advice on carrying a suit on a bike



A

Adam Lea

Guest
I have a job interview on Monday and I was planning to do the journey by
train and folding bike. It involves an overnight stop which is about a 7
mile journey from the station and the venue is about 4 miles from where I
will be staying. As I will need a suit what is the best way to fold and
carry this on a bike without it getting creased? I was thinking of just
wearing it on the journey but I don't want to get it all sweaty prior to the
interview.

Adam
 
D

Duncan Smith

Guest

> I have a job interview on Monday and I was planning to do the journey by
> train and folding bike. It involves an overnight stop which is about a 7
> mile journey from the station and the venue is about 4 miles from where I
> will be staying. As I will need a suit what is the best way to fold and
> carry this on a bike without it getting creased? I was thinking of just
> wearing it on the journey but I don't want to get it all sweaty prior to the
> interview.
>


Or wet or muddy... Can you lay your hands on some waterproof panniers
in time? Works for taking my clothes into work, if you're careful
about how you fold everything it shouldn't be too bad. I think it's
your best option.

Regards,

Duncan
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
says...
> I have a job interview on Monday and I was planning to do the journey by
> train and folding bike. It involves an overnight stop which is about a 7
> mile journey from the station and the venue is about 4 miles from where I
> will be staying. As I will need a suit what is the best way to fold and
> carry this on a bike without it getting creased? I was thinking of just
> wearing it on the journey but I don't want to get it all sweaty prior to the
> interview.
>


What folding bike and how far to cycle? I occassionaly have to carry a
dinner jacket outfit on my Brompton. I find that if you put it in one
of those cheap plastic zip up suit bags you can drape it over the front
pannier and hook the protruding coathanger hook over the centre of the
handlebars. Fine for two or three miles. Alternatively by the time
you have faffed and changed you could have just cycled slower in the
suit and not worked up a sweat.

--
Tony

"The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has
taken place"
George Bernard Shaw
 
N

Nick Kew

Guest
On Fri, 09 Nov 2007 20:36:46 -0000
Duncan Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

> Or wet or muddy... Can you lay your hands on some waterproof panniers
> in time? Works for taking my clothes into work, if you're careful


Try with caution. One of my best white shirts is the one I had to buy
in a hurry, after cycling to an event with a shirt in my pannier, and
encountering serious rain on the way. Under normal circumstances, the
shirt in my pannier would've been right for the occasion. But ...

--
not me guv
 
A

Adam Lea

Guest
"Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
> says...
>> I have a job interview on Monday and I was planning to do the journey by
>> train and folding bike. It involves an overnight stop which is about a 7
>> mile journey from the station and the venue is about 4 miles from where I
>> will be staying. As I will need a suit what is the best way to fold and
>> carry this on a bike without it getting creased? I was thinking of just
>> wearing it on the journey but I don't want to get it all sweaty prior to
>> the
>> interview.
>>

>
> What folding bike and how far to cycle? I occassionaly have to carry a
> dinner jacket outfit on my Brompton. I find that if you put it in one
> of those cheap plastic zip up suit bags you can drape it over the front
> pannier and hook the protruding coathanger hook over the centre of the
> handlebars. Fine for two or three miles. Alternatively by the time
> you have faffed and changed you could have just cycled slower in the
> suit and not worked up a sweat.
>
> --


It is a Birdy (touring version). The distance to the B&B from the station is
about 7 miles and the distance from the B&B to the interview is about 4
miles. The distance from my house to the station is about 2 miles.
 
A

Adam Lea

Guest
"Duncan Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
>> I have a job interview on Monday and I was planning to do the journey by
>> train and folding bike. It involves an overnight stop which is about a 7
>> mile journey from the station and the venue is about 4 miles from where I
>> will be staying. As I will need a suit what is the best way to fold and
>> carry this on a bike without it getting creased? I was thinking of just
>> wearing it on the journey but I don't want to get it all sweaty prior to
>> the
>> interview.
>>

>
> Or wet or muddy... Can you lay your hands on some waterproof panniers
> in time? Works for taking my clothes into work, if you're careful
> about how you fold everything it shouldn't be too bad. I think it's
> your best option.
>
> Regards,
>
> Duncan
>


I do have some panniers which are showerproof. I also have one of those
plastic suit bags although trying to put the full suit in one pannier might
be a bit of a squeeze. I might need to put the jacket in one pannier and the
trousers in another.

Fortunately the weather forecast looks dry for Sunday and Monday.
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
says...

> I do have some panniers which are showerproof. I also have one of those
> plastic suit bags although trying to put the full suit in one pannier might
> be a bit of a squeeze. I might need to put the jacket in one pannier and the
> trousers in another.
>
> Fortunately the weather forecast looks dry for Sunday and Monday.
>


If you put it in a pannier the secret is to roll not fold.

