Aero bars

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Mark U., Jan 22, 2003.

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  1. Mark U.

    Mark U. Guest

    I want to race my road bike in time trials and am looking for some clip-on aero bars. I know this
    can get as involved as I want with position, fit, etc., etc., but I'm no contender, just want
    something that will get me a couple miles per hour more.

    Any recommendations on entry level bars - pros and cons? I'm leaning toward the Profile Airstryke
    2000. Here again I realize there are lots of opinions and preferences, but if anyone knows of
    something to definitely avoid or definitely get, that's what I'm looking for.

    Thanks!

    Mark U.
     
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  2. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    If you're going to keep your saddle position the same, go get yourself a new stem that is between 1
    & 2 cm shorter and has more rise than the one you have now. You're going to try and put your elbows
    where your hands are supposed to be and you need to compensate for that.

    The bolts on the Profiles are known to strip out the clamps.

    That help?

    Mike "Mark U." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I want to race my road bike in time trials and am looking for some clip-on aero bars. I know this
    > can get as involved as I want with position, fit, etc., etc., but I'm no contender, just want
    > something that will get me a couple miles per hour more.
    >
    > Any recommendations on entry level bars - pros and cons? I'm leaning
    toward
    > the Profile Airstryke 2000. Here again I realize there are lots of
    opinions
    > and preferences, but if anyone knows of something to definitely avoid or definitely get, that's
    > what I'm looking for.
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Mark U.
     
  3. Bob Denton

    Bob Denton Guest

    On Thu, 9 Jan 2003 17:57:31 -0800, "Mark U." <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I want to race my road bike in time trials and am looking for some clip-on aero bars. I know this
    >can get as involved as I want with position, fit, etc., etc., but I'm no contender, just want
    >something that will get me a couple miles per hour more.
    >
    >Any recommendations on entry level bars - pros and cons? I'm leaning toward the Profile Airstryke
    >2000. Here again I realize there are lots of opinions and preferences, but if anyone knows of
    >something to definitely avoid or definitely get, that's what I'm looking for.
    >
    >Thanks!
    >
    >Mark U.
    >
    Used both and prefer the Syntace for build, weight and comfort.

    cya Bob Denton Gulf Stream International Delray Beach, Florida www.sinkthestink.com Manufacturers of
    Sink the Stink
     
  4. Mike Demicco

    Mike Demicco Guest

    On Thu, 09 Jan 2003 17:57:31 -0800, Mark U. wrote:

    > Any recommendations on entry level bars - pros and cons? I'm leaning toward the Profile Airstryke
    > 2000. Here again I realize there are lots of opinions and preferences, but if anyone knows of
    > something to definitely avoid or definitely get, that's what I'm looking for.

    I'm using the original version of the Airstryke. I like them because the elbow pads pop up and out
    of the way when you don't need them. I like climbing with my hands on the bar top and the Airstrykes
    give me a lot of room. They are also quite adjustable.
     
  5. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    >I want to race my road bike in time trials and am looking for some clip-on aero bars. I know this
    >can get as involved as I want with position, fit, etc., etc., but I'm no contender, just want
    >something that will get me a couple miles per hour more.

    Thats asking a fair amount from a pair of aerobars. Especially if you don't fool with your position.

    >Any recommendations on entry level bars - pros and cons? I'm leaning toward the Profile
    >Airstryke 2000.

    I like the Profile bars but they do have a tendency to be and a reputation for being a bit chincy.

    Jon Isaacs
     
  6. Randomchris

    Randomchris Guest

    > If you're going to keep your saddle position the same, go get yourself a
    new
    > stem that is between 1 & 2 cm shorter and has more rise than the one you have now. You're going to
    > try and put your elbows where your hands are supposed to be and you need to compensate for that.

    This has got to be rubbish! Presumably the reason for using a road bike for time trials is that this
    is the only bike this person has. To shorten the reach and raise the bars may give a good TT
    position but will yield an unsuitable position for the other 90% of the time this bloke's out on his
    bike (training)! Also, for TTs you'd probably want your saddle a little further forwards (and higher
    as a result). This will result in a shorter reach, anyway.

    You'd be better off looking for the most adjustable tri-bars you can find so that your reach and the
    location of the elbow pads can be adjusted soley by adjusting the tri bars. 3T bio arms are well
    regarded for this. Far better to have a pair of tri-bars that put you in the right position than a
    pair that look the mutt's nuts but don't...

    Also Peter's point below about comfort is important. See if you can borrow some from someone in
    the club and note how they feel (too stretched, too low, etc) and you can be more informed about
    your decision.
     
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