Advice needed on buying a bike

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Dough Man, Apr 20, 2003.

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  1. Dough Man

    Dough Man Guest

    I currently have a cheap, busted up Huffy that I ride around my neighborhood. I want to get a little
    more serious about biking, but I'm not sure if I want to go off-road or wanting to stay on road.
    What would be a descent bike for both? I'd like to stay under $500 and then see if I get into it
    more. I'm imagining that there might be a lot of these types of bikes for sale used, from people
    like me who bought them and are now wanting to upgrade. Is this true and is it worth getting a
    second hand bike?

    In short, my questions are what is a good bike for both on and off-road, and is it generally worth
    buying a used one?

    Thanks, Doug H.
     
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  2. Matt Gaffney

    Matt Gaffney Guest

    If you're not sure if you want a mountain bike or a road bike, stick with a mountain bike. You can
    always ride a mountain bike on the road, but you can't do the opposite! It sounds like any newer
    bike would be a good upgrade for you, so I'd recommend a used bike down around the $100-$200 range.
    Once you see if you're going to stick with it, you'll know a little more about what features would
    be important to you. If you don't stick with it, you can probably sell the bike close to what you
    paid for it.

    Dough Man <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I currently have a cheap, busted up Huffy that I ride around my neighborhood. I want to get a
    > little more serious about biking, but I'm not sure if I want to go off-road or wanting to stay on
    > road. What would be a descent bike for both? I'd like to stay under $500 and then see if I get
    > into it more. I'm imagining that there might be a lot of these types of bikes for sale used, from
    > people like me who bought them and are now wanting to upgrade. Is this true and is it worth
    > getting a second hand bike?
    >
    > In short, my questions are what is a good bike for both on and off-road, and is it generally worth
    > buying a used one?
    >
    > Thanks, Doug H.
     
  3. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    >In short, my questions are what is a good bike for both on and off-road, and is it generally worth
    >buying a used one?
    >
    >Thanks, Doug H.

    In my experience, a mountain can do a decent job both on and off road, a road bike is best use
    on the road.

    Buying a bike used can be a good way to save money if you know how to evaluate a bicycle and if you
    are reasonably handy with tools. It is also a good way to get taken if you are not aware of what
    could be wrong.

    Over the years I have bought many used bikes and gone over them and put them on the road. I have
    written a few pages discussing some of the things I have learned about evaluating and purchasing
    used bicycles, I can Email them to you if you are interested.

    jon isaacs
     
  4. Dough Man

    Dough Man Guest

    That would be great. I am definitley interested in reading what you have learned. My e-mail is
    [email protected]

    Thanks!

    Jon Isaacs <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > >In short, my questions are what is a good bike for both on and off-road, and is it generally
    > >worth buying a used one?
    > >
    > >Thanks, Doug H.
    >
    > In my experience, a mountain can do a decent job both on and off road, a
    road
    > bike is best use on the road.
    >
    > Buying a bike used can be a good way to save money if you know how to
    evaluate
    > a bicycle and if you are reasonably handy with tools. It is also a good
    way to
    > get taken if you are not aware of what could be wrong.
    >
    > Over the years I have bought many used bikes and gone over them and put
    them on
    > the road. I have written a few pages discussing some of the things I have learned about evaluating
    > and purchasing used bicycles, I can Email them to
    you
    > if you are interested.
    >
    > jon isaacs
     
  5. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Dough Man wrote:

    > That would be great. I am definitley interested in reading what you have learned. My e-mail is
    > [email protected]
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Jon Isaacs <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > >In short, my questions are what is a good bike for both on and off-road, and is it generally
    > > >worth buying a used one?
    > > >
    > > >Thanks, Doug H.
    > >
    > > In my experience, a mountain can do a decent job both on and off road, a
    > road
    > > bike is best use on the road.
    > >
    > > Buying a bike used can be a good way to save money if you know how to
    > evaluate
    > > a bicycle and if you are reasonably handy with tools. It is also a good
    > way to
    > > get taken if you are not aware of what could be wrong.
    > >
    > > Over the years I have bought many used bikes and gone over them and put
    > them on
    > > the road. I have written a few pages discussing some of the things I have learned about
    > > evaluating and purchasing used bicycles, I can Email them to
    > you
    > > if you are interested.
    > >
    > > jon isaacs
    > >
    > >
    > >

    Hey Jon can you send it to me too? I'm <frugally> shopping for a used road/touring bike. Best
    regards, Bernie
     
  6. Dough Man

    Dough Man Guest

    If I get a mountain bike and ride it with my friends that have road bikes, will I be able
    to keep up?

