Advice requested - Which would you choose?



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T

The Captain

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I've been doing some shopping for a new mountain bike. I've had mine for 10+ years, (Univega Alpina
Uno) and it's time for something new. I'm not a hardcore singletrack biker, but I want something
versatile that will last for another 10+ years.

I'm working within the $500-600 range for a decent hardtail. I've narrowed it down to a couple of
bikes, but am having trouble making a final decision. I've looked at mtbreview.com and it's helpful
but I'd like more input. Here are my finalists:

Candidate 1: Raleigh M80

I'd like the disc model, but it's totally unavailable in my area (Denver), and besides, the non-disc
model is fine for my needs. Componetry is great, Shimano LX across the board. Feels pretty good, the
shock it marginal (Judy TT). Frame is okay, but not great.

Candidate 2: Gary Fisher Tassajara

Same story with the disc model - can't find one in the Denver area. Frame is nice, componetry is
so-so. Mixed Deore, but you get a slightly better fork, a Pilot TT. Seat sucks, like sitting with a
brick wedged in your a**.

As far as riding both of them, just what can you tell in the parking lot of the LBS anyway?
They both seemed similar to me. I've also looked at the Trek 4900, Marin Palisades Trail,
Specialized Hardrock, Giant Iguana, etc, but the above two seem to stand out as the best buys
in the price range.

If you've got something to say about either bike, or want to tell me about something I haven't
considered, please do so.

Thanks -

Jeff
 
L

Lightweight

Guest
"The Captain" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I've been doing some shopping for a new mountain bike. I've had mine for 10+ years, (Univega
> Alpina Uno) and it's time for something new. I'm not
a
> hardcore singletrack biker, but I want something versatile that will last for another 10+ years.
>
>
>
> I'm working within the $500-600 range for a decent hardtail. I've
narrowed
> it down to a couple of bikes, but am having trouble making a final
decision.
> I've looked at mtbreview.com and it's helpful but I'd like more input.
Here
> are my finalists:
>
>
>
> Candidate 1: Raleigh M80
>
> I'd like the disc model, but it's totally unavailable in my area (Denver), and besides, the
> non-disc model is fine for my needs. Componetry is
great,
> Shimano LX across the board. Feels pretty good, the shock it marginal (Judy TT). Frame is okay,
> but not great.
>
>
>
> Candidate 2: Gary Fisher Tassajara
>
> Same story with the disc model - can't find one in the Denver area. Frame is nice, componetry is
> so-so. Mixed Deore, but you get a slightly better fork, a Pilot TT. Seat sucks, like sitting with
> a brick wedged in your
a**.
>
>
>
> As far as riding both of them, just what can you tell in the parking lot
of
> the LBS anyway? They both seemed similar to me. I've also looked at the Trek 4900, Marin Palisades
> Trail, Specialized Hardrock, Giant Iguana, etc, but the above two seem to stand out as the best
> buys in the price range.
>
>
>
> If you've got something to say about either bike, or want to tell me about something I haven't
> considered, please do so.
>
>
>
> Thanks -
>
>
>
> Jeff
>

I suggest saving $100-$200 more and buying one level up. I really like the Giant Rainier, it really
is a quality bike for the price. I'm riding and Trek 6700, and the frame is good, but some
components could use upgrading (although no big downfalls to complain about other than the seat
post). If you're looking for a bike that'll last, the 6700 has a solid frame, but it's very
unforgiving as a hardtail. The flex in this thing is about zero, a lot of people like this setup,
but it is harsh on the calves on bombing downhill runs. I'm unfamiliar with the above bikes, but I
would suggest getting a non-disc brake bike in that price range. And if you aren't anywhere near
hardcore, anything will last you 10 years with proper maintenance.
 
J

John G

Guest
The Captain wrote:

> If you've got something to say about either bike, or want to tell me about something I haven't
> considered, please do so.

I'd have to say that that you should (for the most part) ignore the
grouppo and concentrate on the frame. IMO, when you are buying a bike,
Invest in the best quality and fitting FRAME. It is the core of the bike
and should outlast all the things hanging off of it. As stuff break or
wears out, and your knowledge of what you like and don't like grows, and
you figure out what you are really looking for out of your bike, simply
replace the old stuff higher level, or more suitible componentry. The
frame _is_ the heart of the bike and where you should spend your money.
 
B

Bb

Guest
On Tue, 01 Apr 2003 11:03:51 -0500, John G wrote:

> I'd have to say that that you should (for the most part) ignore the grouppo and concentrate on
> the frame.

FOR THE MOST PART is right! The frame is very important (as replacing it means getting a new bike),
but the price of replacing parts is very high. Its much cheaper in the long-run to get good
components with the bike, than to replace perfectly good parts (like many/most of us do) because you
really wanted something better.

--
-BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
 
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