Advice from Atkins dieters, please

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Pat, Jun 30, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Pat

    Pat Guest

    x-no-archive:yes

    I am signing up for the "Peach Pedal" ride in Weatherford, Texas on July 12 and plan to ride 40
    miles. I have been on the Atkins diet for 3 weeks and have lost 11 pounds so far. My questions are:
    do I eat differently the day before the ride? Do I eat carbohydrates during the ride or try to stick
    with cheese or meat? What about after the ride? Do I drink some Gatorade or just water?

    I am wondering if it would work to go off of the Atkins diet for July 12 and then go back on it the
    next day. So far, the most I have ridden has been nearly 2 hours in 94 degree heat. No bonking
    problems, but I did have a few things to say about the wind! The slightly nauseated stomach feeling
    has gone away, and I feel pretty good, overall.

    I am losing 2 pounds a week without any hunger problems at all. I have developed an appreciation of
    a good salad, well constructed and mixed, and have lost my sugar cravings.

    Pat in Texas
     
    Tags:


  2. D.Putnam

    D.Putnam Guest

    I can't imagine riding a lot with a low-carb diet...how do you do it? Conventional wisdom dictates:
    load with carbs prior to a big ride and eat lots of them during.
     
  3. Bob M

    Bob M Guest

    On Mon, 30 Jun 2003 11:54:57 -0500, Pat <[email protected]> wrote:

    > x-no-archive:yes
    >
    >
    > I am signing up for the "Peach Pedal" ride in Weatherford, Texas on July 12 and plan to ride 40
    > miles. I have been on the Atkins diet for 3 weeks and have lost 11 pounds so far. My questions
    > are: do I eat differently the day before the ride? Do I eat carbohydrates during the ride or try
    > to stick with cheese or meat? What about after the ride? Do I drink some Gatorade or just water?
    >
    > I am wondering if it would work to go off of the Atkins diet for July 12 and then go back on it
    > the next day. So far, the most I have ridden has been nearly 2 hours in 94 degree heat. No bonking
    > problems, but I did have a few things to say about the wind! The slightly nauseated stomach
    > feeling has gone away, and I feel pretty good, overall.
    >
    > I am losing 2 pounds a week without any hunger problems at all. I have developed an appreciation
    > of a good salad, well constructed and mixed, and have lost my sugar cravings.
    >
    > Pat in Texas
    >
    >

    What I've been doing is nothing for rides below about 1.5 hours (other than taking in a small amount
    of dextrose before my ride -- I ride in the morning), and for rides greater than about 1.5 hours,
    also taking in a recouperation drink with dextrose. I also plan to take extra dextrose- laden drinks
    for rides longer than 3 hours, so one drink per 1.5 hours. You can buy "carb boom" and similar
    products, but they are basically sugar
    + electrolytes. You can create the same by buying dextrose (or maltodextrin) from a beer brewing
    store and adding your own electrolytes. However, the gells and powders are already premixed, so
    there's no worry about too much or too little in terms of electrolytes. Also, you may want to carb
    load a day or two before the ride. Search for "targeted ketogenic diet" (TKD) or "cyclic ketogenic
    diet" (CKD) for more information. I'm going to ride a MS fun ride of 115 miles over two days, and
    I'll stay low carb until about two days before the ride, when I'll increase the level of carbs
    (CKD). I'll keep the carb intake relatively high through the two days of riding, then immediately
    get back to low carb afterwards.

    For me, it's a matter of experimentation, but I have almost three months to experiment
    before my ride.

    --
    Bob M in CT Remove 'x.' to reply
     
  4. Strongbad

    Strongbad Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I can't imagine riding a lot with a low-carb diet...how do you do it? Conventional wisdom
    > dictates: load with carbs prior to a big ride and eat lots of them during.

    The reason you have to keep eating carbs during riding is becase glycogen (stored fuel from
    carbs) is not a long term energy source. From a evolutionary point of view, glycogen (read:
    carbs) is your body "turbocharger" for that extra burst of energy when you are trying to run
    from a sabretooth tiger :) *fat* is in fact, your body's best "long term" fuel. The thing
    is, once you free your body from its dependency on glucose as a *primary* fuel source, you
    can function quite well (if not better) on a lipid based metabolism. I have no problem doing
    60+ mile rides on a low carb diet, since my body is adapted to burning fat efficiently as a
    fuel source. There are several books on the subject of endurance exercise and low carbing
    written by people who regularly run marathons(!) on strict low carb diets, and have
    researched the subject extensively. From what I have been reading, it is becoming
    increasingly popular for endurance athletes to train on low carb, to adapt their bodies to
    lipid based metabolism, and then "carb up" right before the race to replenish glycogen
    stores, without switching back over to a fully "carb based" energy source. the theory is
    that this provides the best of both worlds: the fast burning glycogen needed for intense
    energy bursts, and the ability to mobilize lipids for slow burning endurance fuel. It
    definitely bears looking into. Personally I simply low carb for health reasons (to control
    cholesterol/BP), as well as the fact that it keeps me in shape :) but I have not noticed
    any adverse affects on my riding performance.

