Advice re wheels please

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by Livestrong1966, Jul 11, 2010.

  1. Livestrong1966

    Livestrong1966 New Member

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    Hi I'm thinking of getting some campag bora ones for road use in - do you think they will be ok for occasional commute? Or do you think the ride will be uncomfortable? Too stiff? I know the wheels are tough enough. Any thoughts?
     
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  2. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    Those wheels are more for racing. If you need a set of racing wheels then buy those, but then switch to a more street friendly 32 spoke wheels like the Mavic Open Pro for commuting. Money shouldn't be a problem to afford two wheel sets for you since your considering wanting to spend over $3k on one set of wheels, what's another $400? And you would be saving your expensive wheels from everyday wear and tear and street damage.
     
  3. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    What's the primary use of the wheels going to be? What do you weigh? Campy Boras are plenty tough, and at around $2350-ish for a set of Bora Ones, the price is attractive. Since they're tubular wheels, you can run a comparatively low pressure in them to take the edge off the ride. That said, they're not known for giving an abusive ride.

    I've had three different deep rimmed CF wheelsets, ranging in rim depth from 46mm to 55mm. All of them had a decent ride quality and weren't what I'd call "uncomfortable." Of course, deep rims aren't built for commuting, but the odd commute shouldn't be a big threat for the wheels, assuming you don't do a lot of curb jumping, bunny hopping, and the like.....and you don't have an excessive load onboard the bike.

    Will the Bora Ones be your only wheelset?
     
  4. Livestrong1966

    Livestrong1966 New Member

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    Thanks :) I weigh 11st, 9lbs and was thinking this would be my main wheelset to begin. I am also thinking of a pair of Camp Zonda Black might make more sense? The commute is 15 miles round trip thru central london. I love the look of the Boras and would mean I could race on them too. :confused:
     
  5. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Well, at a bit over 11 stone, you're not going to overwhelm the Boras. That said, if you're new to racing and the wheels will see the odd commute, the Zondas are a better choice, especially if you're unsure about mucking about with tubulars. Choosing the Zondas over the Boras isn't going to really cost you anything noticeable in terms of performance. You'll save money, though, money which can put toward other tasty bits.

    Even better yet would be to get a set of custom wheels built.
     
  6. Baldie

    Baldie New Member

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    I'd choose Neutrons over Zonda's... I think one of the mags has just reviewed them and agrees.
     
  7. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    The Zondas are easier at installing tires or repairing flats then the Neutron, the reports are that they are a pain the ass for this.

    Personally I think handmade wheels would be better. You can save quite a bit of cash, get a lighter yet stronger wheel by going with Mavic Open Pro CD rims with DT Revolution spokes and aluminum nipples, though I prefer brass even though their about 50grms heavier they last far longer. On top of that the factory Compaq wheels cost at least twice as much to repair spoke breakage-that is if you can even find the replacement spokes!

    Of course you won't have that "bling" factor with custom wheels vs the Compaq's, but you would be far better off in the long run.
     
  8. Eichers

    Eichers New Member

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    I currently have a normal DA 7800 53/39 groupset and was considering changing the crank set to a 7950 or 6750 crank set. But after discussions with another rider the following idea arose:
     
    That is to use one of the new MTB XT Dyna Sys 10 spd 11-34 cassettes with a MTB 9 spd XT(M772) or XTR(M972) GS/SGS RD (which should be index compatible with my DA 7800 STI lever). I am not sure, though, whether to use a GS Medium Cage or a SGS Long Cage?
     
    I believe that the 9 spd derailleur will become a 10 spd derailleur when used with the DA 7800 STI, because it has the same 2:1 pull ratio as the DA 7800 STI lever. Also, the 9 spd cassettes are the same width as the 10 spd cassettes. Theoretically, I should be able to use the 7800 chain with a couple more links added or simply use a new 6700 or 7900 chain.
     
