Alcohol Staples

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Damsel in dis Dress, Dec 5, 2005.

  1. Okay, I know this has been covered, but I want to make sure I've got
    it straight. I'm looking for things that don't have to be used right
    away like wine, but can be used instead of wine in cooking.

    Dry vermouth for dry white wine?

    Port for dry red wine??

    We've got to get rum for the fruitcakes and a box of sweet white wine
    (yeah, yeah, yeah - we don't drink it fast enough for bottles, and we
    have highly uneducated tastebuds) for sipping at dinner. Might as
    well grab the wine substitutes while we're in there.

    Carol, who buys one can of beer when making drunk pinto beans <G>
    --

    http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/head_trollop/my_photos
     
    Tags:


  2. Doug Kanter

    Doug Kanter Guest

    "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Okay, I know this has been covered, but I want to make sure I've got
    > it straight. I'm looking for things that don't have to be used right
    > away like wine, but can be used instead of wine in cooking.
    >
    > Dry vermouth for dry white wine?
    >
    > Port for dry red wine??
    >
    > We've got to get rum for the fruitcakes and a box of sweet white wine
    > (yeah, yeah, yeah - we don't drink it fast enough for bottles, and we
    > have highly uneducated tastebuds) for sipping at dinner. Might as
    > well grab the wine substitutes while we're in there.
    >
    > Carol, who buys one can of beer when making drunk pinto beans <G>
    > --
    >
    > http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/head_trollop/my_photos


    Bourbon is good in marinades for beef & pork, as well as deglazing pans for
    meat sauces. Do not, under any circumstances, buy cheap bourbon.
     
  3. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Okay, I know this has been covered, but I want to make sure I've got
    > it straight. I'm looking for things that don't have to be used right
    > away like wine, but can be used instead of wine in cooking.
    >
    > Dry vermouth for dry white wine?


    Ok but a little spicy more herbs see below.


    >
    > Port for dry red wine??


    Nope - really too sweet IMHO.

    Maybe white port.

    Dimtiri


    vermouth
    [ver-MOOTH]
    White wine that has been fortified and flavored with various herbs and spices.
    The name "vermouth" comes from the German wermut ("WORMWOOD") which, before it
    was declared poisonous, was once the principal flavoring ingredient. There are
    several types of this wine, the most popular being white dry vermouth, commonly
    thought of as French (although it's made in other countries including the U.S.).
    It's drunk as an APÉRITIF and used in non-sweet COCKTAILS like the MARTINI.
    Sweet vermouth is reddish brown (colored with CARAMEL) and is also used as an
    apéritif as well as in slightly sweet cocktails such as the MANHATTAN. A third
    style - not as popular as the other two - is white and slightly sweet. It's
    called Bianco by Italians.
     
  4. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Doug Kanter wrote:
    > "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Okay, I know this has been covered, but I want to make sure I've got
    >>it straight. I'm looking for things that don't have to be used right
    >>away like wine, but can be used instead of wine in cooking.
    >>
    >>Dry vermouth for dry white wine?
    >>
    >>Port for dry red wine??
    >>
    >>We've got to get rum for the fruitcakes and a box of sweet white wine
    >>(yeah, yeah, yeah - we don't drink it fast enough for bottles, and we
    >>have highly uneducated tastebuds) for sipping at dinner. Might as
    >>well grab the wine substitutes while we're in there.
    >>
    >>Carol, who buys one can of beer when making drunk pinto beans <G>
    >>--
    >>
    >>http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/head_trollop/my_photos

    >
    >
    > Bourbon is good in marinades for beef & pork, as well as deglazing pans for
    > meat sauces. Do not, under any circumstances, buy cheap bourbon.
    >
    >



    Some of the blended Canadian whiskeys ought to be OK to substitute for
    bourbon in cooking. Decent Canadian whiskey is a lot cheaper than
    decent bourbon.

    Bob
     
  5. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
    > Port for dry red wine??
    >

    Port is sweet, not dry. Red wines keep forever as long as you have them
    properly corked and stored in a cool place, which, given where you live
    probably wouldn't be difficult! <G>

    White wine also keeps (just store the bottle in the fridge), although
    vermouth is nice to have on hand as well.

