Alzheimer's prevention diet: comment on this family's strategies?



M

Matt

Guest
Hello,

My aunt has compiled the following "rules of thumb" that my family uses for our Alzheimer's
prevention diet. Can anyone comment on these points and/or possibly point to other places of
reference so that we can possibly learn more, maybe read about other perspectives/opinions on
Alzheimer's prevention with diet? Are there other steps we might take above and beyond what is
listed below?

(My grandmother and great-grandmother have experienced Alzheimer's, so my family is quite sensitive
and aware of any reasonable prevention measures that we can take.)

-Matt

[[ My aunt's compilation follows... ]]

I've listed my prevention strategies in order of my perceived importance. These are not proven to
inhibit the disease, but they are good health practices anyway….so what do you have to lose?

1. Choline - This amino acid improves neuro-transmission in the memory portion of the brain.
One of the reason that Grandma took the drug Aricept was to increase the choline production
in the brain.

Choline can be found in eggs, green leafy vegetables, legumes, and tofu. You can also by it in
capsule form. There is no set daily dosage requirement.

2. Vitamin E - A powerful anti-oxidant believed to be the most important of all vitamins in
preventing Alzheimer's. Most research supports taking well above the daily recommended
dosage. I take 1,000 mg. twice a day.

3. Vitamin C - Useful in the development of new brain cells which slows down at the onset of
Alzheimer's. Again research suggests a higher than normal dosage. I take 1,000 mg. three
times a day.

4. Fish oils - Omega 3 fatty acids are rich in fish oils. The highest dosage is found in
sardines, salmon, tuna and turbot. You should be having a minimum of two servings per week.
I take an fatty acid supplement three times a day that contains both Omega 3 and 6. Not only
has it been found to improve brain efficiency, but it also maintains good joint health and
helps guard cholesterol levels.

5. Homocysteine level in Blood - The higher the level of homocysteine, the more likely you are
to develop the disease. Homocysteines has a toxic effect on brain cells that can begin to
age the brain long before Alzheimer's sets in. A blood test can tell you if your levels are
elevated. Take 2 mg. of folic acid to keep them under control. This is more than typically
found in your daily multivitamin.

6. Aluminum - Avoid ingesting it. Aluminum shows up in the autopsies of Alzheimer's victims'
brains. There toxic properties may contribute to the destruction of brain cells. Minimize
your use of soda cans and aluminum cook ware. Watch for traces of harmful metals in your
antacid and other over-the-counter drugs.

7. Ibuprofen - This in the most controversial of the recommendations I am making to you. This
is because regular use of Important may lead to liver and kidney damage, as well as irritate
your stomach lining. Nonetheless, inflammation is also believed to play a big factor in
Alzheimer's. The swelling of the brain membranes is believed to play a part in the
development of amyloid plaques in the brain.

I take one 200 mg. tablet twice a day for several months, then alternate its use with an herbal
supplement alternative. It is called Zyflamend from New Chapter. The herb is not only unproven, but
more expensive than taking Advil. It is much fewer side effects, however.

8. Deep breathing - Oxygen to the brain is critically important to normal reticular activity
that keeps your brain alert. Aerobic exercise, yoga or pilates are great ways to meet
this need.

9. Water - Dehydration effects proper brain function, and most of us walk around in this
condition every day without even realizing it. I keep a water bottle with me almost
everywhere I go and drink one full bottle first thing every morning.

Hope this helps. For more information you may log onto the Alzheimer's website at www.ALZ.org. The
is some incredibly promising research out there using passive immunization of Beta Amyloids that are
believed to be the primary cause of the disease. There are also a new advances in slowing down the
disease through stimulation of nerve growth factors in the brain. Not much can be done at present
until symptoms arise in the victim. Many researchers believe that the damage begins in the brain up
to 20 years before these symptoms first occur. For this reason, it is none to soon for each of you
to take a pro-active stance in your own personal prevention of the disease. I already give [my
children that are 11 and 14] extra E and C and a choline supplement. They seldom drink soda or other
canned drinks and I try to push the water as much as I can. I just can't see a down side to forming
good habits now.
--
Remove the obvious text (including the dash) to email me.
 
M

munk

Guest
Matt:

I have been under the care of my neurologist for nearly three years now for Early Onset Alzheimer's
Disease. I am 54 years old and I think that I have had every test known to man for my condition. For
the last year, my doctors have had me on a regimen of the following:

Reminyl 12 mg twice daily Vitamin E 1000 mg twice daily Vitamin C 1000 mg twice daily Ibuprofen
(Advil) 500 mg nightly

On my own I take (but they do not object), the following:

Shark's Liver Oil gel capsules found at GNC

I drink at least two (2) bottles of tonic water a day for leg cramps for the quinine in it. My
doctors advises that quinine tablets were too much but tonic water was much better. Plus, I drink
lots of water.

I keep my brain very active by doing plenty of puzzles daily and trying to learn something new every
day. I walk daily even when I really don't want to get out.

During the last three months, I have seen a considerable improvement in my condition. Where I would
not leave the house unaccompanied by one of my family members, I am now driving again. I am
remembering things even my husband is forgetting.

I am due for another MRI and tests this month and, hopefully, it will not show near the amount of
brain atrophy that it did last year. Maybe this regimen does work but only time will tell. I am
thankful for the time being that it is working for me, and that it has given me somemore time to
enjoy my family.