--
Tony

"The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has
taken place"
George Bernard Shaw
 
V

vernon

Guest
"Adam Lea" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>I have a job interview on Monday and I was planning to do the journey by
>train and folding bike. It involves an overnight stop which is about a 7
>mile journey from the station and the venue is about 4 miles from where I
>will be staying. As I will need a suit what is the best way to fold and
>carry this on a bike without it getting creased? I was thinking of just
>wearing it on the journey but I don't want to get it all sweaty prior to
>the interview.
>
> Adam

<pragmatism>
If getting the job is very important to you can get a taxi then you have
less to fret about. You can then focus on the interview and you can
guarantee your freshness and appearance.
</pramatism>
 
A

Andreas Schulze-Bäing

Guest
Am Fri, 9 Nov 2007 20:10:13 -0000 schrieb Adam Lea:

> I have a job interview on Monday and I was planning to do the journey by
> train and folding bike. It involves an overnight stop which is about a 7
> mile journey from the station and the venue is about 4 miles from where I
> will be staying. As I will need a suit what is the best way to fold and
> carry this on a bike without it getting creased? I was thinking of just
> wearing it on the journey but I don't want to get it all sweaty prior to the
> interview.


As long as the way to the interview does not include climbing up a steep
hill, it is usually sufficient to cycle at a slower speed than normal to
avoid excessive sweating. You should also plan for some time to "cool down"
before the interview. To avoid getting wet on the way, maybe a cape might
be useful. My only concern would be the shiny shoes getting dirty on the
way. So a little cloth to clean them quickly might be useful.

Andreas
 
M

Marc Brett

Guest
On Sat, 10 Nov 2007 09:53:08 -0000, "vernon" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>"Adam Lea" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]
>>I have a job interview on Monday and I was planning to do the journey by
>>train and folding bike. It involves an overnight stop which is about a 7
>>mile journey from the station and the venue is about 4 miles from where I
>>will be staying. As I will need a suit what is the best way to fold and
>>carry this on a bike without it getting creased? I was thinking of just
>>wearing it on the journey but I don't want to get it all sweaty prior to
>>the interview.
>>
>> Adam

><pragmatism>
>If getting the job is very important to you can get a taxi then you have
>less to fret about. You can then focus on the interview and you can
>guarantee your freshness and appearance.
></pramatism>



For my first "real" job, I rode, all hot and sweaty, to the interview.
Cycling's eccentricity, pragmatism, and low ******** factor made a
positive impression and was definitely a reason for my winning the
position. None of this was by design -- I had no money to waste on cars
or taxis (or anything else!) and I cycled everywhere; why should a job
interview be any different?
 
V

vernon

Guest
"Marc Brett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Sat, 10 Nov 2007 09:53:08 -0000, "vernon" <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>
>>"Adam Lea" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>news:[email protected]
>>>I have a job interview on Monday and I was planning to do the journey by
>>>train and folding bike. It involves an overnight stop which is about a 7
>>>mile journey from the station and the venue is about 4 miles from where I
>>>will be staying. As I will need a suit what is the best way to fold and
>>>carry this on a bike without it getting creased? I was thinking of just
>>>wearing it on the journey but I don't want to get it all sweaty prior to
>>>the interview.
>>>
>>> Adam

>><pragmatism>
>>If getting the job is very important to you can get a taxi then you have
>>less to fret about. You can then focus on the interview and you can
>>guarantee your freshness and appearance.
>></pramatism>

>
>
> For my first "real" job, I rode, all hot and sweaty, to the interview.
> Cycling's eccentricity, pragmatism, and low ******** factor made a
> positive impression and was definitely a reason for my winning the
> position. None of this was by design -- I had no money to waste on cars
> or taxis (or anything else!) and I cycled everywhere; why should a job
> interview be any different?
>

Try convincing an interview panel that your dishevelled appearance should
not disadvantage you when applying for posts which demand high standards of
personal grooming....

Applying for a job is an activity that should cast the applicant in the most
positive light and personal grooming does count for a lot - first
impressions and all that. The candidate should also be relaxed and fully
prepared for the interview. Having to fret about one's state of dress and
transport logistics hardly puts one in a relaxed state of mind.

It all depends on what one want's from an interview - the job or the
interview experience.....

Personally I'd want the job and do everything to make sure that I was seen
in the most positive light.

If the interview requires a suit then it merits being displayed in a dry,
crease-free state filled by a relaxed interviewee who's quietly optimistic
about getting the job having done all the pre-interview research and
preparation.