    Thanks for reminding me I have a bottle of tawny port in the pantry. I'm
    thinking of making pot roast and port is a nice addition when making gravy
    :)

    Jill
     
  6. Doug Kanter

    Doug Kanter Guest

    "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Doug Kanter wrote:
    >> "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>>Okay, I know this has been covered, but I want to make sure I've got
    >>>it straight. I'm looking for things that don't have to be used right
    >>>away like wine, but can be used instead of wine in cooking.
    >>>
    >>>Dry vermouth for dry white wine?
    >>>
    >>>Port for dry red wine??
    >>>
    >>>We've got to get rum for the fruitcakes and a box of sweet white wine
    >>>(yeah, yeah, yeah - we don't drink it fast enough for bottles, and we
    >>>have highly uneducated tastebuds) for sipping at dinner. Might as
    >>>well grab the wine substitutes while we're in there.
    >>>
    >>>Carol, who buys one can of beer when making drunk pinto beans <G>
    >>>--
    >>>
    >>>http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/head_trollop/my_photos

    >>
    >>
    >> Bourbon is good in marinades for beef & pork, as well as deglazing pans
    >> for meat sauces. Do not, under any circumstances, buy cheap bourbon.

    >
    >
    > Some of the blended Canadian whiskeys ought to be OK to substitute for
    > bourbon in cooking. Decent Canadian whiskey is a lot cheaper than decent
    > bourbon.
    >
    > Bob


    Maybe, but there's something odd about those Canadians. Are you sure you
    want to buy things from that country? Such great scenery & fishing, but they
    located the country in such a stupid place that so friggin' cold. What were
    they thinking?
     
  7. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Doug Kanter wrote:
    > "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Doug Kanter wrote:
    >>
    >>>"Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>news:[email protected]
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Okay, I know this has been covered, but I want to make sure I've got
    >>>>it straight. I'm looking for things that don't have to be used right
    >>>>away like wine, but can be used instead of wine in cooking.
    >>>>
    >>>>Dry vermouth for dry white wine?
    >>>>
    >>>>Port for dry red wine??
    >>>>
    >>>>We've got to get rum for the fruitcakes and a box of sweet white wine
    >>>>(yeah, yeah, yeah - we don't drink it fast enough for bottles, and we
    >>>>have highly uneducated tastebuds) for sipping at dinner. Might as
    >>>>well grab the wine substitutes while we're in there.
    >>>>
    >>>>Carol, who buys one can of beer when making drunk pinto beans <G>
    >>>>--
    >>>>
    >>>>http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/head_trollop/my_photos
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Bourbon is good in marinades for beef & pork, as well as deglazing pans
    >>>for meat sauces. Do not, under any circumstances, buy cheap bourbon.

    >>
    >>
    >>Some of the blended Canadian whiskeys ought to be OK to substitute for
    >>bourbon in cooking. Decent Canadian whiskey is a lot cheaper than decent
    >>bourbon.
    >>
    >>Bob

    >
    >
    > Maybe, but there's something odd about those Canadians. Are you sure you
    > want to buy things from that country? Such great scenery & fishing, but they
    > located the country in such a stupid place that so friggin' cold. What were
    > they thinking?
    >
    >


    It's colder here than in some parts of Canada, and I'm farther north
    than Toronto. (What was I thinking?)

    Bob
     
  8. Hexe

    Hexe Guest

    On Mon, 05 Dec 2005 11:05:29 -0600, Damsel in dis Dress
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Okay, I know this has been covered, but I want to make sure I've got
    >it straight. I'm looking for things that don't have to be used right
    >away like wine, but can be used instead of wine in cooking.
    >


    Don't know how readily available it is where you are, but it is the
    season, so you might be able to find Glühwein - either red (traditional
    or white).

    I wanted a marinade some pork awhile back and wanted to use up some of
    the opened bottles. The Glühwein reached out for me as I walked by --
    why not? It gave a quite interesting flavor to the pork; I think I only
    added onion, garlic and oil so as not to buy the spices in the wine.

    It also comes in handy if it is cold. While you are preparing the meal
    heat some up to keep you warm until the foods ready.

    Capt. Morgan's Spiced Rum also works with pork.