Kathy

"Matt" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Hello,
>
> My aunt has compiled the following "rules of thumb" that my family uses for our Alzheimer's
> prevention diet. Can anyone comment on these points and/or possibly point to other places of
> reference so that we can possibly learn more, maybe read about other perspectives/opinions on
> Alzheimer's prevention with diet? Are there other steps we might take above and beyond what is
> listed below?
>
> (My grandmother and great-grandmother have experienced Alzheimer's, so my family is quite
> sensitive and aware of any reasonable prevention measures that we can take.)
>
> -Matt
>
> [[ My aunt's compilation follows... ]]
>
> I've listed my prevention strategies in order of my perceived importance. These are not proven to
> inhibit the disease, but they are good health practices anyway..so what do you have to lose?
>
> 1. Choline - This amino acid improves neuro-transmission in the memory portion of the brain. One
> of the reason that Grandma took the drug Aricept was to increase the choline production in the
> brain.
>
> Choline can be found in eggs, green leafy vegetables, legumes, and tofu. You can also by it in
> capsule form. There is no set daily dosage requirement.
>
> 2. Vitamin E - A powerful anti-oxidant believed to be the most important of all vitamins in
> preventing Alzheimer's. Most research supports taking well above the daily recommended dosage.
> I take 1,000 mg. twice a day.
>
> 3. Vitamin C - Useful in the development of new brain cells which slows down at the onset of
> Alzheimer's. Again research suggests a higher than normal dosage. I take 1,000 mg. three times
> a day.
>
> 4. Fish oils - Omega 3 fatty acids are rich in fish oils. The highest dosage is found in sardines,
> salmon, tuna and turbot. You should be having a minimum of two servings per week. I take an
> fatty acid supplement three times a day that contains both Omega 3 and 6. Not only has it been
> found to improve brain efficiency, but it also maintains good joint health and helps guard
> cholesterol levels.
>
> 5. Homocysteine level in Blood - The higher the level of homocysteine, the more likely you are to
> develop the disease. Homocysteines has a toxic effect on brain cells that can begin to age the
> brain long before Alzheimer's sets in. A blood test can tell you if your levels are elevated.
> Take 2 mg. of folic acid to keep them under control. This is more than typically found in your
> daily multivitamin.
>
> 6. Aluminum - Avoid ingesting it. Aluminum shows up in the autopsies of Alzheimer's victims'
> brains. There toxic properties may contribute to the destruction of brain cells. Minimize your
> use of soda cans and aluminum cook ware. Watch for traces of harmful metals in your antacid and
> other over-the-counter drugs.
>
> 7. Ibuprofen - This in the most controversial of the recommendations I am making to you. This is
> because regular use of Important may lead to liver and kidney damage, as well as irritate your
> stomach lining. Nonetheless, inflammation is also believed to play a big factor in Alzheimer's.
> The swelling of the brain membranes is believed to play a part in the development of amyloid
> plaques in the brain.
>
> I take one 200 mg. tablet twice a day for several months, then alternate its use with an herbal
> supplement alternative. It is called Zyflamend from New Chapter. The herb is not only unproven,
> but more expensive than taking Advil. It is much fewer side effects, however.
>
> 8. Deep breathing - Oxygen to the brain is critically important to normal reticular activity that
> keeps your brain alert. Aerobic exercise, yoga or pilates are great ways to meet this need.
>
> 9. Water - Dehydration effects proper brain function, and most of us walk around in this condition
> every day without even realizing it. I keep a water bottle with me almost everywhere I go and
> drink one full bottle first thing every morning.
>
> Hope this helps. For more information you may log onto the Alzheimer's website at www.ALZ.org. The
> is some incredibly promising research out there using passive immunization of Beta Amyloids that
> are believed to be the primary cause of the disease. There are also a new advances in slowing down
> the disease through stimulation of nerve growth factors in the brain. Not much can be done at
> present until symptoms arise in the victim. Many researchers believe that the damage begins in the
> brain up to 20 years before these symptoms first occur. For this reason, it is none to soon for
> each of you to take a pro-active stance in your own personal prevention of the disease. I already
> give [my children that are 11 and 14] extra E and C and a choline supplement. They seldom drink
> soda or other canned drinks and I try to push the water as much as I can. I just can't see a down
> side to forming good habits now.
> --
> Remove the obvious text (including the dash) to email me.
 
M

Matti Narkia

Guest
Mon, 02 Feb 2004 01:05:49 GMT in article
<[email protected]> Matt
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Hello,
>
>My aunt has compiled the following "rules of thumb" that my family uses for our Alzheimer's
>prevention diet. Can anyone comment on these points and/or possibly point to other places of
>reference so that we can possibly learn more, maybe read about other perspectives/opinions on
>Alzheimer's prevention with diet? Are there other steps we might take above and beyond what is
>listed below?
>
>(My grandmother and great-grandmother have experienced Alzheimer's, so my family is quite sensitive
>and aware of any reasonable prevention measures that we can take.)
>
>-Matt
>
>[[ My aunt's compilation follows... ]]
>
There are some interesting studies about Salvia lavandulaefolia (Spanish Sage). And what's the
current status of Ginkgo biloba?. I know that the results of the trials have been conflicting since
the early successes, but perhaps it may be worth trying together with other supplements. Some other
supplements possibly worth considering: acetyl-L-carnitine, alpha-lipoic acid, phosphatidylserine
and melatonin.

