Aluminum ferrule cable casing from IRD (Nokon, etc.)



C

Chris M

Guest
I have enough ferrules for 2 bikes, brakes and shift cables and have
used them for about 5 years. The aluminum appears to have no finish
(though I think some alternate colors must be anodized, but I have the
naked aluminum) and those that have spent time under the handlebar tape
for any length of time have been exposed to enough sweat that many of
them have enough corrosion to cause problems replacing the lining. I am
just finishing an overhaul and the only unused ferrules at this point
need to be reamed or somehow restored to the inside diameter to allow
them to function properly. I don't have a file small enough and that
seems like it should be my last resort. What I would really like to
find is a chemical solution that will remove or at least loosen the
corrosion. I have a faint recollection of some common chemicals that
will work as I would like (coke, vinegar, something else)?

Any ideas?
 
D

davet

Guest
Chris M wrote:
> I have enough ferrules for 2 bikes, brakes and shift cables and have
> used them for about 5 years. The aluminum appears to have no finish
> (though I think some alternate colors must be anodized, but I have the
> naked aluminum) and those that have spent time under the handlebar tape
> for any length of time have been exposed to enough sweat that many of
> them have enough corrosion to cause problems replacing the lining. I am
> just finishing an overhaul and the only unused ferrules at this point
> need to be reamed or somehow restored to the inside diameter to allow
> them to function properly. I don't have a file small enough and that
> seems like it should be my last resort. What I would really like to
> find is a chemical solution that will remove or at least loosen the
> corrosion. I have a faint recollection of some common chemicals that
> will work as I would like (coke, vinegar, something else)?
>
> Any ideas?

Naval Jelly?
 
W

Werehatrack

Guest
On 31 May 2006 12:31:26 -0700, "Chris M" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>I have enough ferrules for 2 bikes, brakes and shift cables and have
>used them for about 5 years. The aluminum appears to have no finish
>(though I think some alternate colors must be anodized, but I have the
>naked aluminum) and those that have spent time under the handlebar tape
>for any length of time have been exposed to enough sweat that many of
>them have enough corrosion to cause problems replacing the lining. I am
>just finishing an overhaul and the only unused ferrules at this point
>need to be reamed or somehow restored to the inside diameter to allow
>them to function properly. I don't have a file small enough and that
>seems like it should be my last resort. What I would really like to
>find is a chemical solution that will remove or at least loosen the
>corrosion. I have a faint recollection of some common chemicals that
>will work as I would like (coke, vinegar, something else)?
>
>Any ideas?


Ammonia is the substance you seek. It will do nothing to other
metals, but it removes the common oxidation products from aluminum
readily.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
 
Q

Qui si parla Campagnolo

Guest
Chris M wrote:
> I have enough ferrules for 2 bikes, brakes and shift cables and have
> used them for about 5 years. The aluminum appears to have no finish
> (though I think some alternate colors must be anodized, but I have the
> naked aluminum) and those that have spent time under the handlebar tape
> for any length of time have been exposed to enough sweat that many of
> them have enough corrosion to cause problems replacing the lining. I am
> just finishing an overhaul and the only unused ferrules at this point
> need to be reamed or somehow restored to the inside diameter to allow
> them to function properly. I don't have a file small enough and that
> seems like it should be my last resort. What I would really like to
> find is a chemical solution that will remove or at least loosen the
> corrosion. I have a faint recollection of some common chemicals that
> will work as I would like (coke, vinegar, something else)?
>
> Any ideas?


Go to a bike shop and get brass ferrules.
 
D

dvt

Guest
Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
> Chris M wrote:
>> I have enough ferrules for 2 bikes, brakes and shift cables and have
>> used them for about 5 years.


> Go to a bike shop and get brass ferrules.


At least get some new ferrules. If you've done a lot of riding in those
5 years, your ferrules have done their job. When a ferrule gives up,
it's can be tough to figure out. It will be easy to replace them now,
and more difficult to do so later.

--
Dave
dvt at psu dot edu
 
C

Chris M

Guest
dvt wrote:
> Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
> > Chris M wrote:
> >> I have enough ferrules for 2 bikes, brakes and shift cables and have
> >> used them for about 5 years.

>
> > Go to a bike shop and get brass ferrules.

>
> At least get some new ferrules. If you've done a lot of riding in those
> 5 years, your ferrules have done their job. When a ferrule gives up,
> it's can be tough to figure out. It will be easy to replace them now,
> and more difficult to do so later.
>
> --
> Dave
> dvt at psu dot edu


They are no longer sold by IRD and I don't need a whole new set. I need
to clean about 18", from those that spent time under the top of my
handlebars. It is hard enough to find the new sets and nearly
impossible to buy sub-components. Cleaning is the way to go. I can
almost get 3 bikes anyway because they supply enough for bike that use
long runs and my bikes are set up to use minimal casing and initially
I had extra.
 
C

Chris M

Guest

>
> Ammonia is the substance you seek. It will do nothing to other
> metals, but it removes the common oxidation products from aluminum
> readily.




Awesome, thanks! I knew there has to be at least one easy way.
 
S

SYJ

Guest
dvt wrote:
> Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
> > Chris M wrote:
> >> I have enough ferrules for 2 bikes, brakes and shift cables and have
> >> used them for about 5 years.

>
> > Go to a bike shop and get brass ferrules.

>
> At least get some new ferrules. If you've done a lot of riding in those
> 5 years, your ferrules have done their job. When a ferrule gives up,
> it's can be tough to figure out. It will be easy to replace them now,
> and more difficult to do so later.
>
> --
> Dave
> dvt at psu dot edu


I believe that by 'ferrules', OP means the segmented aluminum bits that
make up Nokon (or in his case, IRD) cable housing. Aztek makes similar
stuff, IIRC. Regardless, I'm fairly sure that all of the varieties
come in aluminum only (no Brass Nokon goodies when I was last shopping
for new housing, anyway).

SYJ