Aluminium Bike Problem

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by BHappy, Apr 27, 2015.

  1. BHappy

    BHappy New Member

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    3 weeks ago i started doing some tests with a backpack with a load of 25, 15, 8 pounds. My distance is about 16 Kms and i was wondering if i needed to buy a rack to go each week to a rustic place for 2 to 4 days. I am not feeling OK but i am not sure if the problem is due to an all Aluminium bike(frame and fork) or the load on my back.
    Let s say my all ALU bike is creating the problem where would i feel problem(s)?
    I like that hybrid bike for winter and city daily use but maybe a road bike ALU with a carbon fork Worth about 1,300$ would be a Wise investment. With my city short distances i was using underflated tires but for longer rides i invested in a pump and maybe that adds to the vibrations wich would be my first guest as the source of my problem.
    I could solve this with more weeks of testing but soon i want to do rides over 2Hrs, 3-4 times weekly.
    Thanks :)
     
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  2. An old Guy

    An old Guy Member

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    I used to use a cheap rack on my aluminum road bike (80's Vitus; 20mm tires). I think a rack is a better choice than a backpack.
     
  3. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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  4. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't buy the cheapest rack but look at the Topeak Explorer it's designed to handle up to 55 pounds but don't ever trust those statements, it may hold 55 pounds with no trouble as long as you're on smooth roads, but if you hit a bump and the load goes up then down it puts a lot more load stress than 55 pounds, so if all you carry is 25 pounds than this rack is good for you. Cheap racks will break, usually at the welds, and a broken rack will ruin your tour, most cheap racks won't handle more than 10 to 15 pounds of actual load. If you plan on doing heavier touring in the future than you need to look a the Tubus Cosmos, yes it cost more but it won't break.
     
  5. BHappy

    BHappy New Member

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    thanks, i just replaced my bike for a smaller frame because at 57 i shrank. I got a rack and soon i will get bags/paniers. From a 60 i am down to a 55 wich should offer a more comfortable position. With no camping i expect not to exceed 18-20 pounds.
     
  6. kylerlittle

    kylerlittle Member

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    That's cool.
     
  7. DancingLady

    DancingLady Member

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    I think a rack is a good idea if you are carrying very many pounds. Your center of gravity is already fairly high with a road bike, so adding more weight to your back ah make you too heavy, which could cause excess muscle strain to keep you balanced or even be a hazard for you by altering your balance too much. If you pack your weight low and behind you, you will be more grounded rather than less.
     
  8. BHappy

    BHappy New Member

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    In braking my back Wheel was lifting too often so for safety i had no choice. :huh:
     
  9. Jcycle

    Jcycle Active Member

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    You need a rack. I wouldn't carry all that on my back. It changes your center of gravity and is restrictive.
     
  10. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    Plus a rack will keep the weight more on the rear of the bike so you don't lift as easy vs using a backpack. You can also learn to shift your weight by sliding your butt off the rear of the saddle when braking thus again putting more weight on the rear, with daily practice this will become second nature even in an emergency.
     
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