--
Matti Narkia
 
M

Matti Narkia

Guest
Mon, 02 Feb 2004 04:09:57 +0200 in article
<[email protected]> Matti Narkia
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Mon, 02 Feb 2004 01:05:49 GMT in article <[email protected]> Matt <[email protected]
>mengland.net> wrote:
>
>>Hello,
>>
>>My aunt has compiled the following "rules of thumb" that my family uses for our Alzheimer's
>>prevention diet. Can anyone comment on these points and/or possibly point to other places of
>>reference so that we can possibly learn more, maybe read about other perspectives/opinions on
>>Alzheimer's prevention with diet? Are there other steps we might take above and beyond what is
>>listed below?
>>
>>(My grandmother and great-grandmother have experienced Alzheimer's, so my family is quite
>>sensitive and aware of any reasonable prevention measures that we can take.)
>>
>>-Matt
>>
>>[[ My aunt's compilation follows... ]]
>>
>There are some interesting studies about Salvia lavandulaefolia (Spanish Sage). And what's the
>current status of Ginkgo biloba?. I know that the results of the trials have been conflicting since
>the early successes, but perhaps it may be worth trying together with other supplements. Some other
>supplements possibly worth considering: acetyl-L-carnitine, alpha-lipoic acid, phosphatidylserine
>and melatonin.

Perhaps also curcumin and some other substances from Curcuma longa.

--
Matti Narkia
 
J

John De Hoog

Guest
Matti Narkia wrote...

> >[[ My aunt's compilation follows... ]]
> >
> There are some interesting studies about Salvia lavandulaefolia (Spanish Sage). And what's the
> current status of Ginkgo biloba?. I know that the results of the trials have been conflicting
> since the early successes, but perhaps it may be worth trying together with other supplements.
> Some other supplements possibly worth considering: acetyl-L-carnitine, alpha-lipoic acid,
> phosphatidylserine and melatonin.

I'm surprised not to see B12 (as methylcobalamin, 500-1500 micrograms per day) and betaine. B12
works well with folic acid to reduce homocysteine, and betaine has been shown to reduce homocysteine
dramatically.

--
John de Hoog http://dehoog.org
 
C

Capitalist Pig

Guest
On Mon, 02 Feb 2004 01:05:49 GMT, Matt
<[email protected]> wrote:
>
>My aunt has compiled the following "rules of thumb" that my family uses for our Alzheimer's
>prevention diet. Can anyone comment on these points and/or possibly point to other places of
>reference so that we can possibly learn more, maybe read about other perspectives/opinions on
>Alzheimer's prevention with diet? Are there other steps we might take above and beyond what is
>listed below?
>

Have you had the chance to look at LEF's protocol?

http://www.lef.org/protocols/prtcl-006.shtml
 
I

Ignoramus4175

Guest
I would be greatly interested if you posted updates once in a while,
of course if you do not forget:)

I wish you well!

