alternative to squats

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Johan Larson, Feb 2, 2006.

  1. Johan Larson

    Johan Larson Guest

    Hi, folks.

    For complicated reasons, I find myself without access to a gym, a rack, or
    even a proper bench. That's not a problem for many of the exercies I want
    to do; I find I can do a lot with a pair of dumbells and a chinup bar.

    The one area I _do_ find I have trouble working is my legs. I would like to
    do real squats, but without a rack I just can't get enough weight over my
    head and onto my shoulders. The best alternative I've come up with are
    forward barbell lunges, which require a lot less weight. Is there a better
    alternative?

    Johan Larson
     
    Tags:


  2. Art S

    Art S Guest

    "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi, folks.
    >
    > For complicated reasons, I find myself without access to a gym, a rack, or
    > even a proper bench. That's not a problem for many of the exercies I want
    > to do; I find I can do a lot with a pair of dumbells and a chinup bar.
    >
    > The one area I _do_ find I have trouble working is my legs. I would like to
    > do real squats, but without a rack I just can't get enough weight over my
    > head and onto my shoulders. The best alternative I've come up with are
    > forward barbell lunges, which require a lot less weight. Is there a better
    > alternative?
    >
    > Johan Larson


    Deadlifts.

    Art
     
  3. John

    John Guest

    "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi, folks.
    >
    > For complicated reasons, I find myself without access to a gym, a rack, or
    > even a proper bench. That's not a problem for many of the exercies I want
    > to do; I find I can do a lot with a pair of dumbells and a chinup bar.
    >
    > The one area I _do_ find I have trouble working is my legs. I would like

    to
    > do real squats, but without a rack I just can't get enough weight over my
    > head and onto my shoulders. The best alternative I've come up with are
    > forward barbell lunges, which require a lot less weight. Is there a better
    > alternative?


    One-legged squats. BW or with dumbbells. Quite challenging....
     
  4. Johan Larson

    Johan Larson Guest

    John wrote:

    > "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote:
    >> For complicated reasons, I find myself without access to a gym, a
    >> rack, or even a proper bench.
    >> The one area I _do_ find I have trouble working is my legs. I would
    >> like to
    >> do real squats, but without a rack I just can't get enough weight
    >> over my head and onto my shoulders. Is
    >> there a better alternative?

    >
    > One-legged squats. BW or with dumbbells. Quite challenging....


    Hmm. With the unstressed leg completely off the ground, or just with as
    little weight on it as possible?

    Johan Larson
     
  5. Johan Larson

    Johan Larson Guest

    Art S wrote:
    >
    > "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote:
    >> For complicated reasons, I find myself without access to a gym, a
    >> rack, or even a proper bench.
    >>
    >> The one area I _do_ find I have trouble working is my legs. I would
    >> like to do real squats, but without a rack I just can't get enough
    >> weight over my head and onto my shoulders. The best alternative I've
    >> come up with are forward barbell lunges, which require a lot less
    >> weight. Is there a better alternative?

    >
    > Deadlifts.


    How much weight would I need for those? Do I need more than I would use for
    squats, or less?

    Johan Larson
     
  6. John

    John Guest

    "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > John wrote:
    >
    > > "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote:
    > >> For complicated reasons, I find myself without access to a gym, a
    > >> rack, or even a proper bench.
    > >> The one area I _do_ find I have trouble working is my legs. I would
    > >> like to
    > >> do real squats, but without a rack I just can't get enough weight
    > >> over my head and onto my shoulders. Is
    > >> there a better alternative?

    > >
    > > One-legged squats. BW or with dumbbells. Quite challenging....

    >
    > Hmm. With the unstressed leg completely off the ground, or just with as
    > little weight on it as possible?


    Off the ground and extended in front of you. Start with body weight and
    extend your arms for balance. Down, then up. With only one leg. Once you get
    your balance and can do ~10 reps, grab some DB's.
     
  7. Art S

    Art S Guest

    "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Art S wrote:
    >>
    >> "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote:
    >>> For complicated reasons, I find myself without access to a gym, a
    >>> rack, or even a proper bench.
    >>>
    >>> The one area I _do_ find I have trouble working is my legs. I would
    >>> like to do real squats, but without a rack I just can't get enough
    >>> weight over my head and onto my shoulders. The best alternative I've
    >>> come up with are forward barbell lunges, which require a lot less
    >>> weight. Is there a better alternative?

    >>
    >> Deadlifts.

    >
    > How much weight would I need for those? Do I need more than I would use for
    > squats, or less?
    >
    > Johan Larson


    Start light and make sure that you are using good form (back straight,
    etc.) as you increase the weight. Some people can squat more, some
    can deadlift more.

