advice on carrying a suit on a bike



D

Don Whybrow

Guest
Tony Raven wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> [email protected] says...
>> My thoughts as well. I am fortunate in that I have a locker at work and
>> we have changing/shower facilities. In my locker I keep a full set of
>> clothes. One day each week I do a laundry run with full panniers to
>> stock up on clean shirts etc. and take the dirty ones home. The rest of
>> the time I don't need to carry anything.

>
> Why not wear the shirt each day cycling in?


My commute in, whilst not very long at about 6 miles, has enough hills
both up and down [1] for me to generate a sweat even when it is cold.
When I get to work I *need* to change into a clean one after a shower, YMMV.

>> People must not do things for fun. We are not here for fun.
>> There is no reference to fun in any Act of Parliament.

>
> Not quite. See The Education (Curriculum Minimum Content) Order
> (Northern Ireland) 2007 Schedule II Part 2
>
> Pupils should be enabled to:
> - participate in fun activities and physical challenges enabling them to
> begin to learn, understand and develop the core skills of running,
> jumping and throwing individually and in a co-operative context, using a
> variety of equipment;
> - practise simple running techniques in a variety of fun activities;
> - practise jumping and throwing activities, initially from a stationary
> position progressing to a controlled run-up;
> - measure performance in simple athletic activities.
>
> OK, OK its an Order, not an Act ;-)


Of all the people on this group, if I were to have to make a bet on who
would pick up on a quote from a sig line, the shortest odds would be on
Dr Raven. Sig generator updated to include the exception quoted. You may
see it appear later.


[1] On a fixie, a steep downhill can be as much effort as moderate uphill.

--
Don Whybrow

Sequi Bonum Non Time

You guys got something against spam? (Vriess, in _Alien 4_)
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] says...
>
> Of all the people on this group, if I were to have to make a bet on who
> would pick up on a quote from a sig line, the shortest odds would be on
> Dr Raven. Sig generator updated to include the exception quoted. You may
> see it appear later.
>


;-)

--
Tony

"The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has
taken place"
George Bernard Shaw
 
D

dkahn400

Guest
On Nov 9, 10:13 pm, Nick Kew <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Fri, 09 Nov 2007 20:36:46 -0000
>
> Duncan Smith <[email protected]> wrote:
> > Or wet or muddy... Can you lay your hands on some waterproof panniers
> > in time? Works for taking my clothes into work, if you're careful

>
> Try with caution. One of my best white shirts is the one I had to buy
> in a hurry, after cycling to an event with a shirt in my pannier, and
> encountering serious rain on the way. Under normal circumstances, the
> shirt in my pannier would've been right for the occasion. But ...


The secret is to use a tough waterproof bag inside the pannier. I find
clear sacks used in office shredding machines work well. Pack the
clothes into a corner of the sack then fold the sack over the clothes
making a pannier shaped package that slides into the pannier in one
piece.

--
Dave...
 
D

dkahn400

Guest
On Nov 11, 8:56 am, Tony Raven <[email protected]> wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
> says...


> > I gently fold my suit (and shirt) and put it in my backpack. Given the
> > short duration of my trip, creasing isn't an issue. >

>
> Why not hang it up and leave it at work?


Leave suit, shoes, towel, soap, razor at work. Cycle in with shirt,
tie, underpants and socks folded into a waterproof package and easily
slipped into a small pannier or back pack.

--
Dave...
 
P

Phil Cook

Guest
vernon wrote:

>
>"Marc Brett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]
>> On Sat, 10 Nov 2007 09:53:08 -0000, "vernon" <[email protected]>
>> wrote:
>>
>>>"Adam Lea" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>>news:[email protected]
>>>>I have a job interview on Monday and I was planning to do the journey by
>>>>train and folding bike. It involves an overnight stop which is about a 7
>>>>mile journey from the station and the venue is about 4 miles from where I
>>>>will be staying. As I will need a suit what is the best way to fold and
>>>>carry this on a bike without it getting creased? I was thinking of just
>>>>wearing it on the journey but I don't want to get it all sweaty prior to
>>>>the interview.


>>><pragmatism>
>>>If getting the job is very important to you can get a taxi then you have
>>>less to fret about. You can then focus on the interview and you can
>>>guarantee your freshness and appearance.
>>></pramatism>

>>
>>
>> For my first "real" job, I rode, all hot and sweaty, to the interview.
>> Cycling's eccentricity, pragmatism, and low ******** factor made a
>> positive impression and was definitely a reason for my winning the
>> position.


>Try convincing an interview panel that your dishevelled appearance should
>not disadvantage you when applying for posts which demand high standards of
>personal grooming....


>If the interview requires a suit then it merits being displayed in a dry,
>crease-free state filled by a relaxed interviewee who's quietly optimistic
>about getting the job having done all the pre-interview research and
>preparation.
>
>I'd personally leave cycling in the hobbies and interest box on the
>application form.
>
>But each to their own taste.....