i

In article <[email protected]>, <[email protected]> wrote:
> Matt:
>
> I have been under the care of my neurologist for nearly three years now for Early Onset
> Alzheimer's Disease. I am 54 years old and I think that I have had every test known to man for my
> condition. For the last year, my doctors have had me on a regimen of the following:
>
> Reminyl 12 mg twice daily Vitamin E 1000 mg twice daily Vitamin C 1000 mg twice daily Ibuprofen
> (Advil) 500 mg nightly
>
> On my own I take (but they do not object), the following:
>
> Shark's Liver Oil gel capsules found at GNC
>
> I drink at least two (2) bottles of tonic water a day for leg cramps for the quinine in it. My
> doctors advises that quinine tablets were too much but tonic water was much better. Plus, I drink
> lots of water.
>
> I keep my brain very active by doing plenty of puzzles daily and trying to learn something new
> every day. I walk daily even when I really don't want to get out.
>
> During the last three months, I have seen a considerable improvement in my condition. Where I
> would not leave the house unaccompanied by one of my family members, I am now driving again. I am
> remembering things even my husband is forgetting.
>
> I am due for another MRI and tests this month and, hopefully, it will not show near the amount of
> brain atrophy that it did last year. Maybe this regimen does work but only time will tell. I am
> thankful for the time being that it is working for me, and that it has given me somemore time to
> enjoy my family.
>
> Kathy
>
>
> "Matt" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>> Hello,
>>
>> My aunt has compiled the following "rules of thumb" that my family uses for our Alzheimer's
>> prevention diet. Can anyone comment on these points and/or possibly point to other places of
>> reference so that we can possibly learn more, maybe read about other perspectives/opinions on
>> Alzheimer's prevention with diet? Are there other steps we might take above and beyond what is
>> listed below?
>>
>> (My grandmother and great-grandmother have experienced Alzheimer's, so my family is quite
>> sensitive and aware of any reasonable prevention measures that we can take.)
>>
>> -Matt
>>
>> [[ My aunt's compilation follows... ]]
>>
>> I've listed my prevention strategies in order of my perceived importance. These are not proven to
>> inhibit the disease, but they are good health practices anyway..so what do you have to lose?
>>
>> 1. Choline - This amino acid improves neuro-transmission in the memory portion of the brain. One
>> of the reason that Grandma took the drug Aricept was to increase the choline production in the
>> brain.
>>
>> Choline can be found in eggs, green leafy vegetables, legumes, and tofu. You can also by it in
>> capsule form. There is no set daily dosage requirement.
>>
>> 2. Vitamin E - A powerful anti-oxidant believed to be the most important of all vitamins in
>> preventing Alzheimer's. Most research supports taking well above the daily recommended dosage.
>> I take 1,000 mg. twice a day.
>>
>> 3. Vitamin C - Useful in the development of new brain cells which slows down at the onset of
>> Alzheimer's. Again research suggests a higher than normal dosage. I take 1,000 mg. three times
>> a day.
>>
>> 4. Fish oils - Omega 3 fatty acids are rich in fish oils. The highest dosage is found in
>> sardines, salmon, tuna and turbot. You should be having a minimum of two servings per week. I
>> take an fatty acid supplement three times a day that contains both Omega 3 and 6. Not only has
>> it been found to improve brain efficiency, but it also maintains good joint health and helps
>> guard cholesterol levels.
>>
>> 5. Homocysteine level in Blood - The higher the level of homocysteine, the more likely you are to
>> develop the disease. Homocysteines has a toxic effect on brain cells that can begin to age the
>> brain long before Alzheimer's sets in. A blood test can tell you if your levels are elevated.
>> Take 2 mg. of folic acid to keep them under control. This is more than typically found in your
>> daily multivitamin.
>>
>> 6. Aluminum - Avoid ingesting it. Aluminum shows up in the autopsies of Alzheimer's victims'
>> brains. There toxic properties may contribute to the destruction of brain cells. Minimize your
>> use of soda cans and aluminum cook ware. Watch for traces of harmful metals in your antacid
>> and other over-the-counter drugs.
>>
>> 7. Ibuprofen - This in the most controversial of the recommendations I am making to you. This is
>> because regular use of Important may lead to liver and kidney damage, as well as irritate your
>> stomach lining. Nonetheless, inflammation is also believed to play a big factor in
>> Alzheimer's. The swelling of the brain membranes is believed to play a part in the development
>> of amyloid plaques in the brain.
>>
>> I take one 200 mg. tablet twice a day for several months, then alternate its use with an herbal
>> supplement alternative. It is called Zyflamend from New Chapter. The herb is not only unproven,
>> but more expensive than taking Advil. It is much fewer side effects, however.
>>
>> 8. Deep breathing - Oxygen to the brain is critically important to normal reticular activity that
>> keeps your brain alert. Aerobic exercise, yoga or pilates are great ways to meet this need.
>>
>> 9. Water - Dehydration effects proper brain function, and most of us walk around in this
>> condition every day without even realizing it. I keep a water bottle with me almost everywhere
>> I go and drink one full bottle first thing every morning.
>>
>> Hope this helps. For more information you may log onto the Alzheimer's website at www.ALZ.org.
>> The is some incredibly promising research out there using passive immunization of Beta Amyloids
>> that are believed to be the primary cause of the disease. There are also a new advances in
>> slowing down the disease through stimulation of nerve growth factors in the brain. Not much can
>> be done at present until symptoms arise in the victim. Many researchers believe that the damage
>> begins in the brain up to 20 years before these symptoms first occur. For this reason, it is none
>> to soon for each of you to take a pro-active stance in your own personal prevention of the
>> disease. I already give [my children that are 11 and 14] extra E and C and a choline supplement.
>> They seldom drink soda or other canned drinks and I try to push the water as much as I can. I
>> just can't see a down side to forming good habits now.
 
M

Michaelprice

Guest
John de Hoog wrote

> I'm surprised not to see B12 (as methylcobalamin, 500-1500 micrograms per day) and betaine. B12
> works well with folic acid to reduce homocysteine, and betaine has been shown to reduce
> homocysteine dramatically.

Also thiamine (B1), niacin (B3) and inositol (B8), in addition to folic acid (B9) and
methylcobalamin (B12). Taking the entire range of B-vitamins would probably be wisest.

Cheers, Michael C Price
----------------------------------------
http://mcp.longevity-report.com http://www.hedweb.com/manworld.htm
 
T

Tim Tyler

Guest
Matt <[email protected]> wrote or quoted:

> My aunt has compiled the following "rules of thumb" that my family uses for our Alzheimer's
> prevention diet. Can anyone comment on these points and/or possibly point to other places of
> reference so that we can possibly learn more, maybe read about other perspectives/opinions on
> Alzheimer's prevention with diet? Are there other steps we might take above and beyond what is
> listed below?

Consider going easy on the cake:

``Dietary restriction and 2-deoxyglucose administration improve behavioral outcome and reduce
degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in models of Parkinson's disease''

- http://calorierestriction.org/pmid/?n=10398297

``Dietary restriction retards the age-associated loss of rat striatal dopaminergic receptors''

- http://calorierestriction.org/pmid/?n=7291993

``Food restriction reduces brain damage and improves behavioral outcome following excitotoxic and
metabolic insults''

- http://calorierestriction.org/pmid/?n=9894871

``Dietary restriction protects hippocampal neurons against the death-promoting action of a presenilin-
1 mutation''

- http://calorierestriction.org/pmid/?n=10526115

``Dietary restriction increases the number of newly generated neural
cells, and induces BDNF expression, in the dentate gyrus of rats''

- http://calorierestriction.org/pmid/?n=11220789

...and maybe on the isoquinolines:

``Presence of tetrahydroisoquinoline and 1-methyl-tetrahydro- isoquinoline in foods: compounds
related to Parkinson's disease''

- http://calorierestriction.org/pmid/?n=3398705

``Endogenous risk factors in Parkinson's disease: dopamine and tetrahydroisoquinolines''

- http://calorierestriction.org/pmid/?n=12866710

``Tetrahydroisoquinoline derivatives as possible Parkinson's disease-inducing substances''

- http://calorierestriction.org/pmid/?n=1244014

``Role of noradrenergic system in the mechanism of action of endogenous neurotoxin 1,2,3,4-
tetrahydroisoquinoline: biochemical and functional studies.''

