Aluminum tiagra vs carbon 105



tdcadillac

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Hello guys,

I found a Ridley 105 carbon around $2.3K and the Davinci 105 carbon around the same price and I am debating buying one of them instead of cannondale synapse tiagra aluminium
I read that cannondale synapse are great bike and want to know if sacrificing 105 for the tiagra is worth-ed.
I am new to biking and will be using the bike mainly for training and one race a year in the future. Don't want to end up having a bike for one year and be forced to sell it as it will not fulfill my need in the future
appreciate your feedback to know if I am doing the right choice to have 105 in carbon bike or go cannondale synapse aluminium with tiagra.
Thanks a bunch to all
 

Mr. Beanz

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Aug 18, 2015
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As long as a bike fits well, has 105, I'd do it! I have 105 on my 2005 bike and still going strong. Never once a problem while keeping it adjusted and lubed. Figure I have over 30,000 miles on it and only ever changed cables which is normal wear and tear.
 
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Mr. Beanz

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Yup, I bought my bike originally in 2005. Frame snapped, frame replacement. Had 13,000 miles on it.

Another 4 years and another 13,000 miles, another broken frame and frame swap.

Current frame, 15,000 miles, not broken yet! :D

So I figure over 41,000 miles and the 105 is still working great!

I only replaced the cables during the frame swap and one other time as the cable wore.

That is why I would go with 105 any day!
 
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Froze

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The component brand who really made indestructible components was Suntour, I have my racing bike from the 80's with all Superbe components on it, that bike has over 250,000 miles on it and the darn components still work fine, the bike paint isn't doing fine though, but the components still work and look great. I no longer ride it now due to a bit of hesitation of the miles on the stuff and not wanting a breakdown on the road, not sure if there's anything to worry about or not, but I don't want find out either. When I retire I plan on getting that bike repainted and put new decals on it.
 

tdcadillac

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Yup, I bought my bike originally in 2005. Frame snapped, frame replacement. Had 13,000 miles on it.

Another 4 years and another 13,000 miles, another broken frame and frame swap.

Current frame, 15,000 miles, not broken yet! :D

So I figure over 41,000 miles and the 105 is still working great!

I only replaced the cables during the frame swap and one other time as the cable wore.

That is why I would go with 105 any day!

With all the good feedback. I will not even think tiagra anymore :)
I am settled with the 105. For the frame, why it has broke, any advice how to avoid a frame that will broke. Is all the manufacturer provide free frame for a broken frame? I like the ridley 105 carbon but don't want to rush till I am sure the frame is good :) any suggestion what frame to avoid and what to go for it? What other part in the bike should i consider as well in top of the group and the frame?
too many questions i am affraid too many to come as I am new newbie :)
 

tdcadillac

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I am thinking this bike what do you guys think? If you see any components you dont like please highlight it to me so I can narrow my search better in the future. Thank you so much

FRAMESET
FRAME
Norco Valence, Aluminum, 9x130mm QR Dropouts
FORK
Norco Valence Mid-Modulus Carbon Fork, 9x100mm QR
HEADSET
Angular Sealed Cartridge Bearings - Tapered
HEADSET SPACER
2x10mm, 1x5mm, Aluminum
DRIVETRAIN
FRONT DERAILLEUR
Shimano 105 FD-R7000, 2 Speed
REAR DERAILLEUR
Shimano 105 RD-R7000-GS, 11 Speed
CASSETTE
Shimano 105 CS-R7000, 11-32T, 11 Speed
CHAIN
KMC X11, 11 Speed
CRANKSET
Shimano FC-RS510, 170mm (48/50.5) | 172.5mm (53/55.5) | 175mm (58/60.5), 50/34T
BOTTOM BRACKET
Shimano HollowTech II BB, Threaded BSA 68mm
SHIFTER FRONT
Shimano 105 ST-R7000, 2 Speed
SHIFTER REAR
Shimano 105 ST-R7000, 11 Speed
COMPONENTS
HANDLEBAR
Norco Endurance - Black
STEM
Norco SL Alloy - Black
SEAT POST
Norco SL Alloy, 27.2mm
SEAT POST CLAMP
Alloy, 31.8mm, Black
SADDLE
Norco Race - Black
FRONT BRAKE
Tektro R540, Dual Pivot Caliper V-Brake
REAR BRAKE
Tektro R540, Dual Pivot Caliper V-Brake
BRAKE LEVERS
Shimano 105 ST-R7000
BAR TAPE
Norco Classic EVA Gel, Black
WHEELS
FRONT HUB
Alloy Sealed Bearing 24h - Black
REAR HUB
Alloy Sealed Bearing, 28 Hole, 10x130mm QR
SPOKES/NIPPLES
Black Stainless w/Brass Nipple
RIMS
Alex Alloy Double Wall, 24 Hole Front/28 Hole Rear
FRONT TIRE
Schwalbe Lugano, 700x25c, Black
REAR TIRE
Schwalbe Lugano, 700x25c, Black
REAR HUB SKEWER
Alloy QR
FRONT HUB SKEWER
Alloy QR
 