    Marsala makes a good quick sauce when needed.
    --
    :Hexe
    : Thought for the journey:
    It's not enough to be able to pick up a sword. You have to know which end to poke into the enemy. -- (Terry Pratchett, Lords and Ladies)
     
  9. LT

    LT Guest


    > Some of the blended Canadian whiskeys ought to be OK to substitute for
    > bourbon in cooking. Decent Canadian whiskey is a lot cheaper than
    > decent bourbon.
    >

    My fav is brandy or cognac. Even inexpensive (under $20) brandy like
    Christian Brothers, is great for sauces etc. and it keeps forever

    In cooking, most if not all of the alcohol gets burned out. But I like
    adding a bit right at the end so some alcohol is present for extra warmth in
    the mouth!

    Larry T
     
  10. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    LT wrote:
    >>Some of the blended Canadian whiskeys ought to be OK to substitute for
    >>bourbon in cooking. Decent Canadian whiskey is a lot cheaper than
    >>decent bourbon.
    >>

    >
    > My fav is brandy or cognac. Even inexpensive (under $20) brandy like
    > Christian Brothers, is great for sauces etc. and it keeps forever
    >
    > In cooking, most if not all of the alcohol gets burned out. But I like
    > adding a bit right at the end so some alcohol is present for extra warmth in
    > the mouth!
    >
    > Larry T
    >
    >


    If you deglase a pan with alcohol, most of it probably does boil off.
    But if you add alcohol to a soup or sauce or something that contains
    water, you would be surprised how much of the alcohol remains after cooking.

    Best regards,
    Bob
     
  11. Default User

    Default User Guest

    jmcquown wrote:


    > White wine also keeps (just store the bottle in the fridge), although
    > vermouth is nice to have on hand as well.



    As I don't drink wine, I buy the wine that comes in the small bottles,
    in four packs. I store opened ones in the refrigerator.


    Brian

    --
    If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
    won't shut up.
    -- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)
     
  12. On Mon, 05 Dec 2005 17:55:32 GMT, in rec.food.cooking, "Doug Kanter"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >"zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> Doug Kanter wrote:
    >>> "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]
    >>>
    >>>>Okay, I know this has been covered, but I want to make sure I've got
    >>>>it straight. I'm looking for things that don't have to be used right
    >>>>away like wine, but can be used instead of wine in cooking.
    >>>>
    >>>>Dry vermouth for dry white wine?
    >>>>
    >>>>Port for dry red wine??
    >>>>
    >>>>We've got to get rum for the fruitcakes and a box of sweet white wine
    >>>>(yeah, yeah, yeah - we don't drink it fast enough for bottles, and we
    >>>>have highly uneducated tastebuds) for sipping at dinner. Might as
    >>>>well grab the wine substitutes while we're in there.
    >>>>
    >>>>Carol, who buys one can of beer when making drunk pinto beans <G>
    >>>>--
    >>>>
    >>>>http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/head_trollop/my_photos
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Bourbon is good in marinades for beef & pork, as well as deglazing pans
    >>> for meat sauces. Do not, under any circumstances, buy cheap bourbon.

    >>
    >>
    >> Some of the blended Canadian whiskeys ought to be OK to substitute for
    >> bourbon in cooking. Decent Canadian whiskey is a lot cheaper than decent
    >> bourbon.
    >>
    >> Bob

    >
    >Maybe, but there's something odd about those Canadians. Are you sure you
    >want to buy things from that country? Such great scenery & fishing, but they
    >located the country in such a stupid place that so friggin' cold. What were
    >they thinking?
    >


    What, it doesn't get cold in much of the United States? What are
    *you* thinking?
     
  13. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "LT" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >> Some of the blended Canadian whiskeys ought to be OK to substitute for
    >> bourbon in cooking. Decent Canadian whiskey is a lot cheaper than
    >> decent bourbon.
    >>

    > My fav is brandy or cognac. Even inexpensive (under $20) brandy like
    > Christian Brothers, is great for sauces etc. and it keeps forever
    >
    > In cooking, most if not all of the alcohol gets burned out. But I like
    > adding a bit right at the end so some alcohol is present for extra warmth in
    > the mouth!
    >
    > Larry T


    Try Korbel brandy. IMHO its nicer than CB.