- http://calorierestriction.org/pmid/?n=12020040

``Dopamine-derived endogenous N-methyl-(R)-salsolinol: its role in Parkinson's disease''

- http://calorierestriction.org/pmid/?n=12200189

``In vitro pharmacological activity of the tetrahydroisoquinoline salsolinol present in products
from Theobroma cacao L. like cocoa and chocolate''

- http://calorierestriction.org/pmid/?n=11025151
--
__________
|im |yler http://timtyler.org/ [email protected] Remove lock to reply.
 
T

Tcomeau

Guest
Matt <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> Hello,
>
> My aunt has compiled the following "rules of thumb" that my family uses for our Alzheimer's
> prevention diet. Can anyone comment on these points and/or possibly point to other places of
> reference so that we can possibly learn more, maybe read about other perspectives/opinions on
> Alzheimer's prevention with diet? Are there other steps we might take above and beyond what is
> listed below?
>
> (My grandmother and great-grandmother have experienced Alzheimer's, so my family is quite
> sensitive and aware of any reasonable prevention measures that we can take.)
>
> -Matt
>
> [[ My aunt's compilation follows... ]]
>
> I've listed my prevention strategies in order of my perceived importance. These are not proven to
> inhibit the disease, but they are good health practices anyway?.so what do you have to lose?
>
> 1. Choline - This amino acid improves neuro-transmission in the memory portion of the brain.
> One of the reason that Grandma took the drug Aricept was to increase the choline production
> in the brain.
>
> Choline can be found in eggs, green leafy vegetables, legumes, and tofu. You can also by it in
> capsule form. There is no set daily dosage requirement.
>
> 2. Vitamin E - A powerful anti-oxidant believed to be the most important of all vitamins in
> preventing Alzheimer's. Most research supports taking well above the daily recommended
> dosage. I take 1,000 mg. twice a day.
>
> 3. Vitamin C - Useful in the development of new brain cells which slows down at the onset of
> Alzheimer's. Again research suggests a higher than normal dosage. I take 1,000 mg. three
> times a day.
>
> 4. Fish oils - Omega 3 fatty acids are rich in fish oils. The highest dosage is found in
> sardines, salmon, tuna and turbot. You should be having a minimum of two servings per week.
> I take an fatty acid supplement three times a day that contains both Omega 3 and 6. Not only
> has it been found to improve brain efficiency, but it also maintains good joint health and
> helps guard cholesterol levels.
>
> 5. Homocysteine level in Blood - The higher the level of homocysteine, the more likely you are
> to develop the disease. Homocysteines has a toxic effect on brain cells that can begin to
> age the brain long before Alzheimer's sets in. A blood test can tell you if your levels are
> elevated. Take 2 mg. of folic acid to keep them under control. This is more than typically
> found in your daily multivitamin.
>
> 6. Aluminum - Avoid ingesting it. Aluminum shows up in the autopsies of Alzheimer's victims'
> brains. There toxic properties may contribute to the destruction of brain cells. Minimize
> your use of soda cans and aluminum cook ware. Watch for traces of harmful metals in your
> antacid and other over-the-counter drugs.
>
> 7. Ibuprofen - This in the most controversial of the recommendations I am making to you. This
> is because regular use of Important may lead to liver and kidney damage, as well as irritate
> your stomach lining. Nonetheless, inflammation is also believed to play a big factor in
> Alzheimer's. The swelling of the brain membranes is believed to play a part in the
> development of amyloid plaques in the brain.
>
> I take one 200 mg. tablet twice a day for several months, then alternate its use with an herbal
> supplement alternative. It is called Zyflamend from New Chapter. The herb is not only unproven,
> but more expensive than taking Advil. It is much fewer side effects, however.
>
> 8. Deep breathing - Oxygen to the brain is critically important to normal reticular activity
> that keeps your brain alert. Aerobic exercise, yoga or pilates are great ways to meet this
> need.
>
> 9. Water - Dehydration effects proper brain function, and most of us walk around in this
> condition every day without even realizing it. I keep a water bottle with me almost
> everywhere I go and drink one full bottle first thing every morning.
>
> Hope this helps. For more information you may log onto the Alzheimer's website at www.ALZ.org. The
> is some incredibly promising research out there using passive immunization of Beta Amyloids that
> are believed to be the primary cause of the disease. There are also a new advances in slowing down
> the disease through stimulation of nerve growth factors in the brain. Not much can be done at
> present until symptoms arise in the victim. Many researchers believe that the damage begins in the
> brain up to 20 years before these symptoms first occur. For this reason, it is none to soon for
> each of you to take a pro-active stance in your own personal prevention of the disease. I already
> give [my children that are 11 and 14] extra E and C and a choline supplement. They seldom drink
> soda or other canned drinks and I try to push the water as much as I can. I just can't see a down
> side to forming good habits now.

