Alternative medicine

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by C.Health, Sep 19, 2005.

  1. C.Health

    C.Health Guest

    http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/magazine/daily/12442205.htm

    A Harvard study released in January found that 35 percent of Americans had
    used some form of alternative healing. The National Center for Complementary
    and Alternative Medicine, part of the National Institutes of Health, found
    that more Americans were using yoga, meditation, herbs, special diets and
    other methods.

    If the number who believe in the healing power of prayer is added, the study
    shows, close to two-thirds of Americans have sought something other than
    doctors and medicine to treat physical ills.

    "People are not happy with Western medical treatment and are seeking
    alternatives," said Babette Galang, complementary health officer ....."
     
    Tags:


  2. Robert

    Robert Guest

    "C.Health" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:KMDXe.9327$%[email protected]
    > http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/magazine/daily/12442205.htm
    >
    > A Harvard study released in January found that 35 percent of Americans had
    > used some form of alternative healing. The National Center for

    Complementary
    > and Alternative Medicine, part of the National Institutes of Health, found
    > that more Americans were using yoga, meditation, herbs, special diets and
    > other methods.


    I don't see that as alternative health. Is exercise alternative health?
    Is diet alternative health?
    It's ones own personal responsibility to maintain and keep one's health by
    any means necessary.

    >
    > If the number who believe in the healing power of prayer is added, the

    study
    > shows, close to two-thirds of Americans have sought something other than
    > doctors and medicine to treat physical ills.


    I don't see that as exclusionary. One prays before surgery, the patient and
    the surgeon. All of a sudden prayer is considered alternative health?

    >
    > "People are not happy with Western medical treatment and are seeking
    > alternatives," said Babette Galang, complementary health officer ....."
    >
    >


    Some of that unhappiness has been touched on by others.
    If you weight 600 lbs and come into the emergency room with health problems
    and expect the doctors to work magic on you then you would be unhappy also.
    You shouldn't see your doctor with a simple cold. Some people are unhappy
    that nothing is done or treatments with meds are not dispensed. That is
    seldom a problem with alternative health where there is always one
    supplement or another they can sell.
    If a doctor were to practice "alternative" medicine and give out herbs only
    then you would see an uproar by people expecting more stronger conventional
    medicine.
    Insurance companies have learned that conventional medicine is expensive and
    to have cheap alternatives are a good thing.
    I agree with that. Alternative are good but you are talking about apples and
    oranges. Don't expect doctors to practice "alternative" and don't expect
    alternatives to practice "conventional " medicine.
     
  3. Peter Moran

    Peter Moran Guest

    "C.Health" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:KMDXe.9327$%[email protected]
    > http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/magazine/daily/12442205.htm
    >
    > A Harvard study released in January found that 35 percent of Americans had
    > used some form of alternative healing. The National Center for
    > Complementary
    > and Alternative Medicine, part of the National Institutes of Health, found
    > that more Americans were using yoga, meditation, herbs, special diets and
    > other methods.
    >
    > If the number who believe in the healing power of prayer is added, the
    > study
    > shows, close to two-thirds of Americans have sought something other than
    > doctors and medicine to treat physical ills.
    >
    > "People are not happy with Western medical treatment and are seeking
    > alternatives," said Babette Galang, complementary health officer ....."


    That is not true, and not even made more true by such statistics. Very few
    people use "alternatives" as a true alternative to mainstream care. All
    except a few per cent use it as an add-on to normal medicine, or for
    specific complaints only. All studies show that.

    The latter may be serious illnesses for which medicine has no good answers
    yet, in which case they are usually used out of desperation and acute need,
    rather than any confidence that the alternatives have worth.

    And those using yoga and meditation may think that these things may make
    them feel and function better in some ways, but without really thinking of
    them as medical treatments. They will still see doctors when they are
    sick.

    Most using alternatives have never really thought about the scientific
    divides that dominate discussion here. They are of no importance to them
    in the myriads of day-to-day contexts within which a remedy may be sought
    for some complaint or other. They thus will try out almost any remedy on
    almost any level of recommendation, and will end up having no true idea as
    to whether they have any intrinsic biomedical activity or not, when studies
    show that sham treatments can appear to "work" 50% or more of the time.

    The fact is that after some thirty years of intense interest and
    investigation of "alternatives", it is difficult to think of any important
    contribution they, or any "alternative" concepts, have made to medical
    care.

    Peter Moran


    >
    >
     
  4. Robert

    Robert Guest

    "Peter Moran" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]-reader-03.brisbane.pipenetworks.com.au...
    >
    > "C.Health" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:KMDXe.9327$%[email protected]
    > > http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/magazine/daily/12442205.htm
    > >
    > > A Harvard study released in January found that 35 percent of Americans

    had
    > > used some form of alternative healing. The National Center for
    > > Complementary
    > > and Alternative Medicine, part of the National Institutes of Health,

    found
    > > that more Americans were using yoga, meditation, herbs, special diets

    and
    > > other methods.
    > >
    > > If the number who believe in the healing power of prayer is added, the
    > > study
    > > shows, close to two-thirds of Americans have sought something other than
    > > doctors and medicine to treat physical ills.
    > >
    > > "People are not happy with Western medical treatment and are seeking
    > > alternatives," said Babette Galang, complementary health officer ....."

    >
    > That is not true, and not even made more true by such statistics. Very

    few
    > people use "alternatives" as a true alternative to mainstream care.


    That is not what they are saying. They are not saying that they use
    alternatives TO mainstream care but increasing the use of the term
    alternative and is used IN conjuction with mainstream care.
    There are a lot of insurance carriers allowing chiropractors and massage
    services to be included in coverage.
    There are biofeed back mechanism being used in chemotherapy for example so
    it is not exclusive use but in conjuction with.