    for the original poster, if you feel you need to take food for the ride, I often take nuts
    (macadamia) or beef jerky which are both "jersey- pocket-able" on long rides, and just plain water
    (lots of it, usually a 70oz camelback) to drink. if you are really concerned with electrolyte
    imbalance due to excessive sweating or such, you can make your own sugar-free electrolyte solution
    to take along in a bottle.
     
  5. Bob M

    Bob M Guest

    On Mon, 30 Jun 2003 14:14:01 -0400, StrongBad <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >> I can't imagine riding a lot with a low-carb diet...how do you do it? Conventional wisdom
    >> dictates: load with carbs prior to a big ride and eat lots of them during.
    >
    > The reason you have to keep eating carbs during riding is becase glycogen (stored fuel from
    > carbs) is not a long term energy source. From a evolutionary point of view, glycogen (read:
    > carbs) is your body "turbocharger" for that extra burst of energy when you are trying to run
    > from a sabretooth tiger :) *fat* is in fact, your body's best "long term" fuel. The thing
    > is, once you free your body from its dependency on glucose as a *primary* fuel source, you
    > can function quite well (if not better) on a lipid based metabolism. I have no problem doing
    > 60+ mile rides on a low carb diet, since my body is adapted to burning fat efficiently as a
    > fuel source. There are several books on the subject of endurance exercise and low carbing
    > written by people who regularly run marathons(!) on strict low carb diets, and have
    > researched the subject extensively. From what I have been reading, it is becoming
    > increasingly popular for endurance athletes to train on low carb, to adapt their bodies to
    > lipid based metabolism, and then "carb up" right before the race to replenish glycogen
    > stores, without switching back over to a fully "carb based" energy source. the theory is
    > that this provides the best of both worlds: the fast burning glycogen needed for intense
    > energy bursts, and the ability to mobilize lipids for slow burning endurance fuel. It
    > definitely bears looking into. Personally I simply low carb for health reasons (to control
    > cholesterol/BP), as well as the fact that it keeps me in shape :) but I have not noticed
    > any adverse affects on my riding performance.
    >
    > for the original poster, if you feel you need to take food for the ride, I often take nuts
    > (macadamia) or beef jerky which are both "jersey- pocket-able" on long rides, and just plain water
    > (lots of it, usually a 70oz camelback) to drink. if you are really concerned with electrolyte
    > imbalance due to excessive sweating or such, you can make your own sugar- free electrolyte
    > solution to take along in a bottle.

    I also have no problem doing long bike rides (both mountain and road) on a low carb diet. However, a
    small amount of carbs pre-ride, during, and post-ride seem to help me a bit and enhance
    recuperation. This may be because I ride in the morning. Plus, the amount of carbs I'm taking in is
    nowhere even close to what is recommended by bike magazines and high carb people. I take in 1/4 cup
    of dextrose (i.e., glucose) beforehand and 1/4C for my recuperation. I don't know how much this is
    in grams, but it's pretty small.

    --
    Bob M in CT Remove 'x.' to reply
     
  6. Strongbad

    Strongbad Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    > I also have no problem doing long bike rides (both mountain and road) on a low carb diet. However,
    > a small amount of carbs pre-ride, during, and post-ride seem to help me a bit and enhance
    > recuperation. This may be because I ride in the morning. Plus, the amount of carbs I'm taking in
    > is nowhere even close to what is recommended by bike magazines and high carb people. I take in 1/4
    > cup of dextrose (i.e., glucose) beforehand and 1/4C for my recuperation. I don't know how much
    > this is in grams, but it's pretty small.

    That's pretty common, IOW, you are doing a TKD (as mentioned in your other post) When I am training
    very hard, (interval or hill training
    4x/week, and weights 3x/week) I often do a TKD or CKD, but otherwise I find I do better without the
    extra carbs. I suspect the fact that I am (or was) highly insulin reistant has something to do
    with it. It varies a lot based on individual metabolic factors, but yes, in general TKD and CKD
    can be very effective for training.
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I can't imagine riding a lot with a low-carb diet...how do you do it? Conventional wisdom
    > dictates: load with carbs prior to a big ride and eat lots of them during.
    >
    >
    >

    In this case, "conventional wisdom" is a bit of an oxymoron :)
    --
    _________________________
    Chris Phillipo - Cape Breton, Nova Scotia http://www.ramsays-online.com
     
  8. Psycholist

    Psycholist Guest

    If you've been riding two hours with no bonking problems and you're only planning to ride 40 miles,
    won't 2 hours darned near cover it? How slow do you plan to go? Or is this mtb?