    "Matt Gaffney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > If you're not sure if you want a mountain bike or a road bike, stick with a mountain bike. You can
    > always ride a mountain bike on the road, but you can't do the opposite! It sounds like any newer
    > bike would be a good upgrade for you, so I'd recommend a used bike down around the $100-$200
    > range. Once you see if you're going to stick with it, you'll know a little more about what
    > features would be important to you. If you don't stick with it, you can probably sell the bike
    > close to what you paid for it.
    >
    > Dough Man <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I currently have a cheap, busted up Huffy that I ride around my neighborhood. I want to get a
    > > little more serious about biking, but I'm not sure if I want to go off-road or wanting to stay
    > > on road. What would be a descent bike for both? I'd like to stay under $500 and then see if I
    > > get into it more. I'm imagining that there might be a lot of these types of bikes for sale used,
    > > from people like me who bought them and are now wanting to upgrade. Is this true and is it worth
    > > getting a second hand bike?
    > >
    > > In short, my questions are what is a good bike for both on and off-road, and is it generally
    > > worth buying a used one?
    > >
    > > Thanks, Doug H.
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Dough
    Man) wrote:

    > If I get a mountain bike and ride it with my friends that have road bikes, will I be able to
    > keep up?

    Maybe. It depends on two things: how strong a rider you are, and whether you have put slicks on your
    bike. The latter is probably more important.

    With some decent slick tires inflated to a decent pressure on your MTB, you've made up most of the
    difference between road and mountain bikes on the road. The rest comes down to lesser but important
    aerodynamic and weight advantages for the road bike. At that point it's more a question of "I don't
    know; can _you_ keep up with your friends that have road bikes?"

    If you expect to switch between on and off-road a lot, consider buying a second set of rims, which
    will allow you to make the change in about a minute.

    > "Matt Gaffney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > If you're not sure if you want a mountain bike or a road bike, stick with a mountain bike.

    > > Dough Man <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...

    > > > In short, my questions are what is a good bike for both on and off-road, and is it generally
    > > > worth buying a used one?

    If I were in your shoes, I would look for a good-quality used mountain bike. If you're willing to
    settle for a rigid-fork MTB that's all passe now, you can get an excellent do-everything bike for
    $100, and I'm talking you'll probably end up with something nice like a Gary Fisher or other name
    brand bike.

    What such a bike will be able to teach you is which (if either) you prefer. At some point in the
    next few months you'll probably find that this rigid MTB is limiting your performance both on and
    off road, but by then you'll know what you want to do, and you will be ready to buy a nicer mountain
    bike and a nicer road bike, and you'll know what to look for, because you're going to keep hanging
    around here.

    You'll probably get one of each, because that's what every other bike nut does eventually, then they
    get the third bike, and that's when the madness really starts.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  8. Rich Clark

    Rich Clark Guest

    "Dough Man" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > If I get a mountain bike and ride it with my friends that have road bikes, will I be able to
    > keep up?

    Do you know that you would be able to keep up with them anyway? If the answer is yes, then put road
    tires on the MTB and unless your friends are competetive cyclists you'll probably be OK. You will
    have to work a little harder than they do, mostly due to your increased wind resistance from the
    more upright seating position. Bike weight is not as important as some people think, at least not
    for amateur/recreational riders.

    RichC
     
  9. Dough Man

    Dough Man Guest

    Do you think it would be easier to sell a beginner's mountain bike if I went with it and later
    decided to get a road bike over going with a beginner's road bike and later deciding to sell it
    to get a MB?

    "Rich Clark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Dough Man" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > If I get a mountain bike and ride it with my friends that have road bikes, will I be able to
    > > keep up?
    >
    > Do you know that you would be able to keep up with them anyway? If the answer is yes, then put
    > road tires on the MTB and unless your friends are competetive cyclists you'll probably be OK. You
    > will have to work a little harder than they do, mostly due to your increased wind resistance from
    > the more upright seating position. Bike weight is not as important as some people think, at least
    > not for amateur/recreational riders.
    >
    > RichC
    >
    >
     
  10. Dough Man

    Dough Man Guest

    You're right, I don't think I'd be able to keep up with them even with a bike of their caliber.

    "Rich Clark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Dough Man" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > If I get a mountain bike and ride it with my friends that have road bikes, will I be able to
    > > keep up?
    >
    > Do you know that you would be able to keep up with them anyway? If the answer is yes, then put
    > road tires on the MTB and unless your friends are competetive cyclists you'll probably be OK. You
    > will have to work a little harder than they do, mostly due to your increased wind resistance from
    > the more upright seating position. Bike weight is not as important as some people think, at least
    > not for amateur/recreational riders.
    >
    > RichC
    >
    >
     
  11. Rich Clark

    Rich Clark Guest

    "Dough Man" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Do you think it would be easier to sell a beginner's mountain bike if I
    went
    > with it and later decided to get a road bike over going with a beginner's road bike and later
    > deciding to sell it to get a MB?

    You can always sell a brand-name bike in good condition. Selling used mass-market bikes (Huffy,
    Pacific, et al) is less certain, because of the likelihood of their being broken in some unfixable
    way even when they're nearly new. Since there aren't any road bikes in this category any more, it's
    not an issue.

    But anyone who's riding a lot should have two bikes anyway. So that's another argument in favor of
    buying a quality bike from the get-go. It can be sold if you need to sell it, but it will last for
    years as a backup/beater bike.

    RichC
     
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