    Art
     
  8. Johan Larson

    Johan Larson Guest

    "Art S" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> How much weight would I need for those [deadlifts]?
    >> Do I need more than I would use for squats, or less?

    >
    > Start light and make sure that you are using good form (back straight,
    > etc.) as you increase the weight. Some people can squat more, some
    > can deadlift more.


    So we are talking about two-hundred-some pounds landing on my floor.
    Usually softly, but occasionally hard. Oh, if only I had the courage to be
    truly evil, and had a downstairs neighbor....

    :)

    Thanks for the advice,
    Johan
     
  9. Art S

    Art S Guest

    "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Art S" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >>> How much weight would I need for those [deadlifts]?
    >>> Do I need more than I would use for squats, or less?

    >>
    >> Start light and make sure that you are using good form (back straight,
    >> etc.) as you increase the weight. Some people can squat more, some
    >> can deadlift more.

    >
    > So we are talking about two-hundred-some pounds landing on my floor.
    > Usually softly, but occasionally hard. Oh, if only I had the courage to be
    > truly evil, and had a downstairs neighbor....
    >
    > :)
    >
    > Thanks for the advice,
    > Johan


    Exercise mat. Or horse-stall mat. Or not.

    Art
     
  10. The Crow

    The Crow Guest

    I'm sure I'll get crucified for this, but I would have thought that the one
    legged squats provide a better alternative to the deadlift.

    I find the barbell deadlift, whichever variation, quite hard to get spot on
    formwise - which I realise is my own fault - and that, for me, you really
    need a trap/shrug bar to get it spot on, which will cost more, and take up
    more room, than a cheapo pair of squat stands. So if they are out, I'd give
    the one-legs a try; but, as most people know, I myself am a novice, and know
    next to nothing.
     
  11. Johan Larson

    Johan Larson Guest

    "The Crow" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I find the barbell deadlift, whichever variation, quite hard to get
    > spot on formwise - which I realise is my own fault - and that, for me,
    > you really need a trap/shrug bar to get it spot on, which will cost
    > more, and take up more room, than a cheapo pair of squat stands.


    What's the problem? Do you have a physique that makes it difficult to get
    the bar to clear your knees without skinning them?

    Johan Larson
     
  12. John

    John Guest

    "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > "The Crow" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > I find the barbell deadlift, whichever variation, quite hard to get
    > > spot on formwise - which I realise is my own fault - and that, for me,
    > > you really need a trap/shrug bar to get it spot on, which will cost
    > > more, and take up more room, than a cheapo pair of squat stands.

    >
    > What's the problem? Do you have a physique that makes it difficult to get
    > the bar to clear your knees without skinning them?


    That's the fun part of DL's.
     
  13. "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi, folks.
    >
    > For complicated reasons, I find myself without access to a gym, a
    > rack, or
    > even a proper bench. That's not a problem for many of the exercies I
    > want
    > to do; I find I can do a lot with a pair of dumbells and a chinup bar.
    >
    > The one area I _do_ find I have trouble working is my legs. I would
    > like to
    > do real squats, but without a rack I just can't get enough weight over
    > my
    > head and onto my shoulders. The best alternative I've come up with are
    > forward barbell lunges, which require a lot less weight. Is there a
    > better
    > alternative?


    Besides the already mentioned deadlifts and one-legged squats, you've
    got several other good choices.

    A one-legged deadlift is pretty challenging, can be done with dumbbells,
    and requires less than half the weight of a regular DL or SQ. To
    duplicate the range of motion of a normal deadlift, either stand the
    dumbbells on end or raise them a bit, or just enjoy the larger range of
    motion.

    Front squat is OK without a rack because you can just dump the weight
    forward - stack up some cider blocks or similar if you have trouble
    getting the weight to the starting position.

    Behind-the-back deadlifts may have more carryover to barbell back squats
    than regular deadlifts - not sure about that - and the weight used is
    usually lighter and you don't generally drop them, so they might be near
    perfect for your situation.

    If your knees are up to it, the real hack squat, where you hold a
    dumbbell or kettlebell behind your back and squat on your toes - that's
    one tough movement. If you Google

    kettlebell hack squat

    you'll find some reading - most people seem to be able to do only 15-20%
    of the weight they can back squat. This one can be hard on your knees
    but most people should be able to work up to doing it. The DragonDoor
    link that comes up a few down the list has some pictures and pretty
    detailed instructions. (As I understand it, the "real" hack lift
    involves coming up on your toes, while staying flat-footed is a
    behind-the-back DL and not a hack squat.)