    All
    > except a few per cent use it as an add-on to normal medicine, or for
    > specific complaints only. All studies show that.
    >
    > The latter may be serious illnesses for which medicine has no good

    answers
    > yet, in which case they are usually used out of desperation and acute

    need,
    > rather than any confidence that the alternatives have worth.
    >
    > And those using yoga and meditation may think that these things may make
    > them feel and function better in some ways, but without really thinking of
    > them as medical treatments. They will still see doctors when they are
    > sick.
    >
    > Most using alternatives have never really thought about the scientific
    > divides that dominate discussion here. They are of no importance to

    them
    > in the myriads of day-to-day contexts within which a remedy may be sought
    > for some complaint or other. They thus will try out almost any remedy on
    > almost any level of recommendation, and will end up having no true idea as
    > to whether they have any intrinsic biomedical activity or not, when

    studies
    > show that sham treatments can appear to "work" 50% or more of the time.
    >
    > The fact is that after some thirty years of intense interest and
    > investigation of "alternatives", it is difficult to think of any important
    > contribution they, or any "alternative" concepts, have made to medical
    > care.
    >
    > Peter Moran


    Have to disagree with you there.
    IT is very much a cultural thing and alternatives can provide fill in
    measures when conventional medicine is lacking.
    I would not call that as insignificant.
    There are many spheres of influence on a persons health status.
    There are psychosocial aspects that modern medicine can not deal with. Those
    are difficult issues such as support systems that impact on health.
    It's important but sort of like the high divorce rate that nobody can do
    anything about. It's there but difficult to deal with.
     
  5. "A Harvard study released in January found that 35 percent of Americans
    had used some form of alternative healing. The National Center for
    Complementary and Alternative Medicine, part of the National Institutes of
    Health, found that more Americans were using yoga, meditation, herbs,
    special diets and other methods."


    It should be noted that the above is a bit misleading, it can not be
    claimed that "healing" was achieved, only that some people partook of
    practices that claim to do same. Even as part of nih, a political outcome
    and not a scientific driven action, cam has had little of which to claim
    success. The best results are perhaps in the area of nutrition, which by
    definition makes it in many cases standard science and nothing alternative
    about it at all.
     
  6. JohnDoe

    JohnDoe Guest

    C.Health wrote:

    > http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/magazine/daily/12442205.htm
    >
    > A Harvard study released in January found that 35 percent of Americans had
    > used some form of alternative healing. The National Center for Complementary
    > and Alternative Medicine, part of the National Institutes of Health, found
    > that more Americans were using yoga, meditation, herbs, special diets and
    > other methods.
    >
    > If the number who believe in the healing power of prayer is added, the study
    > shows, close to two-thirds of Americans have sought something other than
    > doctors and medicine to treat physical ills.
    >
    > "People are not happy with Western medical treatment and are seeking
    > alternatives," said Babette Galang, complementary health officer ....."


    It is my experience that many people don't know or remember how things
    were before scientific medicine took over. They've never seen people die
    from 'simple' infections. They don't know that there was a time when the
    diagnosis cancer was an absolute deathsentence. They don't realize that
    many things that are trivial now were totally untreatable and even
    lethal in the days that we only had what is now called 'alternative
    medicine'. They have never seen with their own eyes that when it comes
    down to it, 'alternative medicine' is utterly powerless. However, if you
    look to less developed countries, things are quit different. Whenever
    there is an outbreak of some disease there, I have never heard people
    asking for homeopahts, naturopaths, acupuncturists etc. They all want
    the real thing, and that is scientific medicine. Maybe we should
    pronmote alt-med for a while and see how quick people wake up and smell
    the coffee.
     
  7. Lacustral

    Lacustral Guest

    C.Health ([email protected]) wrote:

    >"People are not happy with Western medical treatment and are seeking
    >alternatives," said Babette Galang, complementary health officer ....."


    I solved a lot of health problems with elimination diet/food challenges,
    that mainstream medicine had never done anything for.

    Food intolerance isn't all that "alternative" - it was a conventional
    allergist who got me started on doing the elimination diet etc. But
    no mainstream type, even allergists, ever suggested that my various
    health problems might be from food intolerance.

    A naturopath might have suggested this a lot earlier. Not that I'm an
    alternative medicine fan because of this - it's like there's this huge
    gaping hole - the food intolerance gap - in mainstream medicine; people
    sense this hole, and they fill it up with "alternative" stuff, which has
    little grains of truth in it, along with a lot of non-truth filler.

    Laura
     
  8. Pizza Girl.

    Pizza Girl. Guest

    Well forty years ago your doctor may have locked you up or put you on
    barbituates for suggesting you had an intolerance or allergy to a food
    substance. The Naturopathic or alternative healers were all ridiculed, out
    of fear, as they are now, for the same treatment your "allergist" is
    suggesting.

    The alternative people are just 40-50 years ahead in most medical fields.

    "Lacustral" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    C.Health ([email protected]) wrote:

    >"People are not happy with Western medical treatment and are seeking
    >alternatives," said Babette Galang, complementary health officer ....."


    I solved a lot of health problems with elimination diet/food challenges,
    that mainstream medicine had never done anything for.

    Food intolerance isn't all that "alternative" - it was a conventional
    allergist who got me started on doing the elimination diet etc. But
    no mainstream type, even allergists, ever suggested that my various
    health problems might be from food intolerance.

    A naturopath might have suggested this a lot earlier. Not that I'm an
    alternative medicine fan because of this - it's like there's this huge
    gaping hole - the food intolerance gap - in mainstream medicine; people
    sense this hole, and they fill it up with "alternative" stuff, which has
    little grains of truth in it, along with a lot of non-truth filler.

    Laura
     
Loading...