Don't forgrt to cut refined and High-GI load carbs:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/07/990728073646.htm

A Mayo Clinic study has shown that 50 percent of a group of elderly patients with mild cognitive
impairment who also have a significantly smaller hippocampus portion of the brain are likely to
develop Alzheimer's disease as compared to nine percent of patients with a normal size hippocampus

http://www.defeatdiabetes.org/Archives%20of%20News/march2003.htm

Sustained High Blood Sugar Levels May Damage Brain's Key Memory Center
(03/10/03) An inability to quickly bring down high levels of sugar in the blood is associated with
poor memory and may help explain some of the memory loss that occurs as we age, according
to a new study. The Study raises the possibility that exercise and weight loss, which
help control blood sugar levels, may be able to reverse some of the memory loss that
accompanies aging. The study is the first to show an association between the size of the
hippocampus, a key brain structure for learning and memory, and the ability to control
blood sugar levels in the body, according to the researchers.

http://diabetes.about.com/cs/hyperglycemia/a/blnmemory03.htm

"For every person with Alzheimer's disease, there are some 8 people with memory problems sufficient
to affect the quality of their lives who don't go on to develop dementia," says Dr. Convit. "Our
work seeks to understand what other medical factors influence memory in aging." In fact, says Dr.
Convit, there are now more than 20 reports in the medical literature demonstrating that diabetics
experience memory and learning problems that cannot be explained away by the presence of other
conditions such as cardiovascular disease, which are often associated with diabetes. Diabetics have
very high levels of glucose in the blood because the sugar cannot enter their tissues, where it is
broken down to do useful work.

TC
 
J

John 'The Man

Guest
Once upon a time, our fellow Matt rambled on about "Alzheimer's prevention diet: comment on this
family's strategies?." Our champion De-Medicalizing in sci.med.nutrition retorts, thusly ...

>My aunt has compiled the following "rules of thumb" that my family uses for our Alzheimer's
>prevention diet.

Just about everything has been linked to causing Alzheimer's Disease. There is no compiling proof
that diet is the primary factor.

In my opinion, the best prevention is using your brain, not watching television all day, and getting
plenty of exercise.
--
John Gohde,
Achieving good Health is an Art, NOT a Science!

Health-with-Attitude is a weekly newsletter for people
trying to follow a Healthy Lifestyle.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Health-with-Attitude/
 
B

Baird Stafford

Guest
Matt <[email protected]> wrote:

<snip>

> 2. Vitamin E - A powerful anti-oxidant believed to be the most important of all vitamins in
> preventing Alzheimer's. Most research supports taking well above the daily recommended
> dosage. I take 1,000 mg. twice a day.

Be careful with the E! High doses of this vitamin act as an effective blood-thinner, and should not
be taken without medical supervision if one is already taking a prescribed blood thinner!

<snip>

> 6. Aluminum - Avoid ingesting it. Aluminum shows up in the autopsies of Alzheimer's victims'
> brains. There toxic properties may contribute to the destruction of brain cells. Minimize
> your use of soda cans and aluminum cook ware. Watch for traces of harmful metals in your
> antacid and other over-the-counter drugs.

I'm still waiting for a study on this one to indicate whether the elevated levels of aluminum in the
brains of Alzheimer's victims are the cause of the disease or an effect of it. However, since the
chances in my estimation are fifty-fifty either way, I choose to avoid it....

<snip>

Blessed be, Baird
 
D

David Wright

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Matt <[email protected]> wrote:

>6. Aluminum - Avoid ingesting it. Aluminum shows up in the autopsies of Alzheimer's victims'
> brains. There toxic properties may contribute to the destruction of brain cells. Minimize
> your use of soda cans and aluminum cook ware. Watch for traces of harmful metals in your
> antacid and other over-the-counter drugs.

Some antacids are aluminum compounds. However, the supposed smoking gun for aluminum turned out to
be shooting blanks -- the original "aluminum in the brains of Alzheimer's victims" report was just
bad lab work. They'd stained the brain tissue samples with a stain that contained aluminum. Imagine
that -- when the samples were analyzed, they contained aluminum!

There *may* be a connection between organic aluminum compounds and Alzheimer's, but the evidence is
very thin, and in any case, those aren't compounds most people are coming into contact with.

>9. Water - Dehydration effects proper brain function, and most of us walk around in this
> condition every day without even realizing it.

No, we don't. If we did, we would be thirsty. OK, I'll make an exception for some older people, in
whom the sense of thirst may have become weaker, but the notion that "most of us" are dehydrated is
a medical urban legend.

-- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net These are my opinions only, but they're almost always
correct. "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants were standing on my
shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
 
D

David Wright

Guest
In article <1g8ja1e.19ehhxczmczycN%[email protected]>,
Baird Stafford <[email protected]> wrote:
>Matt <[email protected]> wrote:

>> 6. Aluminum - Avoid ingesting it. Aluminum shows up in the autopsies of Alzheimer's victims'
>> brains. There toxic properties may contribute to the destruction of brain cells. Minimize
>> your use of soda cans and aluminum cook ware. Watch for traces of harmful metals in your
>> antacid and other over-the-counter drugs.
>
>I'm still waiting for a study on this one to indicate whether the elevated levels of aluminum in
>the brains of Alzheimer's victims are the cause of the disease or an effect of it. However, since
>the chances in my estimation are fifty-fifty either way, I choose to avoid it....