    Hope that helps you some.

    -S-
    http://www.kbnj.com
     
  14. In article <8%[email protected]>,
    "Art S" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Hi, folks.
    > >
    > > For complicated reasons, I find myself without access to a gym, a rack, or
    > > even a proper bench. That's not a problem for many of the exercies I want
    > > to do; I find I can do a lot with a pair of dumbells and a chinup bar.
    > >
    > > The one area I _do_ find I have trouble working is my legs. I would like to
    > > do real squats, but without a rack I just can't get enough weight over my
    > > head and onto my shoulders. The best alternative I've come up with are
    > > forward barbell lunges, which require a lot less weight. Is there a better
    > > alternative?
    > >
    > > Johan Larson

    >
    > Deadlifts.
    >
    > Art
    >
    >


    Indeed... but it does not work the quads very well IMHO.
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  15. Curt James

    Curt James Guest

    Steve Freides wrote:
    > "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote


    [...]

    > > I would like to do real squats, but without a rack I just
    > > can't get enough weight over my head and onto my
    > > shoulders. The best alternative I've come up with are
    > > forward barbell lunges, which require a lot less weight.
    > > Is there a better alternative?

    >
    > Besides the already mentioned deadlifts and one-legged
    > squats, you've got several other good choices.
    >
    > A one-legged deadlift is pretty challenging, can be done with dumbbells,
    > and requires less than half the weight of a regular DL or SQ. To
    > duplicate the range of motion of a normal deadlift, either stand the
    > dumbbells on end or raise them a bit, or just enjoy the larger range of
    > motion.
    >
    > Front squat is OK without a rack because you can just dump the weight
    > forward - stack up some cider blocks or similar if you have trouble
    > getting the weight to the starting position.
    >
    > Behind-the-back deadlifts may have more carryover to barbell back squats
    > than regular deadlifts - not sure about that - and the weight used is
    > usually lighter and you don't generally drop them, so they might be near
    > perfect for your situation.
    >
    > If your knees are up to it, the real hack squat, where you hold a
    > dumbbell or kettlebell behind your back and squat on your toes - that's
    > one tough movement. If you Google kettlebell hack squat
    >
    > you'll find some reading - most people seem to be able to do only 15-20%
    > of the weight they can back squat. This one can be hard on your knees
    > but most people should be able to work up to doing it. The DragonDoor
    > link that comes up a few down the list has some pictures and pretty
    > detailed instructions. (As I understand it, the "real" hack lift
    > involves coming up on your toes, while staying flat-footed is a
    > behind-the-back DL and not a hack squat.)
    >
    > Hope that helps you some.
    >
    > -S-
    > http://www.kbnj.com


    "Straddle Lift (Jefferson Lift) - A squatting movement. Straddle the
    bar, squat down, grab it with one hand in front of the body and one
    hand behind...keep back very straight (this is critical)...and do a
    squatting exercise."

    See also: http://danjohn.org/cj.pdf

    --
    Curt
    http://curtjames.com/
     
  16. JRH

    JRH Guest

    On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 10:10:33 -0600, OmManiPadmeOmelet
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <8%[email protected]>,
    > "Art S" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]
    >> > Hi, folks.
    >> >
    >> > For complicated reasons, I find myself without access to a gym, a rack, or
    >> > even a proper bench. That's not a problem for many of the exercies I want
    >> > to do; I find I can do a lot with a pair of dumbells and a chinup bar.
    >> >
    >> > The one area I _do_ find I have trouble working is my legs. I would like to
    >> > do real squats, but without a rack I just can't get enough weight over my
    >> > head and onto my shoulders. The best alternative I've come up with are
    >> > forward barbell lunges, which require a lot less weight. Is there a better
    >> > alternative?
    >> >
    >> > Johan Larson

    >>
    >> Deadlifts.
    >>
    >> Art
    >>
    >>

    >
    >Indeed... but it does not work the quads very well IMHO.


    Nothing humble about that opinion Om, the quads in this very popular
    exercise are synergists, but it's not a good "alternative to squats"!

    Have a great weekend mate - I usually do! ;o)

    TFIF!
     
