Alloy quill shaft bolts?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Pete Biggs, Jun 24, 2004.

  1. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    I use a Protec Ahead converter in order to use an ahead stem on my
    threaded forks. It's absolutely fine except I think the shaft bolt is
    interefering with my compass. These bolts tend to be big lumps of steel
    and get magnetised too! ...My what? Yes, I've mounted a mini compass* to
    my top tube (best place for it but still not right).

    Does anyone know of a converter that comes with an alloy (aluminium) bolt,
    or of an alloy bolt that might fit? Preferebaly for less than 20 quid
    total expendature. Any inexpensive quill stems with alloy shaft bolts
    (that I could nick the bolt from)? Or perhaps you have a spare bolt? I
    don't mind risking it if no guarantee of fit (would sell on).

    Note: SJSC no longer stock Cinelli alloy bolts (I tried to order one).

    * Gelert Watch Strap compass from eBay (sold regularly there): cheap,
    small, light and neat. I have another one on another bike that points to
    the correct direction -- perhaps because it has a threadless headset and
    Ti frame.

    ~PB p[at]biggs[dot]tc
     
    Tags:


  2. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 24/6/04 1:05 pm, in article [email protected], "Pete Biggs"
    <ppear{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote:

    > It's absolutely fine except I think the shaft bolt is
    > interefering with my compass. These bolts tend to be big lumps of steel
    > and get magnetised too! ...My what? Yes, I've mounted a mini compass* to
    > my top tube (best place for it but still not right).


    That's the problem with new fangled technology. Just use the time and the
    angle of the sun to estimate your direction. Works fine here in Sunny Dundee
    (1)

    ...d

    [1] Driest city in UK and second sunniest last year.. or so I was told.
     
  3. Roos Eisma

    Roos Eisma Guest

    David Martin <[email protected]> writes:

    >[1] Driest city in UK and second sunniest last year.. or so I was told.



    Currently going for 'dreichest' instead....

    Roos
     
  4. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 24/6/04 1:59 pm, in article [email protected],
    "Roos Eisma" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Currently going for 'dreichest' instead....


    To translate for the southerners, dreich is an onomatopoeic word meaning a
    depressingly drizzly sort of day that isn't really raining enough to call it
    rain but is damp enough to not be dry and is grey and miserable.
    It's not so much a word as an emotion.

    ...d
     
  5. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <BD009780.18D6B%[email protected]>, David Martin
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > On 24/6/04 1:59 pm, in article
    > [email protected], "Roos Eisma"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Currently going for 'dreichest' instead....

    >
    > To translate for the southerners, dreich is an onomatopoeic word
    > meaning a depressingly drizzly sort of day that isn't really raining
    > enough to call it rain but is damp enough to not be dry and is grey
    > and miserable.


    Ye hae it aa wrang, my mannie. Gin there's a wee bit watter on the wind,
    there's a wee bit watter on the wind; nae mair's thon. 'Dreich' disnae
    hae tae be wet. Dreich is dreich. They southrons micht caa it
    'depressing'.

    > It's not so much a word as an emotion.


    Ae, aeblins; ye hae the richt o it there. And wisnae Dundee ae the
    dreichest airt?

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    Anagram: I'm soon broke.
     
  6. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote in news:cr8tq1-m3c.ln1
    @gododdin.internal.jasmine.org.uk:

    > Ye hae it aa wrang, my mannie. Gin there's a wee bit watter on the wind,
    > there's a wee bit watter on the wind; nae mair's thon. 'Dreich' disnae
    > hae tae be wet. Dreich is dreich. They southrons micht caa it
    > 'depressing'.
    >


    And I thought you were a sassenach! Dundonian can be a bit inpenetrable for
    many Scots - "Ah'll hae a pae n in ingin in in aa" means little to most
    people :)


    Graeme
     
  7. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 25/6/04 11:17 am, in article
    [email protected], "Graeme"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote in news:cr8tq1-m3c.ln1
    > @gododdin.internal.jasmine.org.uk:
    >
    >> Ye hae it aa wrang, my mannie. Gin there's a wee bit watter on the wind,
    >> there's a wee bit watter on the wind; nae mair's thon. 'Dreich' disnae
    >> hae tae be wet. Dreich is dreich. They southrons micht caa it
    >> 'depressing'.


    > And I thought you were a sassenach! Dundonian can be a bit inpenetrable for
    > many Scots - "Ah'll hae a pae n in ingin in in aa" means little to most
    > people :)


    I'm gradually being taught the language by my kids school friends. But
    anything to do with food is not a problem ;-)

    ...d
     
  8. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    David Martin wrote:
    >
    > I'm gradually being taught the language by my kids school friends. But
    > anything to do with food is not a problem ;-)
    >


    A Scottish friend's kids were referred by their school in the USA to a speech
    correctionist to sort out their speech impediment aka a Scottish accent.