I'd personally leave cycling in the hobbies and interest box on the
application form.

But each to their own taste.....
 
V

vernon

Guest
"Marc Brett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Sat, 10 Nov 2007 09:53:08 -0000, "vernon" <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>
>>"Adam Lea" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>news:[email protected]
>>>I have a job interview on Monday and I was planning to do the journey by
>>>train and folding bike. It involves an overnight stop which is about a 7
>>>mile journey from the station and the venue is about 4 miles from where I
>>>will be staying. As I will need a suit what is the best way to fold and
>>>carry this on a bike without it getting creased? I was thinking of just
>>>wearing it on the journey but I don't want to get it all sweaty prior to
>>>the interview.
>>>
>>> Adam

>><pragmatism>
>>If getting the job is very important to you can get a taxi then you have
>>less to fret about. You can then focus on the interview and you can
>>guarantee your freshness and appearance.
>></pramatism>

>
>
> For my first "real" job, I rode, all hot and sweaty, to the interview.
> Cycling's eccentricity, pragmatism, and low ******** factor made a
> positive impression and was definitely a reason for my winning the
> position. None of this was by design -- I had no money to waste on cars
> or taxis (or anything else!) and I cycled everywhere; why should a job
> interview be any different?
>

Try convincing an interview panel that your dishevelled appearance should
not disadvantage you when applying for posts which demand high standards of
personal grooming....

Applying for a job is an activity that should cast the applicant in the most
positive light and personal grooming does count for a lot - first
impressions and all that. The candidate should also be relaxed and fully
prepared for the interview. Having to fret about one's state of dress and
transport logistics hardly puts one in a relaxed state of mind.

It all depends on what one want's from an interview - the job or the
interview experience.....

Personally I'd want the job and do everything to make sure that I was seen
in the most positive light.

If the interview requires a suit then it merits being displayed in a dry,
crease-free state filled by a relaxed interviewee who's quietly optimistic
about getting the job having done all the pre-interview research and
preparation.

I'd personally leave cycling in the hobbies and interest box on the
application form.

But each to their own taste.....
 
J

Jeff

Guest
Adam Lea wrote:
> I have a job interview on Monday and I was planning to do the journey by
> train and folding bike. It involves an overnight stop which is about a 7
> mile journey from the station and the venue is about 4 miles from where I
> will be staying. As I will need a suit what is the best way to fold and
> carry this on a bike without it getting creased? I was thinking of just
> wearing it on the journey but I don't want to get it all sweaty prior to the
> interview.
>
> Adam
>
>


I've been cycling to work most of the past year (about 3KM). This time
of year, it's cool enough that I could wear my suit and not get sweaty,
but it's wet enough that I could still get splashed.

I gently fold my suit (and shirt) and put it in my backpack. Given the
short duration of my trip, creasing isn't an issue. I've seen another
rider who puts his suit on a hanger and inside a plastic bag (such as
one gets from a dry cleaner). He hangs it on the top of his back pack.
I'm not really tall enough to risk that.

On days that are, or promise to be, wet, I fold my clothes as normal but
put them into two plastic shopping bags. The inner bag sits on the
bottom of the back pack, the outer bag sits on the top. The overall
effect is that it becomes very difficult for water to get at my clothes.

I do like the pragmatic suggestion a prior poster made about taking a
taxi.

Best of luck on the interview.
 
J

Jeff

Guest
Adam Lea wrote:
> I have a job interview on Monday and I was planning to do the journey by
> train and folding bike. It involves an overnight stop which is about a 7
> mile journey from the station and the venue is about 4 miles from where I
> will be staying. As I will need a suit what is the best way to fold and
> carry this on a bike without it getting creased? I was thinking of just
> wearing it on the journey but I don't want to get it all sweaty prior to the
> interview.
>
> Adam
>
>


I've been cycling to work most of the past year (about 3KM). This time
of year, it's cool enough that I could wear my suit and not get sweaty,
but it's wet enough that I could still get splashed.

I gently fold my suit (and shirt) and put it in my backpack. Given the
short duration of my trip, creasing isn't an issue. I've seen another
rider who puts his suit on a hanger and inside a plastic bag (such as
one gets from a dry cleaner). He hangs it on the top of his back pack.
I'm not really tall enough to risk that.

On days that are, or promise to be, wet, I fold my clothes as normal but
put them into two plastic shopping bags. The inner bag sits on the
bottom of the back pack, the outer bag sits on the top. The overall
effect is that it becomes very difficult for water to get at my clothes.

I do like the pragmatic suggestion a prior poster made about taking a
taxi.

