Advice?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Ibarrafm, Jun 1, 2010.

  1. Ibarrafm

    Ibarrafm New Member

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    I'm a new cycling I have a 09 raleigh grand sport. I'm planning on riding 100 miles with some friends in September and since buying a new bike is out of the question I wanted to know of some upgrades I can do that aren't TOO expensive as I only paid $750 for the bike. I know new to cycling and 100 miles don't go together but I'm not terribly out of shape. My fifth ride on this bike was a metric century. Here are the specs on my bike, if anyone can steer me in the right direction I would appriciate it greatly!
    Frame
    Aluminum
    Fork
    Carbon
    Crankset
    FSA Omega Compact, 50/34
    Bottom bracket
    FSA Mega Exo External bearing
    Shifters
    Shimano 2200 STI
    Front derailleur
    Shimano 2200
    Rear derailleur
    Shimano Sora
    Rear cogs
    Shimano HG50, 12-25, 8-speed
    Number of gears
    16
    Brakes
    Tektro Dual Pivot
    Brake levers
    Shimano 2200 STI
    Rims
    Freedom RLX 1.9 Double Wall
    Front hub
    Joytech Alloy QR, 32h
    Rear hub
    Joytech Alloy QR, 32h
    Tires
    Vittoria Zaffiro, 700x25
    Handlebar
    Alloy Road
    Stem
    Alloy 3D
    Seat post
    Alloy microadjustable
    Saddle
    Avenir 200 Series
    Pedals
    Road Pedals
    Headset
    FSA Integrated
    Chain
    KMC Z82
     
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  2. root

    root New Member

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    You don't need any upgrades. Just ride your bike and wear it out. My first bike cost $50 and I rode 30,000 km on it before upgrading to a $150 bike :D (both were steel bikes in early 90s with DT shifters and heavy steel rims with 25mm wide heavy tires that lasted all 30,000 without being changed).

    Once you have 20,000 - 30,000 km on the bike, you will know better what annoys you about the current bike and what needs to be better quality.
     
  3. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    If something about the bike doesn't fit you like the stem, or maybe the saddle is comfortable, then upgrade those parts but I would check on a complete bike that you feel suits your needs before changing a bunch of components.
    It is usually cheaper to buy a built bike unless you just enjoy tweaking and upgrading.
     
  4. maydog

    maydog Well-Known Member

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    There is no reason you and your bike cant go 100 miles. The only changes you should do early on is to maximize your comfort while riding. This may mean upgrading/swapping out your saddle and possibly consider clipless pedals and shoes.

    The saddles that came on my entry level bikes all made me go numb, I was lucky to find an inexpensive (<$40) model that works for me on metric double centuries.

    Also think about spending some cash on gear and tools. A good pair of cycle shorts will make a century much more bearable. Having the basic tools and repair skills are also a must, unless you have a designated mechanic in the group.

    Lastly, keep your wheels maintained. I have found that the entry level bikes use decent quality reliable components, but the wheels and tires are usually a weak link. I and my fellow >220lb riders have busted many rear spokes on similar wheelsets, even 36h. Make sure that the wheels have even tension and are properly trued this will increase their lifespan. I always carry extra spokes and a cassette tool. I would ride the wheels until / if they become a problem.
     
  5. Ibarrafm

    Ibarrafm New Member

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    Thanks to all! I think I'm gonna stick to some clipless pedals and shoes and look into wheels and tires before I take my long ride.
     
  6. CdnRider

    CdnRider New Member

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    Shoes and pedals for sure. Hold off on the wheels until you put down a good amount of mileage to get to know the bike. Otherwise you may not really notice the difference.

    As other posters have said. Doesn't look like you need to upgrade any partS of the bike just yet.

    Just ride......
     
  7. LB CYCLIST

    LB CYCLIST New Member

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    if u dont have clipless shoesand pedals i would look into em before anything else, not less your uncomfortable with some thing then look into that.

    some shops have specials were u can buy the shoes and pedals as a package and save a few dollars.

    keep us posted and good luck on your ride.
     
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