  17. Hobbes

    Hobbes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    JRH <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 10:10:33 -0600, OmManiPadmeOmelet
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <8%[email protected]>,
    > > "Art S" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote in message
    > >> news:[email protected]
    > >> > Hi, folks.
    > >> >
    > >> > For complicated reasons, I find myself without access to a gym, a rack,
    > >> > or
    > >> > even a proper bench. That's not a problem for many of the exercies I
    > >> > want
    > >> > to do; I find I can do a lot with a pair of dumbells and a chinup bar.
    > >> >
    > >> > The one area I _do_ find I have trouble working is my legs. I would like
    > >> > to
    > >> > do real squats, but without a rack I just can't get enough weight over
    > >> > my
    > >> > head and onto my shoulders. The best alternative I've come up with are
    > >> > forward barbell lunges, which require a lot less weight. Is there a
    > >> > better
    > >> > alternative?
    > >> >
    > >> > Johan Larson
    > >>
    > >> Deadlifts.
    > >>
    > >> Art
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >Indeed... but it does not work the quads very well IMHO.

    >
    > Nothing humble about that opinion Om, the quads in this very popular
    > exercise are synergists, but it's not a good "alternative to squats"!
    >
    > Have a great weekend mate - I usually do! ;o)


    Quadriceps are knee extensors - the knees extend in deadlifts. Quads are
    movers in a full deadlift, albeit through a limited ROM.

    --
    Keith
     
  18. JRH

    JRH Guest

    On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 12:18:17 -0600, Hobbes <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > JRH <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 10:10:33 -0600, OmManiPadmeOmelet
    >> <[email protected]kenegz.com> wrote:
    >>
    >> >In article <8%[email protected]>,
    >> > "Art S" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote in message
    >> >> news:[email protected]
    >> >> > Hi, folks.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > For complicated reasons, I find myself without access to a gym, a rack,
    >> >> > or
    >> >> > even a proper bench. That's not a problem for many of the exercies I
    >> >> > want
    >> >> > to do; I find I can do a lot with a pair of dumbells and a chinup bar.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > The one area I _do_ find I have trouble working is my legs. I would like
    >> >> > to
    >> >> > do real squats, but without a rack I just can't get enough weight over
    >> >> > my
    >> >> > head and onto my shoulders. The best alternative I've come up with are
    >> >> > forward barbell lunges, which require a lot less weight. Is there a
    >> >> > better
    >> >> > alternative?
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Johan Larson
    >> >>
    >> >> Deadlifts.
    >> >>
    >> >> Art
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >Indeed... but it does not work the quads very well IMHO.

    >>
    >> Nothing humble about that opinion Om, the quads in this very popular
    >> exercise are synergists, but it's not a good "alternative to squats"!
    >>
    >> Have a great weekend mate - I usually do! ;o)

    >
    >Quadriceps are knee extensors - the knees extend in deadlifts. Quads are
    >movers in a full deadlift, albeit through a limited ROM.


    This is a golden oldie here, and it normally depends on whom we want
    to prove wrong. It is normal if someone says deadlifts are a good
    quad exercise for people to jump up and down saying things like
    "crap"!

    On the other hand if someone else says that they are not a good quad
    exercise, then it is quite usual to go the other way and say that they
    are.

    Watch my lips Keith: the deadlift is a back exercise primarily, with
    the quads acting as only one of a number of synergists. The hamstrings
    are a useful stabiliser.

    Have a great weekend old friend - I usually do!

    TFIF!
     
  19. Hobbes

    Hobbes Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    JRH <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 12:18:17 -0600, Hobbes <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>,
    > > JRH <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 10:10:33 -0600, OmManiPadmeOmelet
    > >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >In article <8%[email protected]>,
    > >> > "Art S" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >> "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote in message
    > >> >> news:[email protected]
    > >> >> > Hi, folks.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > For complicated reasons, I find myself without access to a gym, a
    > >> >> > rack,
    > >> >> > or
    > >> >> > even a proper bench. That's not a problem for many of the exercies I
    > >> >> > want
    > >> >> > to do; I find I can do a lot with a pair of dumbells and a chinup
    > >> >> > bar.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > The one area I _do_ find I have trouble working is my legs. I would
    > >> >> > like
    > >> >> > to
    > >> >> > do real squats, but without a rack I just can't get enough weight
    > >> >> > over
    > >> >> > my
    > >> >> > head and onto my shoulders. The best alternative I've come up with
    > >> >> > are
    > >> >> > forward barbell lunges, which require a lot less weight. Is there a
    > >> >> > better
    > >> >> > alternative?
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > Johan Larson
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Deadlifts.
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Art
    > >> >>
    > >> >>
    > >> >
    > >> >Indeed... but it does not work the quads very well IMHO.
    > >>
    > >> Nothing humble about that opinion Om, the quads in this very popular
    > >> exercise are synergists, but it's not a good "alternative to squats"!
    > >>
    > >> Have a great weekend mate - I usually do! ;o)

    > >
    > >Quadriceps are knee extensors - the knees extend in deadlifts. Quads are
    > >movers in a full deadlift, albeit through a limited ROM.