Also, the insides of aluminum cans are coated -- the beverage doesn't actually come into contact
with aluminum.

-- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net These are my opinions only, but they're almost always
correct. "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants were standing on my
shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
 
M

Michaelprice

Guest
David Wright wrote
>>9. Water - Dehydration effects proper brain function, and most of us walk around in this condition
>> every day without even realizing it.
>
> No, we don't. If we did, we would be thirsty. OK, I'll make an exception for some older people, in
> whom the sense of thirst may have become weaker, but the notion that "most of us" are dehydrated
> is a medical urban legend.

No, it has a basis in fact

Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol 1988;57(2):220-4

Improved thermoregulation caused by forced water intake in human desert dwellers.

Kristal-Boneh E, Glusman JG, Chaemovitz C, Cassuto Y.

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel.

Residents of the Negev desert in Israel sustain a mild state of dehydration. Low, concentrated urine
outputs, high incidence of kidney diseases and high hematocrit ratios characterize this population.
Educational programs to increase the awareness of the population to the dangers of dehydration have
undoubtedly failed. It was our purpose to see whether forced increased drinking will affect the
above variables. Ten healthy subjects were asked to double their normal voluntary water intake
without (phase II) and with salt supplements (50 mM NaCl, 20 mM KCl) (phase III), for one week.
After phases II and III significant increases in body masses, decreased concentrations of serum
proteins, hemoglobin, hematocrit ratios and serum osmolalities were found. No significant changes
were found in the concentrations of sodium and potassium in the serum. At the end of each phase, the
subjects were asked to exercise on a bicycle ergometer for 60 min at 50% VO2max in a heated chamber
at 45 degrees C, and 30%-50% relative humidity. Experiments were terminated if and when heart-rates
exceeded 180 bpm or the rectal temperature increased to 39 degrees C. After both experimental
phases, subjects increased their tolerance to heat, extending the exercise periods by 25% and 30%.
Compared with their starting levels, hematocrit ratios, serum proteins and hemoglobin concentrations
increased in phases II and III while no changes were recorded in the control period (phase I). It is
suggested that spontaneous voluntary water drinking in desert dwellers is not enough to achieve a
true state of "euhydration".

PMID: 3349990

Am Diet Assoc. 1999 Feb;99(2):200-6.

Erratum in: J Am Diet Assoc 1999 Apr;99(4):411.

Water: an essential but overlooked nutrient.

Kleiner SM.

Nutritional Sciences Program, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.

Water is an essential nutrient required for life. To be well hydrated, the average sedentary adult
man must consume at least 2,900 mL (12 c) fluid per day, and the average sedentary adult woman at
least 2,200 mL (9 c) fluid per day, in the form of noncaffeinated, nonalcoholic beverages, soups,
and foods. Solid foods contribute approximately 1,000 mL (4 c) water, with an additional 250 mL (1
c) coming from the water of oxidation. The Nationwide Food Consumption Surveys indicate that a
portion of the population may be chronically mildly dehydrated. Several factors may increase the
likelihood of chronic, mild dehydration, including a poor thirst mechanism, dissatisfaction with the
taste of water, common consumption of the natural diuretics caffeine and alcohol, participation in
exercise, and environmental conditions. Dehydration of as little as 2% loss of body weight results
in impaired physiological and performance responses. New research indicates that fluid consumption
in general and water consumption in particular can have an effect on the risk of urinary stone
disease; cancers of the breast, colon, and urinary tract; childhood and adolescent obesity; mitral
valve prolapse; salivary gland function; and overall health in the elderly. Dietitians should be
encouraged to promote and monitor fluid and water intake among all of their clients and patients
through education and to help them design a fluid intake plan. The influence of chronic mild
dehydration on health and disease merits further research.

Publication Types: Review Review, Academic

PMID: 9972188 Cheers, Michael C Price
----------------------------------------
http://mcp.longevity-report.com http://www.hedweb.com/manworld.htm
 
T

Tim Tyler

Guest
In sci.life-extension David Wright <[email protected]> wrote or quoted:
> Matt <[email protected]> wrote:

> >9. Water - Dehydration effects proper brain function, and most of us walk around in this
> > condition every day without even realizing it.
>
> No, we don't. If we did, we would be thirsty. OK, I'll make an exception for some older people, in
> whom the sense of thirst may have become weaker, but the notion that "most of us" are dehydrated
> is a medical urban legend.

...perpetuated by studies like this one:

``The Nationwide Food Consumption Surveys indicate that a portion of the population may be
chronically mildly dehydrated. Several factors may increase the likelihood of chronic, mild
dehydration, including a poor thirst mechanism, dissatisfaction with the taste of water, common
consumption of the natural diuretics caffeine and alcohol, participation in exercise, and
environmental conditions. Dehydration of as little as 2% loss of body weight results in impaired
physiological and performance responses.''

- http://calorierestriction.org/pmid/?n=9972188
--
__________
|im |yler http://timtyler.org/ [email protected] Remove lock to reply.
 
J

John 'The Man

Guest
Once upon a time, our fellow Tim Tyler rambled on about "Re: Alzheimer's prevention diet: comment on
this family's strategies?." Our champion De-Medicalizing in sci.med.nutrition retorts, thusly ...