Mr. Beanz

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Aug 18, 2015
1,774
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With all the good feedback. I will not even think tiagra anymore :)
I am settled with the 105. For the frame, why it has broke, any advice how to avoid a frame that will broke. Is all the manufacturer provide free frame for a broken frame? I like the ridley 105 carbon but don't want to rush till I am sure the frame is good :) any suggestion what frame to avoid and what to go for it? What other part in the bike should i consider as well in top of the group and the frame?
too many questions i am affraid too many to come as I am new newbie :)


Ha! I think many have their opinions and different experiences. I'm a heavy rider, at 230 I am as skinny as I will ever be, at 6'1 tall. I ride hard at times and at times training for climbing timed events. That is when I noticed I snapped a couple of frames. I was climbing a 10% grade in the mountains when one frame popped. It was a flimsy alum frame to start with, Lemond Tourmalet. Flimsy frame, snapped after 13,000 miles\3 years.

broke.jpg


It was replaced with a Lemond Chambery, partial alum and partial carbon. Another 13,000 miles/3 years and it snapped. I loved this bike, great ride but I think it snapped because of the cut out at the rear dropout that was probably there to cut weight on the frame. So I myself would avoid another frame with a similar cutout. It broke at the aluminum section.

BrokenL1_zpsclsmbdgh.jpg
BrokenL3_zpsdnis89bc.jpg


That was replaced by a full carbon Madone, 15,000+ miles on it and not a problem. It is a 2014 frame.


DSCN0751_zpsdj1ewjkc.jpg


As far as wheels? Being a heavy guy, I don't put much faith in stock wheels. I get about 2,000 miles out of a rear wheel then it's toast. I build my own now and use a Velocity Deep V in the back for durability. Heavy rim but I'd rather ride my bike for 20,000 miles without issue vs ride a light supposedly fast wheel for $2,000 and have to replace it in a year.

I started building my own wheels after way too many issues with machine built and hand built by idiots at the shop. Seriously, I had the same exact model fail after the first 40 miles. I started building my own, same exact equipment, 20,000+ miles out of my first wheel.

Not to mention, the more I train, the less I feel of the wheel weight, not that I feel it anyway. I have had buddies preach expensive light race wheels to me but then they are drafting me ha ha!

So depending on your weight, you may get a decent amount out of stock wheels but at this point, I toss the wheels as soon as I get home because if I am planning on a new bike, I've already built a set of wheels for it.

So use the stock wheel if you can. Then upgrade after that. Bikes aren't wear and toss. You simply replace the difficult component then get back on it again. I've changed my wheels several times on all my bikes.

As far as frames, I have a 1998 ALUMINUM Cannondale that I still ride. Still stiff.

I ride the carbon Trek Madone, 15,000 miles no problem.

Flimsy broken alum frame above.

Broken partial carbon/ alum mix frame that broke at the alum section.

Have a steel tandem from 1997 that we still ride and not a problem.

So nowadays, it is more like get a bike, ride it, if something breaks, replace it. Some frames last longer than others. If I got another alum frame, I'd make sure it wasn't wimpy and flimsy at the bottom bracket area.

As I said, your results may very depending on your size. This is me at 225 pounds. Skinny as I can get at 45 years of age. The guy next to me is 160 pounds. This was in Arizona, just got done riding a mostly solo 62 mile ride at 20 mph average speed. I rode the last 1/3 with a guy who wouldn't stop begging me to ride with him after his team mate had mechanical problems. I just wanted to get back because the first 100 riders in got medals. :D

0beanz3.jpg
 
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Mr. Beanz

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WHEELS
FRONT HUB
Alloy Sealed Bearing 24h - Black
REAR HUB
Alloy Sealed Bearing, 28 Hole, 10x130mm QR
SPOKES/NIPPLES
Black Stainless w/Brass Nipple
RIMS
Alex Alloy Double Wall, 24 Hole Front/28 Hole Rear

Alex has been known to have decent rims.

But I don't like when specs say simply "alloy sealed bearing hubs". IMO that means no name lousy hubs most of the time that will give you so many problems, you'll end up buying a new wheel set.
 
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Mr. Beanz

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Aug 18, 2015
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OH, by the way, I bought my bikes from Trek (they made Lemond bikes back then as well). They have a frame replacement warranty that covered mfg defects. I never crashed and my frames broke at the joints so they covered it no problem, no questions asked. If you buy a use bike, I think you can kiss that warranty good bye. So I buy my bikes new anyway.

Make sure and look into the warranty before you buy. Many of the expensive brands you would think don't. Most the major brands do I think. But look into it. Big brands like Giant, Trek, Specialized, and a few others.
 
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tdcadillac

Member
Jul 1, 2020
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Ha! I think many have their opinions and different experiences. I'm a heavy rider, at 230 I am as skinny as I will ever be, at 6'1 tall. I ride hard at times and at times training for climbing timed events. That is when I noticed I snapped a couple of frames. I was climbing a 10% grade in the mountains when one frame popped. It was a flimsy alum frame to start with, Lemond Tourmalet. Flimsy frame, snapped after 13,000 miles\3 years.