Best of luck on the interview.
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
says...
>
> I've been cycling to work most of the past year (about 3KM). This time
> of year, it's cool enough that I could wear my suit and not get sweaty,
> but it's wet enough that I could still get splashed.
>
> I gently fold my suit (and shirt) and put it in my backpack. Given the
> short duration of my trip, creasing isn't an issue. >


Why not hang it up and leave it at work?

--
Tony

"The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has
taken place"
George Bernard Shaw
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
says...
>
> I've been cycling to work most of the past year (about 3KM). This time
> of year, it's cool enough that I could wear my suit and not get sweaty,
> but it's wet enough that I could still get splashed.
>
> I gently fold my suit (and shirt) and put it in my backpack. Given the
> short duration of my trip, creasing isn't an issue. >


Why not hang it up and leave it at work?

--
Tony

"The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has
taken place"
George Bernard Shaw
 
D

Don Whybrow

Guest
Tony Raven wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
> says...
>> I've been cycling to work most of the past year (about 3KM). This time
>> of year, it's cool enough that I could wear my suit and not get sweaty,
>> but it's wet enough that I could still get splashed.
>>
>> I gently fold my suit (and shirt) and put it in my backpack. Given the
>> short duration of my trip, creasing isn't an issue. >

>
> Why not hang it up and leave it at work?


My thoughts as well. I am fortunate in that I have a locker at work and
we have changing/shower facilities. In my locker I keep a full set of
clothes. One day each week I do a laundry run with full panniers to
stock up on clean shirts etc. and take the dirty ones home. The rest of
the time I don't need to carry anything.

--
Don Whybrow

Sequi Bonum Non Time

People must not do things for fun. We are not here for fun.
There is no reference to fun in any Act of Parliament.
 
D

Don Whybrow

Guest
Tony Raven wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
> says...
>> I've been cycling to work most of the past year (about 3KM). This time
>> of year, it's cool enough that I could wear my suit and not get sweaty,
>> but it's wet enough that I could still get splashed.
>>
>> I gently fold my suit (and shirt) and put it in my backpack. Given the
>> short duration of my trip, creasing isn't an issue. >

>
> Why not hang it up and leave it at work?


My thoughts as well. I am fortunate in that I have a locker at work and
we have changing/shower facilities. In my locker I keep a full set of
clothes. One day each week I do a laundry run with full panniers to
stock up on clean shirts etc. and take the dirty ones home. The rest of
the time I don't need to carry anything.

--
Don Whybrow

Sequi Bonum Non Time

People must not do things for fun. We are not here for fun.
There is no reference to fun in any Act of Parliament.
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] says...
>
> My thoughts as well. I am fortunate in that I have a locker at work and
> we have changing/shower facilities. In my locker I keep a full set of
> clothes. One day each week I do a laundry run with full panniers to
> stock up on clean shirts etc. and take the dirty ones home. The rest of
> the time I don't need to carry anything.
>


Why not wear the shirt each day cycling in?

> People must not do things for fun. We are not here for fun.
> There is no reference to fun in any Act of Parliament.


Not quite. See The Education (Curriculum Minimum Content) Order
(Northern Ireland) 2007 Schedule II Part 2

Pupils should be enabled to:
- participate in fun activities and physical challenges enabling them to
begin to learn, understand and develop the core skills of running,
jumping and throwing individually and in a co-operative context, using a
variety of equipment;
- practise simple running techniques in a variety of fun activities;
- practise jumping and throwing activities, initially from a stationary
position progressing to a controlled run-up;
- measure performance in simple athletic activities.

OK, OK its an Order, not an Act ;-)


--
Tony

"The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has
taken place"
George Bernard Shaw
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] says...
>
> My thoughts as well. I am fortunate in that I have a locker at work and
> we have changing/shower facilities. In my locker I keep a full set of
> clothes. One day each week I do a laundry run with full panniers to
> stock up on clean shirts etc. and take the dirty ones home. The rest of
> the time I don't need to carry anything.
>


Why not wear the shirt each day cycling in?

> People must not do things for fun. We are not here for fun.
> There is no reference to fun in any Act of Parliament.


Not quite. See The Education (Curriculum Minimum Content) Order
(Northern Ireland) 2007 Schedule II Part 2

Pupils should be enabled to:
- participate in fun activities and physical challenges enabling them to
begin to learn, understand and develop the core skills of running,
jumping and throwing individually and in a co-operative context, using a
variety of equipment;
- practise simple running techniques in a variety of fun activities;
- practise jumping and throwing activities, initially from a stationary
position progressing to a controlled run-up;
- measure performance in simple athletic activities.

OK, OK its an Order, not an Act ;-)


--
Tony

"The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has
taken place"
George Bernard Shaw