    Bob

    "Pat" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > x-no-archive:yes
    >
    >
    > I am signing up for the "Peach Pedal" ride in Weatherford, Texas on July
    12
    > and plan to ride 40 miles. I have been on the Atkins diet for 3 weeks and have lost 11 pounds so
    > far. My questions are: do I eat differently the
    day
    > before the ride? Do I eat carbohydrates during the ride or try to stick with cheese or meat? What
    > about after the ride? Do I drink some Gatorade
    or
    > just water?
    >
    > I am wondering if it would work to go off of the Atkins diet for July 12
    and
    > then go back on it the next day. So far, the most I have ridden has been nearly 2 hours in 94
    > degree heat. No bonking problems, but I did have a
    few
    > things to say about the wind! The slightly nauseated stomach feeling has gone away, and I feel
    > pretty good, overall.
    >
    > I am losing 2 pounds a week without any hunger problems at all. I have developed an appreciation
    > of a good salad, well constructed and mixed, and have lost my sugar cravings.
    >
    > Pat in Texas
    >
    >
     
  9. Top Sirloin

    Top Sirloin Guest

    On Mon, 30 Jun 2003 11:54:57 -0500, "Pat" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I am wondering if it would work to go off of the Atkins diet for July 12 and then go back on it the
    >next day. So far, the most I have ridden has been nearly 2 hours in 94 degree heat. No bonking
    >problems, but I did have a few things to say about the wind! The slightly nauseated stomach feeling
    >has gone away, and I feel pretty good, overall.

    You should be fine. I'm sure you've noticed that any effort harder than "easy" sucks a lot and is
    hard to maintain.

    --

    Scott Johnson "be a man ,stop looking for handouts , eat ,lift and shut your mouth" -John Carlo
     
  10. Top Sirloin

    Top Sirloin Guest

    On Mon, 30 Jun 2003 21:47:07 -0400, "psycholist" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >If you've been riding two hours with no bonking problems and you're only planning to ride 40 miles,
    >won't 2 hours darned near cover it? How slow do you plan to go? Or is this mtb?

    It's impossible for him to bonk if he's in ketosis. In effect he already has.

    --

    Scott Johnson "be a man ,stop looking for handouts , eat ,lift and shut your mouth" -John Carlo
     
  11. D.Putnam

    D.Putnam Guest

    Fascinating stuff...thanks for the info.

    "StrongBad" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > > I also have no problem doing long bike rides (both mountain and road) on
    a
    > > low carb diet. However, a small amount of carbs pre-ride, during, and post-ride seem to help me
    > > a bit and enhance recuperation. This may be because I ride in the morning. Plus, the amount of
    > > carbs I'm taking in
    is
    > > nowhere even close to what is recommended by bike magazines and high
    carb
    > > people. I take in 1/4 cup of dextrose (i.e., glucose) beforehand and
    1/4C
    > > for my recuperation. I don't know how much this is in grams, but it's pretty small.
    >
    > That's pretty common, IOW, you are doing a TKD (as mentioned in your other post) When I am
    > training very hard, (interval or hill training
    > 4x/week, and weights 3x/week) I often do a TKD or CKD, but otherwise I find I do better without
    > the extra carbs. I suspect the fact that I am (or was) highly insulin reistant has something to
    > do with it. It varies a lot based on individual metabolic factors, but yes, in general TKD and
    > CKD can be very effective for training.
     
  12. W K

    W K Guest

    "Chris Phillipo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > I can't imagine riding a lot with a low-carb diet...how do you do it? Conventional wisdom
    > > dictates: load with carbs prior to a big ride and
    eat
    > > lots of them during.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    >
    > In this case, "conventional wisdom" is a bit of an oxymoron :)

    So, sports science is wrong?
     
  13. W K

    W K Guest

    "StrongBad" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > The reason you have to keep eating carbs during riding is becase glycogen (stored fuel from carbs)
    > is not a long term energy source.

    It'll last an hour or two without any special preparation.

    > From a evolutionary point of view, glycogen (read: carbs) is your body "turbocharger" for that
    > extra burst of energy when you are trying to run from a sabretooth tiger :) *fat* is in fact,
    > your body's best "long term" fuel.

    Using fat requires a lot more oxygen. No matter how well adapted you are, your heart rate will have
    to be pretty low to be using mainly fat.
     
  14. D.Putnam

    D.Putnam Guest

    Yes, a "diet Guru" trumps science everytime....j/k!

    > > In this case, "conventional wisdom" is a bit of an oxymoron :)
    >
    > So, sports science is wrong?
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...