    Tony
     
  9. Aloysius

    Aloysius Guest

    "Pete Biggs" <ppear{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I use a Protec Ahead converter in order to use an ahead stem on my
    > threaded forks. It's absolutely fine except I think the shaft bolt is
    > interefering with my compass.


    You need to swing your bike and compass to measure the deviation
    between real and measured heading. You then need to calculate the
    positioning of the balls and the length if Flinders Bar to minimise
    the error. Following installation of the balls and bar, a further
    swing of the compass is needed to produce a correction card which
    should be sited near the compass display.

    Simple really.


    Kind regards,
    Al.
     
  10. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    "Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > A Scottish friend's kids were referred by their school in the USA to a
    > speech correctionist to sort out their speech impediment aka a
    > Scottish accent.


    Reminds me of one of the articles read out on The News Quiz a year or so
    ago. It told of a man in America who was released from psychiatric care
    when it was discovered that he was not depressed, only Scottish.

    Rev. I.M. Jolly perhaps? :)


    Graeme
     
  11. Alan Edgey

    Alan Edgey Guest

    David Martin <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<BD009780.18D6B%[email protected]>...
    > On 24/6/04 1:59 pm, in article [email protected],
    > "Roos Eisma" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Currently going for 'dreichest' instead....

    >
    > To translate for the southerners, dreich is an onomatopoeic word


    No it isn't it has a long perdigree and is cognate with Swedish drjugr
    and no doubt similar cognates in other related languages.

    > meaning a
    > depressingly drizzly sort of day that isn't really raining enough to call it
    > rain but is damp enough to not be dry and is grey and miserable.
    > It's not so much a word as an emotion.
    >
    > ..d


    Alan
     
  12. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Alan Edgey
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > David Martin <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<BD009780.18D6B%[email protected]>...
    >> On 24/6/04 1:59 pm, in article
    >> [email protected], "Roos Eisma"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> > Currently going for 'dreichest' instead....

    >>
    >> To translate for the southerners, dreich is an onomatopoeic word

    >
    > No it isn't it has a long perdigree and is cognate with Swedish drjugr
    > and no doubt similar cognates in other related languages.


    'drear' in English, which means much the same?

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    .::;===r==\
    / /___||___\____
    //==\- ||- | /__\( MS Windows IS an operating environment.
    //____\__||___|_// \|: C++ IS an object oriented programming language.
    \__/ ~~~~~~~~~ \__/ Citroen 2cv6 IS a four door family saloon.
     
  13. Dr Curious

    Dr Curious Guest

    "Aloysius" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    > "Pete Biggs" <ppear{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message

    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I use a Protec Ahead converter in order to use an ahead stem on my
    > > threaded forks. It's absolutely fine except I think the shaft bolt is
    > > interefering with my compass.

    >
    > You need to swing your bike and compass to measure the deviation
    > between real and measured heading. You then need to calculate the
    > positioning of the balls and the length if Flinders Bar to minimise
    > the error. Following installation of the balls and bar, a further
    > swing of the compass is needed to produce a correction card which
    > should be sited near the compass display.
    >
    > Simple really.
    >
    >
    > Kind regards,
    > Al.




    It would be nice to think that like steel framed ships, a steel framed
    bike's magnetic field would be determined by the direction it was
    facing when it was being built. Except it isn't, as brazing unlike
    hammering, doesn't really count.


    Curious
     
  14. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    On Fri, 25 Jun 2004 20:48:52 +0100, "Dr Curious"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >It would be nice to think that like steel framed ships, a steel framed
    >bike's magnetic field would be determined by the direction it was
    >facing when it was being built. Except it isn't, as brazing unlike
    >hammering, doesn't really count.


    Speaking of ships, Lord Kelvin invented a binnacle that incorporated
    corrector magnets and iron spheres to counteract the effects of the
    ship's iron. Pete could try mounting his compass in one of those.

    --
    Dave...

    Get a bicycle. You will not regret it. If you live. - Mark Twain
     
  15. Gawnsoft

    Gawnsoft Guest

    On Fri, 25 Jun 2004 22:36:47 GMT, Dave Kahn <[email protected]>
    wrote (more or less):

    >On Fri, 25 Jun 2004 20:48:52 +0100, "Dr Curious"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>It would be nice to think that like steel framed ships, a steel framed
    >>bike's magnetic field would be determined by the direction it was
    >>facing when it was being built. Except it isn't, as brazing unlike
    >>hammering, doesn't really count.

    >
    >Speaking of ships, Lord Kelvin invented a binnacle that incorporated
    >corrector magnets and iron spheres to counteract the effects of the
    >ship's iron. Pete could try mounting his compass in one of those.