View attachment 4622
Thank you for sharing. as new future rider it is little scary that frame can fell you and broke :(
It was replaced with a Lemond Chambery, partial alum and partial carbon. Another 13,000 miles/3 years and it snapped. I loved this bike, great ride but I think it snapped because of the cut out at the rear dropout that was probably there to cut weight on the frame. So I myself would avoid another frame with a similar cutout. It broke at the aluminum section.

View attachment 4623 View attachment 4624

That was replaced by a full carbon Madone, 15,000+ miles on it and not a problem. It is a 2014 frame.


View attachment 4625

As far as wheels? Being a heavy guy, I don't put much faith in stock wheels. I get about 2,000 miles out of a rear wheel then it's toast. I build my own now and use a Velocity Deep V in the back for durability. Heavy rim but I'd rather ride my bike for 20,000 miles without issue vs ride a light supposedly fast wheel for $2,000 and have to replace it in a year.

I started building my own wheels after way too many issues with machine built and hand built by idiots at the shop. Seriously, I had the same exact model fail after the first 40 miles. I started building my own, same exact equipment, 20,000+ miles out of my first wheel.

Not to mention, the more I train, the less I feel of the wheel weight, not that I feel it anyway. I have had buddies preach expensive light race wheels to me but then they are drafting me ha ha!

So depending on your weight, you may get a decent amount out of stock wheels but at this point, I toss the wheels as soon as I get home because if I am planning on a new bike, I've already built a set of wheels for it.

So use the stock wheel if you can. Then upgrade after that. Bikes aren't wear and toss. You simply replace the difficult component then get back on it again. I've changed my wheels several times on all my bikes.

As far as frames, I have a 1998 ALUMINUM Cannondale that I still ride. Still stiff.

I ride the carbon Trek Madone, 15,000 miles no problem.

Flimsy broken alum frame above.

Broken partial carbon/ alum mix frame that broke at the alum section.

Have a steel tandem from 1997 that we still ride and not a problem.

So nowadays, it is more like get a bike, ride it, if something breaks, replace it. Some frames last longer than others. If I got another alum frame, I'd make sure it wasn't wimpy and flimsy at the bottom bracket area.

As I said, your results may very depending on your size. This is me at 225 pounds. Skinny as I can get at 45 years of age. The guy next to me is 160 pounds. This was in Arizona, just got done riding a mostly solo 62 mile ride at 20 mph average speed. I rode the last 1/3 with a guy who wouldn't stop begging me to ride with him after his team mate had mechanical problems. I just wanted to get back because the first 100 riders in got medals. :D

View attachment 4626
 

tdcadillac

Member
Jul 1, 2020
47
6
8
49
Alex has been known to have decent rims.

But I don't like when specs say simply "alloy sealed bearing hubs". IMO that means no name lousy hubs most of the time that will give you so many problems, you'll end up buying a new wheel set.
as new to bikes and cycling I appreciate all the explanation. Now I know what is bike hub
 
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Mr. Beanz

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ah yes! I make my own wheels. I buy the parts on the internet then build myself. I get a good strong wheel for a good price.

You can buy online then take parts to a bike shop but then you have to pay for labor to build the wheel. AND HOPE the guy is good at building wheels or you will have problems.

Now it is harder to find Shimano hubs on the internet, for me anyway but I haven't been looking lately. But I got them way cheaper than the bike shop.

I bought spokes on the internet, the rim then built myself.

The hubs...........if you can find 105 hubs on the internet, they are inexpensive and very good!

hubs1.JPG


The wheel right after I built it. 30 mm deep rim. Velocity Deep V, very strong rim.

build1A.jpg
 

tdcadillac

Member
Jul 1, 2020
47
6
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49
OH, by the way, I bought my bikes from Trek (they made Lemond bikes back then as well). They have a frame replacement warranty that covered mfg defects. I never crashed and my frames broke at the joints so they covered it no problem, no questions asked. If you buy a use bike, I think you can kiss that warranty good bye. So I buy my bikes new anyway.

Make sure and look into the warranty before you buy. Many of the expensive brands you would think don't. Most the major brands do I think. But look into it. Big brands like Giant, Trek, Specialized, and a few others.
After your great feedback now 2 things i am settled on on my next first new bike ( 105 shimano and frame life warranty)
 

tdcadillac

Member
Jul 1, 2020
47
6
8
49
ah yes! I make my own wheels. I buy the parts on the internet then build myself. I get a good strong wheel for a good price.

You can buy online then take parts to a bike shop but then you have to pay for labor to build the wheel. AND HOPE the guy is good at building wheels or you will have problems.

Now it is harder to find Shimano hubs on the internet, for me anyway but I haven't been looking lately. But I got them way cheaper than the bike shop.

I bought spokes on the internet, the rim then built myself.

The hubs...........if you can find 105 hubs on the internet, they are inexpensive and very good!

View attachment 4627

The wheel right after I built it. 30 mm deep rim. Velocity Deep V, very strong rim.

View attachment 4628
it will take me years in cycling to be able to build my own wheel. I dont know even how to fix a flat wheel. I need to buy a bike and start to learn bit by bit about all the good stuff
 
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