    This option would give more range than using a 7950 compact crankset and if I really needed to I could then later go to a compact crank.
     
    What do you think of this idea for lots of touring and lots of hill climbing?
     
  9. Serious Chris

    Serious Chris New Member

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    Am I clear in saying you're thinking of staying with a double crank set, but changing the cartridge from 9 to 10 speed?
    If that's the case, wouldn't you net greater versatility by just going to a triple crank set?
    Correct me if I misunderstand your intent.
     
  10. Eichers

    Eichers New Member

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    Yes, staying with the 7800 53/39 crankset.
     
    No, the current cassette is already a 10 spd cassette. Also, the DA 7800 STI lever is 10 spd.
     
    The idea is that you do not need to change the crankset/STI levers/FD and is another alternative to a drop in (plug n play) compact 6750 or 7950 crankset.
     
  11. Serious Chris

    Serious Chris New Member

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    Ok, I follow.
     
    Acknowledging your question, "What do you think of this idea for lots of touring and lots of hill climbing?"
    I would really suggest changing to a triple up front; would it not be a lot more useful in-general than switching between compacts?
    That way you'd always have the gear you want and never have to actually swap anything out.
    I love the triple on my bike. Even though the cassette is 9 speed, I always have the versatility I need/want.
    It's allowed me to climb some pretty crazy shit here in the foothills.
     
    Just playing devil's advocate.
     
  12. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    for a 11-34 cassette yes you need a long cage rear derrailleur.
     
  13. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Why not use a 10 speed set up like an IRD 11-32 10 speed cassette and an XT or XTR (with barrel adjuster)? They do a 11-36 in 10 speed but I'm not sure that the XT or XTR will work with the 36.
     
    I use the 7800 STI levers/11-32/XTR rear on some long mountainous rides and it shifts very well - only a fraction slower than with a Dura Ace cassette and rear mech.
     
  14. Eichers

    Eichers New Member

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    Thanks vspa /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
    Swampy, that's great. Nice to hear that it works very well /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
    What model rear derailleur did you use?
    I think at a stretch an XT should work with 11-36 but not sure about the XTR. The XTR should work with an 11-34, because you can get these in 9 spd cassettes.
     
     
     
  15. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Why use an 11-tooth top on your cassette with a 53-tooth chainring? Those MTB cassettes are made to be used with small chainrings, and a 53-11 is a leg-breaker, standard equipment for pro road sprinters and their leadout men, but hardly anybody else.
     
  16. Eichers

    Eichers New Member

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    Yes you are right, but it's just simpler, because the cassettes come as 11-32/34/36. Just like the road version 11 or 12-23/25/27/28.
     
  17. Eichers

    Eichers New Member

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    Yes you are right oldbobcat, but the 11-34 cassette is a standard size ... just easier.
     
    I have not done this yet, Swampy1970 has, but I plan too, The local Shimano fellow does not think that it will work /img/vbsmilies/smilies/frown.gif
     
    I will have another chat to a friend and get some model details and why he thinks it will work /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
  18. BluesDawg

    BluesDawg New Member

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    The trick there is finding a cassette with a 34 or 32 tooh cog without an 11. I think SRAM may be making a 12-32 for Apex.
     
     
  19. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    XTR - the last model year they made with before going to a non-barrel adjuster design - 2007 or 2008 I think...
     
  20. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Just to add - it also works well with Dura Ace 7900 STI levers too...
    ... and 7800 bar end shifters...
    ... as well as the 7800 STIs.
     
    Not as supernaturally fast as a complete Dura Ace drive train (shifters, rear mech, cassette, chain, cables) but more than fast enough to change well even out of the saddle going hard. Then again, XTR is hardly rubbish... so it's no surprise really that it does shift well. I suspect that the very slight hesitations in shifting (and I mean almost imperceptably small) are due to the IRD cassette teeth design as well as the gaps between the teeth. Pitty a set of braces won't fix the latter :p Maybe more races will... ;)
     
     
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