    'invented /the/ binnacle, which...' </pedant>



    --
    Cheers,
    Euan
    Gawnsoft: http://www.gawnsoft.co.sr
    Symbian/Epoc wiki: http://html.dnsalias.net:1122
    Smalltalk links (harvested from comp.lang.smalltalk) http://html.dnsalias.net/gawnsoft/smalltalk
     
  16. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Gawnsoft
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > On Fri, 25 Jun 2004 22:36:47 GMT, Dave Kahn <[email protected]>
    > wrote (more or less):
    >
    >>On Fri, 25 Jun 2004 20:48:52 +0100, "Dr Curious"
    >><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>It would be nice to think that like steel framed ships, a steel
    >>>framed
    >>>bike's magnetic field would be determined by the direction it was
    >>>facing when it was being built. Except it isn't, as brazing unlike
    >>>hammering, doesn't really count.

    >>
    >>Speaking of ships, Lord Kelvin invented a binnacle that incorporated
    >>corrector magnets and iron spheres to counteract the effects of the
    >>ship's iron. Pete could try mounting his compass in one of those.

    >
    > 'invented /the/ binnacle, which...' </pedant>


    No, _a_ binnacle. There had been binnacles for hundreds of years before
    then, which served the important purpose of shielding the pilot light
    (which illuminated the compass, enabling you to pilot the ship, hence
    its name) from the wind. What made Kelvin's binnacle different from
    previous binnacles was that it _also_ incorporated magnetic correction.

    I do hate pedants who are just _wrong_.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    Windows 95:
    You, you, you! You make a grown man cry...
    M. Jagger/K. Richards
     
  17. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    >
    > I do hate pedants who are just _wrong_.


    What about those who are more than just wrong?

    Tony ;-)
     
  18. Gawnsoft

    Gawnsoft Guest

    On Sat, 26 Jun 2004 09:35:02 GMT, Simon Brooke <[email protected]>
    wrote (more or less):

    >in message <[email protected]>, Gawnsoft
    >('[email protected]') wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 25 Jun 2004 22:36:47 GMT, Dave Kahn <[email protected]>
    >> wrote (more or less):
    >>
    >>>On Fri, 25 Jun 2004 20:48:52 +0100, "Dr Curious"
    >>><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>It would be nice to think that like steel framed ships, a steel
    >>>>framed
    >>>>bike's magnetic field would be determined by the direction it was
    >>>>facing when it was being built. Except it isn't, as brazing unlike
    >>>>hammering, doesn't really count.
    >>>
    >>>Speaking of ships, Lord Kelvin invented a binnacle that incorporated
    >>>corrector magnets and iron spheres to counteract the effects of the
    >>>ship's iron. Pete could try mounting his compass in one of those.

    >>
    >> 'invented /the/ binnacle, which...' </pedant>

    >
    >No, _a_ binnacle. There had been binnacles for hundreds of years before
    >then, which served the important purpose of shielding the pilot light
    >(which illuminated the compass, enabling you to pilot the ship, hence
    >its name) from the wind. What made Kelvin's binnacle different from
    >previous binnacles was that it _also_ incorporated magnetic correction.
    >
    >I do hate pedants who are just _wrong_.


    Kelven invented '/the/ binnacle which' compensated for the effect of
    the ships metal hull.

    No other binnacle has done that sort of compensation before.

    His was not one of many competing designs.


    --
    Cheers,
    Euan
    Gawnsoft: http://www.gawnsoft.co.sr
    Symbian/Epoc wiki: http://html.dnsalias.net:1122
    Smalltalk links (harvested from comp.lang.smalltalk) http://html.dnsalias.net/gawnsoft/smalltalk
     
  19. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Gawnsoft wrote:
    >
    > Kelven invented '/the/ binnacle which' compensated for the effect of
    > the ships metal hull.
    >
    > No other binnacle has done that sort of compensation before.
    >
    > His was not one of many competing designs.


    I go with "a binnacle". Its "Kelvin invented a (type of) binnacle which...."
    or "Kelvin invented the magnetically compensated binnacle" You can only use
    the definite article with the specific binnacle he invented whereas you should
    use the indefinite article in the former because the binnacle is not a
    specific binnacle and has to be qualified by the clause which defines what
    type of binnacle it is he invented.

    uk.rec.cycling.grammar anyone?

    Tony
     
  20. On Sat, 26 Jun 2004 13:28:08 +0100, "Tony Raven"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    <[email protected]>:

    >I go with "a binnacle". Its "Kelvin invented a (type of) binnacle which...."
    >or "Kelvin invented the magnetically compensated binnacle"


    "It's only me from over the sea" said Binnacle Bill the sailor...

    IGMC

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
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