    Dimitri
     
  14. LT

    LT Guest


    > If you deglase a pan with alcohol, most of it probably does boil off.
    > But if you add alcohol to a soup or sauce or something that contains
    > water, you would be surprised how much of the alcohol remains after

    cooking.
    >
    > Best regards,
    > Bob


    You are probably correct. I have never messured this (not having a way to do
    it) but my gut feeling is that the longer the sauce simmers, the less "A"
    there will be. We usually add some brandy to things like pot roast that cook
    slow and long, and then spike it a bit just before serving. No ones ever
    staggered from the table ;-)

    Larry T
     
  15. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    LT wrote:

    >
    > You are probably correct. I have never messured this (not having a way to do
    > it) but my gut feeling is that the longer the sauce simmers, the less "A"
    > there will be. We usually add some brandy to things like pot roast that cook
    > slow and long, and then spike it a bit just before serving. No ones ever
    > staggered from the table ;-)


    A friend of mine had a sister and brother in law who were teetotallers. His wife
    served them a nice dinner one night and the brother in law had seconds and raved
    about how good it was. He flipped out when he found out there was wine it.
     
  16. In article <[email protected]>,
    Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Okay, I know this has been covered, but I want to make sure I've got
    > it straight. I'm looking for things that don't have to be used right
    > away like wine, but can be used instead of wine in cooking.
    >
    > Dry vermouth for dry white wine?
    >
    > Port for dry red wine??
    >
    > We've got to get rum for the fruitcakes and a box of sweet white wine
    > (yeah, yeah, yeah - we don't drink it fast enough for bottles, and we
    > have highly uneducated tastebuds) for sipping at dinner. Might as
    > well grab the wine substitutes while we're in there.
    >
    > Carol, who buys one can of beer when making drunk pinto beans <G>


    I use dry vermouth or dry sherry for white; port is sweet - any I've
    ever had, anyway. Dunno what you'd do for dry red. Maybe a small
    bottle for a premium price (liquor store near here has
    airplane-service-size bottles -- prolly bought them from NWA, too)
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 12-4-05, Skyline Aglow
     
  17. The Joneses

    The Joneses Guest

    jmcquown wrote:

    > Damsel in dis Dress wrote:
    > > Port for dry red wine??
    > >

    > Port is sweet ...Thanks for reminding me I have a bottle of tawny port in
    > the pantry. I'm thinking of making pot roast and port is a nice addition
    > when making gravy :)
    > Jill


    Y'all give me such good ideas. I have a bottle of dry marsala, for which I use
    a vacuum gadget to seal it after every use. I keep it in the cabinet and a
    splash makes a nice addition to poultry and light colored sauces.
    Edrena
     
  18. A.C.

    A.C. Guest

    Damsel in dis Dress wrote:

    > Okay, I know this has been covered, but I want to make sure I've got
    > it straight. I'm looking for things that don't have to be used right
    > away like wine, but can be used instead of wine in cooking.
    >


    dams, if you want to use wine, you could always get a small box of decent red
    wine. it will keep for a long time and doesn't suffer any of the oxidation
    problems that an open bottle of wine does.
     
  19. A.C.

    A.C. Guest

    Damsel in dis Dress wrote:

    > Okay, I know this has been covered, but I want to make sure I've got
    > it straight. I'm looking for things that don't have to be used right
    > away like wine, but can be used instead of wine in cooking.
    >


    dams, if you want to use wine, you could always get a small box of decent red
    wine. it will keep for a long time and doesn't suffer any of the oxidation
    problems that an open bottle of wine does.
     
  20. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Okay, I know this has been covered, but I want to make sure I've got
    >> it straight. I'm looking for things that don't have to be used right
    >> away like wine, but can be used instead of wine in cooking.
    >>
    >> Dry vermouth for dry white wine?
    >>
    >> Port for dry red wine??
    >>
    >> We've got to get rum for the fruitcakes and a box of sweet white wine
    >> (yeah, yeah, yeah - we don't drink it fast enough for bottles, and we
    >> have highly uneducated tastebuds) for sipping at dinner. Might as
    >> well grab the wine substitutes while we're in there.
    >>
    >> Carol, who buys one can of beer when making drunk pinto beans <G>

    >
    > I use dry vermouth or dry sherry for white; port is sweet - any I've
    > ever had, anyway. Dunno what you'd do for dry red. Maybe a small
    > bottle for a premium price (liquor store near here has
    > airplane-service-size bottles -- prolly bought them from NWA, too)


    For dry red, red wine vinegar (then cut anything else in the recipe that
    might be vinegary, salty or tart). But dry red keeps just fine as long as
    it is sealed and stored away from light.

    Jill
     
Loading...