    >
    > This is a golden oldie here, and it normally depends on whom we want
    > to prove wrong. It is normal if someone says deadlifts are a good
    > quad exercise for people to jump up and down saying things like
    > "crap"!
    >
    > On the other hand if someone else says that they are not a good quad
    > exercise, then it is quite usual to go the other way and say that they
    > are.
    >
    > Watch my lips Keith: the deadlift is a back exercise primarily, with
    > the quads acting as only one of a number of synergists. The hamstrings
    > are a useful stabiliser.
    >
    > Have a great weekend old friend - I usually do!
    >
    > TFIF!
    >


    I used to be of the opinion they weren't much good for quads. However,
    right now several of the best sprint coaches in the US are having their
    athletes use deadlifts for a strengthening exercise rather than
    deadlifts. Not because of the back - because of strengthening the quads
    (knee extension) and hamstrings (hip extension). Considering some of the
    times that are being run I can't argue with them!

    I do agree that if you think in bodybuilding terms (max hypertrophy)
    there are better exercises, but if you are thinking in terms of strength
    development the quads and hamstrings get a major dose.

    --
    Keith
     
  20. JRH

    JRH Guest

    On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 12:38:16 -0600, Hobbes <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > JRH <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 12:18:17 -0600, Hobbes <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >> >In article <[email protected]>,
    >> > JRH <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 10:10:33 -0600, OmManiPadmeOmelet
    >> >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >> >In article <8%[email protected]>,
    >> >> > "Art S" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >> >
    >> >> >> "Johan Larson" <johan0larson8comcast0net> wrote in message
    >> >> >> news:[email protected]
    >> >> >> > Hi, folks.
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> > For complicated reasons, I find myself without access to a gym, a
    >> >> >> > rack,
    >> >> >> > or
    >> >> >> > even a proper bench. That's not a problem for many of the exercies I
    >> >> >> > want
    >> >> >> > to do; I find I can do a lot with a pair of dumbells and a chinup
    >> >> >> > bar.
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> > The one area I _do_ find I have trouble working is my legs. I would
    >> >> >> > like
    >> >> >> > to
    >> >> >> > do real squats, but without a rack I just can't get enough weight
    >> >> >> > over
    >> >> >> > my
    >> >> >> > head and onto my shoulders. The best alternative I've come up with
    >> >> >> > are
    >> >> >> > forward barbell lunges, which require a lot less weight. Is there a
    >> >> >> > better
    >> >> >> > alternative?
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> > Johan Larson
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> Deadlifts.
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> Art
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >
    >> >> >Indeed... but it does not work the quads very well IMHO.
    >> >>
    >> >> Nothing humble about that opinion Om, the quads in this very popular
    >> >> exercise are synergists, but it's not a good "alternative to squats"!
    >> >>
    >> >> Have a great weekend mate - I usually do! ;o)
    >> >
    >> >Quadriceps are knee extensors - the knees extend in deadlifts. Quads are
    >> >movers in a full deadlift, albeit through a limited ROM.

    >>
    >> This is a golden oldie here, and it normally depends on whom we want
    >> to prove wrong. It is normal if someone says deadlifts are a good
    >> quad exercise for people to jump up and down saying things like
    >> "crap"!
    >>
    >> On the other hand if someone else says that they are not a good quad
    >> exercise, then it is quite usual to go the other way and say that they
    >> are.
    >>
    >> Watch my lips Keith: the deadlift is a back exercise primarily, with
    >> the quads acting as only one of a number of synergists. The hamstrings
    >> are a useful stabiliser.
    >>
    >> Have a great weekend old friend - I usually do!
    >>
    >> TFIF!
    >>

    >
    >I used to be of the opinion they weren't much good for quads. However,
    >right now several of the best sprint coaches in the US are having their
    >athletes use deadlifts for a strengthening exercise rather than
    >deadlifts.


    ??
    I gather you meant squats.

    >
    >Not because of the back - because of strengthening the quads
    >(knee extension) and hamstrings (hip extension). Considering some of the
    >times that are being run I can't argue with them!


    I'm surprised that coaches are only just beginning to see the merits.

    >
    >I do agree that if you think in bodybuilding terms (max hypertrophy)
    >there are better exercises, but if you are thinking in terms of strength
    >development the quads and hamstrings get a major dose.


    I agree, and I have always considered deadlifts to be a superb
    exercise for the legs, as well as the back, but it hasn't always been
    popularly agreed here.
     
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