afraid to ride again because of suspected chain derailment problem

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by urge2kill, Sep 6, 2013.

  1. urge2kill

    urge2kill Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2013
    Messages:
    448
    Likes Received:
    10
    Summary My chain seems to be coming off the crankset. How can I check for problems? I had an accident three days ago, and I might be able to attribute it to this problem. I've still got road rash and various other abrasions from the last accident. The Story Three days ago, I had my first serious brush against the street pavement in my two years of this. In a narrow construction zone, I was rushing up my gears for the cars stuck behind me, then I found myself hurled forward and sliding against the pavement. I couldn't remember what happened except that my feet came off the pedals. Today, I checked my bicycle before leaving for class. Everything looked fine, I just had to realign the handlebars with the wheel. When I started riding, the chain came off the crankset. I put the chain back on, and it came off again. I put it on again, and it remained there. I'm fairly certain that I put the chain back on all the way—I wasn't afraid to get my fingers greasy. Well, as I rode, I wondered whether this problem was the result or the cause of my accident. I went back home. Maintenance History In my 2+ years of riding, I never had good maintenance. For the last half a year, my derailleur/chain has been indecisive in certain gears, but I didn't care to do further H/L adjustments as long as my chain wasn't coming off the cogset. I've never had my chain come off the crankset before, though.
     
    Tags:


  2. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    Messages:
    2,264
    Likes Received:
    132
    1) time to check those H/L screws. Use Park tools walk through, or any of the numerous youtube tutorials.
    2) it is POSSIBLE to bend a chainring. Give the cranks a turn and watch for trueness.
     
  3. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Messages:
    11,945
    Likes Received:
    1,034
    "In my 2+ years of riding, I never had good maintenance."

    For your own safety it is time you did.

    Take your bike into a local shop, explain your crash story and ask them to go over the bike from one end to the other.
     
  4. vspa

    vspa Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2009
    Messages:
    2,203
    Likes Received:
    39
    it is a straight forward gear adjustment job, leave it to the bike shop
     
  5. urge2kill

    urge2kill Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2013
    Messages:
    448
    Likes Received:
    10
    Quote: Originally Posted by dabac .
    2) it is POSSIBLE to bend a chainring. Give the cranks a turn and watch for trueness.

    It didn't seem out of true, but I noticed that my derailleur was not vertical. The hanger was bent. I replaced it with the back-up hanger, and now it is vertical. Everything is shifting nicely.

    I also raised my seat. My seat-post sinks into the frame over time, and I start to lift myself off the saddle, especially when exerting effort. I think that's why I fell, for there is no reason a gear shift failure would cause me to fall if I were firmly planted on the saddle.

    By the way, I remember that I had to put the chain back on the chainring after the accident. First, I started jogging because I didn't want to put the chain back on. I was less than a mile from home. I decided to put the chain back on because I wanted to rinse out my wounds before they started to scab up. It was particularly annoying because my wrists were slightly sprained and left palm bleeding.
    Has anyone heard of a liquid bandage? It might be a good thing to carry around for immediate care. Maybe you can use it with neosporin to prevent infection, or maybe they have some disinfectant ones. I couldn't bandage because my biggest bandages still weren't big enough.
     
Loading...
Loading...