"Alas, poor Yoric, I knew him well..."

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Chris Zacho "Th, Jun 26, 2003.

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  1. Well, after 14 years (43,500 miles) of faithful service, my Schwinn Sierra frame finally failed me.
    The left rear dropout cracked in two. No accident, in fact, the frame is still in great shape, the
    dropout is just broken.

    I've already written Schwinn and asked if they'll honor a lifetime guarantee offered by another
    owner from another age. But I still wonder, Should I bother fixing it? Or should I upgrade?

    it's mainly a "Beast of Burden", Probably 80-90% of it's life has been commuting. But I do
    occasionally venture beyond the pavement. And, I must admit, the thought of having at least a rear
    disc brake in the pernicious clay of this region IS tempting.

    But is it worth the cost? Your opinions please.

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
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  2. Phil Brown

    Phil Brown Guest

    >Well, after 14 years (43,500 miles) of faithful service, my Schwinn Sierra frame finally failed me.
    >The left rear dropout cracked in two. No accident, in fact, the frame is still in great shape, the
    >dropout is just broken.

    This is an easy repair. Just find the local framebuilder. Like most of us he'll have done lots of
    dropouts. Shouldn't be too much. Repainting will cost more. Phil Brown
     
  3. Gary Smiley

    Gary Smiley Guest

    Well, if you're looking for an excuse to get a new bike, now's your chance. They make them so good
    these days. You know you want one. You're due. If you repair the Schwinn, you'll be stuck with it
    for a few more years.

    Chris Zacho The Wheelman wrote:

    > Well, after 14 years (43,500 miles) of faithful service, my Schwinn Sierra frame finally failed
    > me. The left rear dropout cracked in two. No accident, in fact, the frame is still in great shape,
    > the dropout is just broken.
    >
    > I've already written Schwinn and asked if they'll honor a lifetime guarantee offered by another
    > owner from another age. But I still wonder, Should I bother fixing it? Or should I upgrade?
    >
    > it's mainly a "Beast of Burden", Probably 80-90% of it's life has been commuting. But I do
    > occasionally venture beyond the pavement. And, I must admit, the thought of having at least a rear
    > disc brake in the pernicious clay of this region IS tempting.
    >
    > But is it worth the cost? Your opinions please.
    >
    > May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris
    >
    > Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  4. Sandy

    Sandy Guest

    Perhaps a nice chance to find out if the company will honor the warranty. If you get it repaired, I
    imagine they won't consider replacing it.

    And if they do decide to honor the warranty, and you end up with a reasonable replacement, you could
    write about it here, where it seems everyone prefers nasty stories about slacker manufacturers.

    And of course, if they don't do you right, then you have the honor of telling us about another
    typical nasty experience, and the whole gang will join in at the chorus.

    My own story - a new Kestrel that creaked horribly (BB). Manufacturer gave me a replacement
    instantly, but I had to go around the LBS, who insisted, "creaking in carbon fibre is normal".

    "Chris Zacho "The Wheelman"" <[email protected]> a √©crit dans le message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Well, after 14 years (43,500 miles) of faithful service, my Schwinn Sierra frame finally failed
    > me. The left rear dropout cracked in two. No accident, in fact, the frame is still in great shape,
    > the dropout is just broken.
    >
    > I've already written Schwinn and asked if they'll honor a lifetime guarantee offered by another
    > owner from another age. But I still wonder, Should I bother fixing it? Or should I upgrade?
    >
    > it's mainly a "Beast of Burden", Probably 80-90% of it's life has been commuting. But I do
    > occasionally venture beyond the pavement. And, I must admit, the thought of having at least a rear
    > disc brake in the pernicious clay of this region IS tempting.
    >
    > But is it worth the cost? Your opinions please.
    >
    > May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris
    >
    > Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  5. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

  6. In article <[email protected]>, Chris Zacho "The Wheelman"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Well, after 14 years (43,500 miles) of faithful service, my Schwinn Sierra frame finally failed me.
    >The left rear dropout cracked in two. No accident, in fact, the frame is still in great shape, the
    >dropout is just broken.
    >
    >I've already written Schwinn and asked if they'll honor a lifetime guarantee offered by another
    >owner from another age. But I still wonder, Should I bother fixing it? Or should I upgrade?

    Pretty easy fix, I'd do it if you can find someone to fix it for a reasonable fee. Sometimes just
    TIG welding the dropout back together is the best solution for an old junker, and you don't need a
    frame builder to do that for you.

    --Paul
     
  7. Vol

    Vol Guest

    Yes. After over 43 thousand miles of beating, it is worth the cost to get it fixed and either keep
    the Sierra and ride something newer or give it away to someone who will do a few more thousand.

    Opinions will vary, but the Sierra, IMHO, is not a bad bike, certainly too good a bike to hit the
    trash over a dropout failure.

    >But is it worth the cost? Your opinions please.
     
  8. Satisfied, John? ;-3)

    I'll let you know how Schwinn/Pacific Cycles responds. I should know by Saturday or Monday.

    I may just go with a somewhat better frame. We'll see.........................

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  9. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Chris Zacho "The Wheelman"" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Well, after 14 years (43,500 miles) of faithful service, my Schwinn Sierra frame finally failed
    > me. The left rear dropout cracked in two. No accident, in fact, the frame is still in great shape,
    > the dropout is just broken.
    >
    > I've already written Schwinn and asked if they'll honor a lifetime guarantee offered by another
    > owner from another age. But I still wonder, Should I bother fixing it? Or should I upgrade?
    >
    > it's mainly a "Beast of Burden", Probably 80-90% of it's life has been commuting. But I do
    > occasionally venture beyond the pavement. And, I must admit, the thought of having at least a rear
    > disc brake in the pernicious clay of this region IS tempting.
    >
    > But is it worth the cost? Your opinions please.

    A rear end replacement is trivially simple and cheap. Consult your local frame repair shop.
     
  10. dennisg

    dennisg New Member

    Joined:
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    Consider this: have the bike repaired AND get a new bike. As you said, the bike has provided thousands of miles of faithful service. There's still a lot of life left in it. So why not have it repair, then donate it to a Boys & Girls Club, or something like that. It's a great way to help underprivileged kids learn to appreciate cycling.
     
  11. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

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