But Marc says he had no choice in the matter. It was either cycle or
stay at home.

Now to practical advice. When I need to carry a suit in a small(ish)
bag I invert one of the jacket's shoulders and put the other into it
so that the lining is facing out [1] then lay the trousers on the
jacket loosely fold it in three. The trick is to make the folds loose
you don't want to crease it by making tight folds. Then if you are on
the bike get a good plastic bag and slip the bundle into that and then
into a pannier. The suit should be all that you put in a normal sized
pannier anything else will make it too full. The other thing is to
maximise the amount of time that the suit is worn before you go into
the interview and minimise the amount of time it is folded.

[1] Hold the jacket by the shoulders with the buttons faving you with
your left hand inside the shoulder grasp the seam and turn it inside
out so that the front of that side is behind the back. then fold the
other shoulder into it.
--
Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
 
R

raisethe

Guest
x-no-archive:
<snip suit folding discussion>

When I used to be a suit, I left the jacket on the back of my chair.
It stayed there for three years, hardly ever worn, day or night. I
worked in a starchy profession, but no-one was ever fussed by my lack
of jacket wearing. In the end, I took it home, and have only worn one
since at weddings and funerals.

So my suggestion would be to ditch the jacket, wear the shirt and
trousers and carry the tie. Cycle slowly.

And for the interview, wear the jacket. W
 
R

raisethe

Guest
x-no-archive: On 11 Nov, 11:34, raisethe <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> <snip suit folding discussion>
>
> When I used to be a suit, I left the jacket on the back of my chair.
> It stayed there for three years, hardly ever worn, day or night. I
> worked in a starchy profession, but no-one was ever fussed by my lack
> of jacket wearing. In the end, I took it home, and have only worn one
> since at weddings and funerals.
>
> So my suggestion would be to ditch the jacket, wear the shirt and
> trousers and carry the tie. Cycle slowly.
>
> And for the interview, wear the jacket.


Wool is quite breathable in any case.
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
cook.freeserve.co.uk says...
>
>
> The other thing is to
> maximise the amount of time that the suit is worn before you go into
> the interview and minimise the amount of time it is folded.


If it gets creased the old travelling salesman technique, although not
very green these days, is to hang it up next to the shower and turn it
on hot. The steam will drop all the creases out but make sure its not
where it will get wet.

>
> [1] Hold the jacket by the shoulders with the buttons faving you with
> your left hand inside the shoulder grasp the seam and turn it inside
> out so that the front of that side is behind the back. then fold the
> other shoulder into it.
>


For folding shirts, t-shirts etc, its worth learning the Japanese shirt
folding technique.
http://www.albinoblacksheep.com/flash/fold

--
Tony

"The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has
taken place"
George Bernard Shaw
 
C

congokid

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Phil Cook
<[email protected]> writes

>The other thing is to
>maximise the amount of time that the suit is worn before you go into
>the interview and minimise the amount of time it is folded.


When I collected my new suits from my tailor, he folded them tightly,
together with the two pairs of trousers in each, into a brown
paper-wrapped package that would have withstood any amount of
mishandling.

I was only taking them home, though, not to wear at an interview, but
they looked fine when I put them on hangers afterward.
--
congokid
Eating out in London? Read my tips...
http://congokid.com
 
A

Adam Lea

Guest
Thanks for all the advice.

Unfortunatly I chickened out and took the car (it was raining at the time I
would have left on the bike). I will now have to do 340 miles of extra
utility cycling to compensate.

Adam
 
G

Graeme Dods

Guest
On Nov 13, 5:35 am, "Adam Lea" <[email protected]> wrote:
> Thanks for all the advice.
>
> Unfortunatly I chickened out and took the car (it was raining at the time I
> would have left on the bike). I will now have to do 340 miles of extra
> utility cycling to compensate.


Now comes the wait to see if you got the job. I hope you do (if it's
one you want). In a job interview a couple of years ago I almost
fainted (due to some bug picked up from my son combined with skipping
lunch) after having garbled some possibly loopy answers to their
questions. I still got the job :)

Graeme
 
A

Adam Lea

Guest
"Graeme Dods" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:1194933594.[email protected]
> On Nov 13, 5:35 am, "Adam Lea" <[email protected]> wrote:
>> Thanks for all the advice.
>>
>> Unfortunatly I chickened out and took the car (it was raining at the time
>> I
>> would have left on the bike). I will now have to do 340 miles of extra
>> utility cycling to compensate.

