13, 2013
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There isn't much I can hear anyway. People don't use their horns a lot, but they try to yell things at me. I can't even make out what they're yelling.

But since people may try to honk at you, you should probably let them know you're deaf.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Subliminal-SS .
I found the audio in my area hugely deceiveing at first. Cars would be a couple of roads away I would think they were behind me some would come from the bottom of my hill and id think they are behind me situational awareness from sound is all good but not that big a deal.

I don't think I can hear cars coming at all, but maybe that varies with the car-type and whether I'm riding with or against the wind. I once turned out in front of a car because I wasn't able to hear it behind me. They punched their horn.