Alternatives to cumin and coriander in a curry?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Sudy, Jan 27, 2004.

  1. Sudy

    Sudy Guest

    Hello

    My blood test revealed a mild intolerance to coriander, cumin and dill. I want to keep eating
    curries,and without these ingredients if possible, but as I've not experimented yet, I'm a bit
    worried that the curries will now taste awful.

    Is there anything I can use or make as alternatives, or, could I do without them anyway and not
    notice much of a difference?

    Thanks in advance

    Sudy
     
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  2. Kamala

    Kamala Guest

    [email protected] (Sudy) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hello
    >
    > My blood test revealed a mild intolerance to coriander, cumin and dill. I want to keep eating
    > curries,and without these ingredients if possible, but as I've not experimented yet, I'm a bit
    > worried that the curries will now taste awful.
    >
    > Is there anything I can use or make as alternatives, or, could I do without them anyway and not
    > notice much of a difference?
    >
    > Thanks in advance
    >
    > Sudy

    Use a lot of onions, fresh ginger, black pepper and serrano/jalapeno peppers(if you can tolerate the
    heat) and some turmeric, cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg to make your curries. You will barely miss the
    coriander/cumin at least in tomato-based North Indian dishes. For South Indian dishes like
    sambhar/rasam you are out of luck, although you should be fine if you can stick to the coconut based
    ones like kootu/avial.

    Good Luck, Kamala.
     
  3. Mark Thorson

    Mark Thorson Guest

    Sudy wrote:

    > My blood test revealed a mild intolerance to coriander, cumin and dill. I want to keep eating
    > curries,and without these ingredients if possible, but as I've not experimented yet, I'm a bit
    > worried that the curries will now taste awful.

    Who made this diagnosis? Was it a medical doctor, or some kind of "alternative medicine"
    practitioner, like a chiropractor, iridologist, or naturopath? Was the diagnosis made with a device
    called a Syncrometer?
     
  4. Sam Salmon

    Sam Salmon Guest

    On Tue, 27 Jan 2004 20:13:21 GMT, Mark Thorson <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Sudy wrote:
    >
    >> My blood test revealed a mild intolerance to coriander, cumin and dill. I want to keep eating
    >> curries,and without these ingredients if possible, but as I've not experimented yet, I'm a bit
    >> worried that the curries will now taste awful.
    >
    >Who made this diagnosis? Was it a medical doctor, or some kind of "alternative medicine"
    >practitioner, like a chiropractor, iridologist, or naturopath? Was the diagnosis made with a device
    >called a Syncrometer?
    >

    The test you took was 100% quackery-ignore it and ask for your money back!!!
     
  5. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Sudy wrote:
    >
    > > My blood test revealed a mild intolerance to coriander, cumin and dill. I want to keep eating
    > > curries,and without these ingredients if possible, but as I've not experimented yet, I'm a bit
    > > worried that the curries will now taste awful.
    >
    > Who made this diagnosis? Was it a medical doctor, or some kind of "alternative medicine"
    > practitioner, like a chiropractor, iridologist, or naturopath? Was the diagnosis made with a
    > device called a Syncrometer?
    >

    It may have been a wide-ranging blood screen for allergens similar to one I took a while back. They
    take 6 or 8 tubes of blood and then test it against literally hundreds of foods, pollens, and other
    potential allergens. The problem with this test it that it is totally chemical in nature - if the
    allergen in question causes a certain reaction in a blood sample it is labeled as "sensitive." I
    pinned my doctor to the wall to get a more detailed explanation of the benefits. He admitted that a
    sensitivity as revealed by this test often did not correlate with actual symptoms or other problems
    experienced by the patient. It is more useful as a screen. If it reveals a sensitivity to something
    then you can remove that from your diet for a while and see if you feel better. If so, great - if
    not, then there's no reason not to go back to eating it.

    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  6. Donna Pattee

    Donna Pattee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Sudy wrote:
    >
    >> My blood test revealed a mild intolerance to coriander, cumin and dill. I want to keep eating
    >> curries,and without these ingredients if possible, but as I've not experimented yet, I'm a bit
    >> worried that the curries will now taste awful.
    >
    >Who made this diagnosis? Was it a medical doctor, or some kind of "alternative medicine"
    >practitioner, like a chiropractor, iridologist, or naturopath? Was the diagnosis made with a device
    >called a Syncrometer?
    >
    >
    >

    I'm so glad someone else asked this first :) I wondered the exact thing and also what it means to
    be "intolerant" (mildly or otherwise) to a spice.
     
  7. Blake Murphy

    Blake Murphy Guest

    On 28 Jan 2004 21:40:52 GMT, [email protected] (Donna Pattee)
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>Sudy wrote:
    >>
    >>> My blood test revealed a mild intolerance to coriander, cumin and dill. I want to keep eating
    >>> curries,and without these ingredients if possible, but as I've not experimented yet, I'm a bit
    >>> worried that the curries will now taste awful.
    >>
    >>Who made this diagnosis? Was it a medical doctor, or some kind of "alternative medicine"
    >>practitioner, like a chiropractor, iridologist, or naturopath? Was the diagnosis made with a
    >>device called a Syncrometer?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >I'm so glad someone else asked this first :) I wondered the exact thing and also what it means to
    >be "intolerant" (mildly or otherwise) to a spice.

    me, i can't stand ketchup on hot dogs.

    your pal, blake
     
  8. blake murphy wrote:

    > On 28 Jan 2004 21:40:52 GMT, [email protected] (Donna Pattee) wrote:
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>, Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>Sudy wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> My blood test revealed a mild intolerance to coriander, cumin and dill. I want to keep eating
    >>>> curries,and without these ingredients if possible, but as I've not experimented yet, I'm a bit
    >>>> worried that the curries will now taste awful.
    >>>
    >>>Who made this diagnosis? Was it a medical doctor, or some kind of "alternative medicine"
    >>>practitioner, like a chiropractor, iridologist, or naturopath? Was the diagnosis made with a
    >>>device called a Syncrometer?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>I'm so glad someone else asked this first :) I wondered the exact thing and also what it means to
    >>be "intolerant" (mildly or otherwise) to a spice.
    >
    > me, i can't stand ketchup on hot dogs.
    >

    That's not a medical condition --- it's just good sense.

    ---jkb

    --
    "No sprinkles! For every sprinkle I find, I shall kill you!"

    -- Stewie Griffin
     
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