>
> Now comes the wait to see if you got the job. I hope you do (if it's
> one you want). In a job interview a couple of years ago I almost
> fainted (due to some bug picked up from my son combined with skipping
> lunch) after having garbled some possibly loopy answers to their
> questions. I still got the job :)
>
> Graeme
>


I'll hear something around early December. Unfortunatly one of the
candidates going for the same position as me is a very attractive blonde
woman so I won't hold my breath.
 
R

Rob Morley

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Adam Lea
[email protected] says...

> I'll hear something around early December. Unfortunatly one of the
> candidates going for the same position as me is a very attractive blonde
> woman so I won't hold my breath.
>

Management won't want her distracting other employees, so you're at an
advantage. ;-)
 
D

David Hansen

Guest
On Mon, 12 Nov 2007 21:59:54 -0800 someone who may be Graeme Dods
<[email protected]> wrote this:-

>Now comes the wait to see if you got the job. I hope you do (if it's
>one you want). In a job interview a couple of years ago I almost
>fainted (due to some bug picked up from my son combined with skipping
>lunch) after having garbled some possibly loopy answers to their
>questions. I still got the job :)


AOL. The interviews I thought I had done well in invariably turned
out to be the ones I got nowhere. OTOH the ones I thought I had done
badly in were the ones I got the job.



--
David Hansen, Edinburgh
I will *always* explain revoked encryption keys, unless RIP prevents me
http://www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts2000/00023--e.htm#54
 
D

David Hansen

Guest
On Tue, 13 Nov 2007 08:58:43 -0000 someone who may be "Adam Lea"
<[email protected]> wrote this:-

>Unfortunatly one of the
>candidates going for the same position as me is a very attractive blonde
>woman so I won't hold my breath.


Very attractive blond women (and very attractive women with other
hair colourings) tell me that this can be as much of a curse as a
blessing. My observations bear this out.



--
David Hansen, Edinburgh
I will *always* explain revoked encryption keys, unless RIP prevents me
http://www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts2000/00023--e.htm#54
 
A

Adam Lea

Guest
"David Hansen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Tue, 13 Nov 2007 08:58:43 -0000 someone who may be "Adam Lea"
> <[email protected]> wrote this:-
>
>>Unfortunatly one of the
>>candidates going for the same position as me is a very attractive blonde
>>woman so I won't hold my breath.

>
> Very attractive blond women (and very attractive women with other
> hair colourings) tell me that this can be as much of a curse as a
> blessing. My observations bear this out.
>


Interesting. Why do you think this is?
 
G

Graeme Dods

Guest
On Nov 13, 11:24 pm, David Hansen <[email protected]>
wrote:
> On Mon, 12 Nov 2007 21:59:54 -0800 someone who may be Graeme Dods
> <[email protected]> wrote this:-
>
> >Now comes the wait to see if you got the job. I hope you do (if it's
> >one you want). In a job interview a couple of years ago I almost
> >fainted (due to some bug picked up from my son combined with skipping
> >lunch) after having garbled some possibly loopy answers to their
> >questions. I still got the job :)

>
> AOL. The interviews I thought I had done well in invariably turned
> out to be the ones I got nowhere. OTOH the ones I thought I had done
> badly in were the ones I got the job.


I've been really lucky, with one exception I've got the job for every
position I've been interviewed for over the years. Last year I was in
the rather surprising position of half a dozen companies calling me
when they found out I'd been made redundant. Now the company that made
me redundant has asked if I'd like to come back. I'm sure that one of
these days they'll realise I'm **** :-/

Graeme
 
G

Graeme Dods

Guest
On Nov 14, 3:13 am, "Adam Lea" <[email protected]> wrote:
> "David Hansen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>
> news:[email protected]
>
> > On Tue, 13 Nov 2007 08:58:43 -0000 someone who may be "Adam Lea"
> > <[email protected]> wrote this:-

>
> >>Unfortunatly one of the
> >>candidates going for the same position as me is a very attractive blonde
> >>woman so I won't hold my breath.

>
> > Very attractive blond women (and very attractive women with other
> > hair colourings) tell me that this can be as much of a curse as a
> > blessing. My observations bear this out.

>
> Interesting. Why do you think this is?


Personal experience. The curse is that David follows them round with a
goofy smile on his face. ;-)

Graeme
 
C

CoyoteBoy

Guest
On 9 Nov, 20:10, "Adam Lea" <[email protected]> wrote:
> I have a job interview on Monday and I was planning to do the journey by
> train and folding bike. It involves an overnight stop which is about a 7
> mile journey from the station and the venue is about 4 miles from where I
> will be staying. As I will need a suit what is the best way to fold and
> carry this on a bike without it getting creased? I was thinking of just
> wearing it on the journey but I don't want to get it all sweaty prior to the
> interview.
>
> Adam


I personally wouldnt bother. An going to an interview by bike is above
and beyond the call of duty and will end up with you getting less than
favourable results due to the fact that there is no way of preventing
clothes creasage when going by bike.