Aero bars causing pain on groin area

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by rudycyclist, Jul 9, 2006.

  1. rudycyclist

    rudycyclist New Member

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    I rode my first TT today and I did well but had trouble staying in my aero bars because I was getting some pretty bad soreness in my groinal area. Should I buy a new saddle just for TT's? Or should I just try to adjust my saddle a little bit to fit me better while I'm in the aero bar position?
     
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  2. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    Bring the saddle further forward and nose it down a little before trying a new one.
     
  3. rudycyclist

    rudycyclist New Member

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    Actually I forgot to mention that I actually brought the saddle back a little bit before my race. I felt like my body was a little more stretched out, but I will definitely try putting it forward to where it was.
     
  4. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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    When you run out of rails on the seat, try a Thompson (or similar) zero offset seat post. You should find, if the frame is the right size, you will end up with an effective seat post angle of 75-77 degrees. Also consider flipping the stem to bring the elbows up higher, to a more comfortable position.

    There are some good articles on Tri/TT bike fit here: http://www.trysport.com.au/services.htm
     
  5. gregkeller

    gregkeller New Member

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    This was a problem i ran into when trying to modify my road bike for TT's. I found to get aero i had to move the seat forward. But because i was moving the seat forward you are effectively shortening your saddle height, so you will probably have to raise your seatpost a little. That will get your hips higher in relation to your arms and help flatten out your back. Easiest thing to do if you are going to do lots of TT's is to get a 0 setback post and a tri specific saddle, have them set up and then you only have to swap out the post when you are doing a TT or training for one (should be on that bike once a week to stay used to that position).
     
  6. Future-pro

    Future-pro New Member

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    Bringing the saddle forward will help wouldn't recommend tilting the saddle down though. Your best bet is to have a level saddle that way you be in a familar position to the rode bike and therefore more powerful (I think). Try using plenty of chamois cream that might help.
     
  7. gregkeller

    gregkeller New Member

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    I would agree with not nosing the saddle down, i did this by mistake and felt like i was sliding off the saddle, made my arms tired, when i got home i got out the level and sure enough it was nosed down just a little. A level saddle is the way to go.
     
  8. wilmar13

    wilmar13 New Member

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    Another vote for putting the saddle tip down being a bad idea... I had the same problem on my TT bike... I raised the stem 30mm(spacers were over, not under) and not only did it become more comfortable, but I am now faster as well. My thought is that I do not have the necessary flexibility to have that low flat back position, maybe this is your problem as well. Raise your stem a little (and make sure your saddle is level), to see if this fixes your problem.
     
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