Aero wheels vs regular wheels

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by fred, Feb 27, 2006.

  1. fred

    fred Guest

    I bought a bike on ebay that came with 2 sets of wheels; one is mavic
    aero wheels CXP30 and the other is a regular wheel, mavic ksyrium
    ssc. I usually do 20- 30 mile rides by myself on hilly terrain. Is
    there any reason to use aero wheels other than in a race? What is the
    advantage of one type of wheel over the other?
    Thanks.
    Fred
     
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  2. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 27 Feb 2006 16:49:21 -0800, "fred" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I bought a bike on ebay that came with 2 sets of wheels; one is mavic
    >aero wheels CXP30 and the other is a regular wheel, mavic ksyrium
    >ssc. I usually do 20- 30 mile rides by myself on hilly terrain. Is
    >there any reason to use aero wheels other than in a race? What is the
    >advantage of one type of wheel over the other?


    If the aero wheels aren't minimal-spoke types, they can have a
    stiffness advantage on rough roads; some can resist getting dinged
    better than a conventional rim. If they're the oh-so-chic ones with
    the large gaps between the spokes, beware of using them in areas with
    trees and the attendant common rodents; although the chances are low
    that the wheel will become an impromptu squirrel dicer, they are
    nonzero, and a 32-spoke or 36-spoke wheel stands a much better chance
    of deflecting the furry missile than of trapping it at speed and
    destroying the fork. Also, the more spokes you have, the less that
    any single spoke's breakage will contribute to making the wheel
    wobbly; with a 16- or 24-spoke rim, breaking one spoke often means
    that you're going to carry the bike home.
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  3. I have used aero rims and they just suck for changing the tubes, the
    high rim wall makes changing a flat a real pain. And usually they are a
    bit heavier than regular rim wheels. I had a pair of aero 28 spoke Fir
    rims built up and I ended up switching to a pair of Mavic regular rim
    wall 28 spoke Cosmos rims and I love them. I didn't feel the aero rims
    made me "faster", actually I feel they made the bike lighter and more
    agile. For hilly terrain, I see no reason why to use aero rims.
    -M
     
  4. Ron Ruff

    Ron Ruff Guest

    fred wrote:
    > I bought a bike on ebay that came with 2 sets of wheels; one is mavic
    > aero wheels CXP30 and the other is a regular wheel, mavic ksyrium
    > ssc. I usually do 20- 30 mile rides by myself on hilly terrain. Is
    > there any reason to use aero wheels other than in a race? What is the
    > advantage of one type of wheel over the other?
    > Thanks.
    > Fred


    The Ksyrium SSCs are expensive semi-aero low spoke count wheels. If the
    CXPs have more spokes and are in decent shape with good hubs, I'd keep
    them and sell the SSCs... I got $400 for the used set that came with my
    bike.

    The CXP30 is a good durable aero rim, and if it also has oval spokes it
    would be about as aero as you could get without going to a deep carbon
    wheel... but it is a small benefit and not important if you aren't
    racing. Those rims are fine for everyday riding too, though.

    How many spokes do they have? What kind of spokes? What hubs?
     
  5. On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 01:22:29 GMT, Werehatrack
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >roads; some can resist getting dinged
    >better than a conventional rim. If they're the oh-so-chic ones with
    >the large gaps between the spokes, beware of using them in areas with
    >trees and the attendant common rodents; although the chances are low
    >that the wheel will become an impromptu squirrel dicer, they are
    >nonzero, and a 32-spoke or 36-spoke wheel stands a much better chance
    >of deflecting the furry missile than of trapping it at speed and
    >destroying the fork.


    Wearing a hardhat while walking around the street is better protection
    against falling objects than a baseball cap. While rare, the chances
    of that happening are nonzero.

    JT



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  6. jim beam

    jim beam Guest

    fred wrote:
    > I bought a bike on ebay that came with 2 sets of wheels; one is mavic
    > aero wheels CXP30 and the other is a regular wheel, mavic ksyrium
    > ssc. I usually do 20- 30 mile rides by myself on hilly terrain. Is
    > there any reason to use aero wheels other than in a race? What is the
    > advantage of one type of wheel over the other?
    > Thanks.
    > Fred
    >

    since you already own both, why not ride both and see which you like the
    most?
     
  7. Mike Reed

    Mike Reed Guest

    I just went from Open Pros 32H front and rear to Velocity Deep-V (30mm
    deep) 32H/36H, and I have been able to measure a speed difference
    (Velocities are faster). I can't feel it though. The new wheels are
    heavier, but my hill repeat times on the steep stuff here in Austin are
    tracking with my training, not wheel weight.

    I like the high-spoke count aero better. So, in your situation, I would
    sell off the ksyriums. They're really popular, and worth more in cash
    form than wheel form. You might be able to get another bike (ss/fixie)
    for that money :)
     
  8. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    jim beam <[email protected]> writes:

    > fred wrote:
    >> I bought a bike on ebay that came with 2 sets of wheels; one is
    >> mavic aero wheels CXP30 and the other is a regular wheel, mavic
    >> ksyrium ssc. I usually do 20- 30 mile rides by myself on hilly
    >> terrain. Is there any reason to use aero wheels other than in a
    >> race? What is the advantage of one type of wheel over the other?


    Not much. Some people claim that they like the flywheel effect of the
    heavier wheels. Some other people think that weight is more important
    (especially when climbing).

    > since you already own both, why not ride both and see which you like
    > the most?


    Probably the best advice you're going to get.
     
  9. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 19:44:59 -0600, Tim McNamara
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >jim beam <[email protected]> writes:


    >> since you already own both, why not ride both and see which you like
    >> the most?

    >
    >Probably the best advice you're going to get.


    Yup. While you ride, think about what's more important; the bucks you
    can get for the surplus pair, or the stlye points you can get for the
    fancier ones. (I'm betting that you won't really be able to tell the
    difference between them on the bike.)
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  10. andresmuro

    andresmuro Guest

    Werehatrack wrote:
    While you ride, think about what's more important; the bucks you
    > can get for the surplus pair, or the stlye points you can get for the
    > fancier ones.


    And don't forget that image is everthing.

    Andres
     
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