>> >9. Water - Dehydration effects proper brain function, and most of us walk around in this
>> > condition every day without even realizing it.
>>
>> No, we don't. If we did, we would be thirsty. OK, I'll make an exception for some older people,
>> in whom the sense of thirst may have become weaker, but the notion that "most of us" are
>> dehydrated is a medical urban legend.
>
>...perpetuated by studies like this one:
>
> ``The Nationwide Food Consumption Surveys indicate that a portion of the
> population may be chronically mildly dehydrated. Several factors may

The water connection is an ancient concept developed by Dr. Abram Hoffer with equally ancient
research. :(

Actually, to be precise, forced water intake does not cure Alzheimer's nor is it linked to it. It
merely removes a segment of the population misdiagnosed as suffering from dementia.

Ergo, the problem is you science geeks misdiagnosing people suffering from dehydration as
having dementia.

Just thought that you might want to know. :)
--
John Gohde,
Achieving good Health is an Art, NOT a Science!

Health-with-Attitude is a weekly newsletter for people
trying to follow a Healthy Lifestyle.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Health-with-Attitude/
 
T

Tim Tyler

Guest
John 'the Man' <[email protected]> wrote or quoted:
> Once upon a time, our fellow Tim Tyler rambled on about [...]: Our champion De-Medicalizing in
> sci.med.nutrition retorts, thusly ...

> >> >9. Water - Dehydration effects proper brain function, and most of us walk around in this
> >> > condition every day without even realizing it.
> >>
> >> No, we don't. If we did, we would be thirsty. OK, I'll make an exception for some older people,
> >> in whom the sense of thirst may have become weaker, but the notion that "most of us" are
> >> dehydrated is a medical urban legend.
> >
> >...perpetuated by studies like this one:
> >
> > ``The Nationwide Food Consumption Surveys indicate that a portion of the
> > population may be chronically mildly dehydrated. Several factors may
>
> The water connection is an ancient concept developed by Dr. Abram Hoffer with equally ancient
> research. :(
>
> Actually, to be precise, forced water intake does not cure Alzheimer's nor is it linked to it. It
> merely removes a segment of the population misdiagnosed as suffering from dementia.
>
> Ergo, the problem is you science geeks misdiagnosing people suffering from dehydration as having
> dementia.

FWIW, I never meant to make any claims about proper hydration curing any degenerative disorders.

I do think that relatively few individuals are properly hydrated much of the time, though.

Personally, I find it essential to carry a water bottle around with me to stop me from entering what
are plainly states of mild dehydration.

I see a few others following this practice - but only a few.
--
__________
|im |yler http://timtyler.org/ [email protected] Remove lock to reply.
 
A

Alf Christopher

Guest
On Mon, 2 Feb 2004 02:19:52 GMT, "John de Hoog" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>I'm surprised not to see B12 (as methylcobalamin, 500-1500 micrograms per day) and betaine. B12
>works well with folic acid to reduce homocysteine, and betaine has been shown to reduce
>homocysteine dramatically.

One problem with betaine is that it is quite osmotic active and activated aldose reductase which
produce sorbitol from glucose in cells, which is also osmotic active and are very little mobile over
membranes since it is sterically hindered to pass the Cl-regulated channel that do release taurine
and beta-alanine when cell is volume or osmotically challenged (hypoosmosis), the increased sorbitol
steady-state concentration if rate of turnover is not increased in parallell with synthesis will
increase osmotic pressure inside and thus force taurine and betaine to leave cell thus making lack
of protection against hyperhomocysteinamia and lack of protection against uncontrolled glycation,
eg. by lysine of fructose to form an Amadori product 1-amino-1-deoxyfructose lysine adduct) which
most possibly taurine may prevent to be formed by substituting lysine in the normal reaction since
normally, taurine will be in great excess as free amino acid in cells (maybe one of the reasons
intake of free amino acids may be hazardous, while intake of taurine is not dangerous at all since
that will increase protection against formation of such derangeous products as AGEs.

(There are several articles about taurine as glycation scavenger), but here you should read Nature,
vol 414, p. 413ff, Michael Brownlee, Biochemistry and molecular cell biology of diabetic
complications which doesn't mention one word about taurine, but taurine is kicked out of cell by
mechanism 1 (several articles on cell volume regulation taurine as search word, while it protects
against glycation products, it is involved in some phosporylations, and seem to protect against PKC
activation.
 
J

John 'The Man

Guest
Once upon a time, our fellow Tim Tyler rambled on about "Re: Alzheimer's prevention diet: comment on
this family's strategies?." Our champion De-Medicalizing in sci.med.nutrition retorts, thusly ...

>I do think that relatively few individuals are properly hydrated much of the time, though.
>
>Personally, I find it essential to carry a water bottle around with me to stop me from entering
>what are plainly states of mild dehydration.
>
>I see a few others following this practice - but only a few.

At least one study was published last year that said that was just a bunch of hooey. :)

The elderly are chronically dehydrated in the extreme. That does not mean that the average normal
person needs to be sipping at the water trough all day long.
--
John Gohde,
Feeling Great and Better than Ever!

Healers who believe in the healing power of nature,
Vis Mediatix Naturae, worship Hygeia and the vital force.
http://tutorials.naturalhealthperspective.com/history.html