Am I ready to do an Ironman

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Sjhill, May 4, 2003.

  1. Sjhill

    Sjhill Guest

    I signed up to do an Ironman in the end of June. My law school finals this month have allowed
    minimal training. I only have two months to go.....can I do it? I'm having doubts.

    This weekend I completed a 60 mi. bike pacing ~ 16.5 mph. My legs felt fine. I can run at least 13
    miles at an 8 min/mi pace. I have finished 3 marathons in the past three years so I know I'm capable
    of running that far. The swim should be no problem. I was a competitive swimmer.

    The problem is, I have done no BRICKS!!! Until now (summer break), I just couldn't put in the time.

    Is it too late? Should I give up and save my plane ticket money?

    Any advice is much appreciated....
     
    Tags:


  2. Harold Buck

    Harold Buck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "sjhill" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I signed up to do an Ironman in the end of June. My law school finals this month have allowed
    > minimal training. I only have two months to go.....can I do it? I'm having doubts.
    >
    > This weekend I completed a 60 mi. bike pacing ~ 16.5 mph. My legs felt fine. I can run at least 13
    > miles at an 8 min/mi pace. I have finished 3 marathons in the past three years so I know I'm
    > capable of running that far. The swim should be no problem. I was a competitive swimmer.
    >
    > The problem is, I have done no BRICKS!!! Until now (summer break), I just couldn't put in
    > the time.
    >
    > Is it too late? Should I give up and save my plane ticket money?
    >
    > Any advice is much appreciated....

    Well, you pretty much need to be tapering by 3 weeks before the race, which means you have about 5
    weeks. You'd better be able to bike 110 miles or so by then, or don't even think about it.

    --Harold Buck

    "I used to rock and roll all night, and party every day. Then it was every other day. . . ."

    - Homer J. Simpson
     
  3. No bricks, no foundation. Without a foundation your house will crumble. You are not ready for
    Ironperson. Stay home and train more.

    "sjhill" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I signed up to do an Ironman in the end of June. My law school finals this month have allowed
    > minimal training. I only have two months to go.....can I do it? I'm having doubts.
    >
    > This weekend I completed a 60 mi. bike pacing ~ 16.5 mph. My legs felt fine. I can run at least 13
    > miles at an 8 min/mi pace. I have finished 3 marathons in the past three years so I know I'm
    > capable of running that far. The swim should be no problem. I was a competitive swimmer.
    >
    > The problem is, I have done no BRICKS!!! Until now (summer break), I just couldn't put in
    > the time.
    >
    > Is it too late? Should I give up and save my plane ticket money?
    >
    > Any advice is much appreciated....
     
  4. Sounds like the bike is the biggest worry, so work on that most between now and event time. If you
    could find a local century ride to do and can complete it OK, that would give you a lot of
    confidence.

    -S-

    sjhill wrote:
    >
    > I signed up to do an Ironman in the end of June. My law school finals this month have allowed
    > minimal training. I only have two months to go.....can I do it? I'm having doubts.
    >
    > This weekend I completed a 60 mi. bike pacing ~ 16.5 mph. My legs felt fine. I can run at least 13
    > miles at an 8 min/mi pace. I have finished 3 marathons in the past three years so I know I'm
    > capable of running that far. The swim should be no problem. I was a competitive swimmer.
    >
    > The problem is, I have done no BRICKS!!! Until now (summer break), I just couldn't put in
    > the time.
    >
    > Is it too late? Should I give up and save my plane ticket money?
    >
    > Any advice is much appreciated....
     
  5. Rivermist

    Rivermist Guest

    I have never done a triathlon. I compete in duathlons and at distances far shorter than Ironman
    distances. So, I am no expert.

    Having said that, my opinion is that your problem will be on the run, not the bike. I feel that with
    proper pacing you can do the swim and the 112 miles on the bike, but that you may come up short of
    energy during the run.

    I don't mean to discourage you. In fact, I think you should give it a try. Do your best and the
    excitement, adrenalin and will power may get you through. If not, it will be a learning
    experience for you.

    Please write again and tell us how you did.

    "sjhill" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I signed up to do an Ironman in the end of June. My law school finals
    this
    > month have allowed minimal training. I only have two months to go.....can
    I
    > do it? I'm having doubts.
    >
    > This weekend I completed a 60 mi. bike pacing ~ 16.5 mph. My legs felt fine. I can run at least 13
    > miles at an 8 min/mi pace. I have finished 3 marathons in the past three years so I know I'm
    > capable of running that
    far.
    > The swim should be no problem. I was a competitive swimmer.
    >
    > The problem is, I have done no BRICKS!!! Until now (summer break), I just couldn't put in
    > the time.
    >
    > Is it too late? Should I give up and save my plane ticket money?
    >
    > Any advice is much appreciated....
     
  6. Chris Maginn

    Chris Maginn Guest

    It sounds like you are doing IM CDA.....so am I. You have 5 weeks to get in some longer training.
    It's doable. Here's one suggestion for long training sessions between now and the first week of
    June. Assuming a weekend for long stuff here goes:

    Saturdays: Long ride with a 30 - 45 min transition run. Make the bike a little longer each week.
    Example for this Saturday would be to do a 4.5 hour ride at aerobic threshold with some tempo bursts
    built in (on the hills). Do a 30 min transition run with a 10 min tempo session.

    Sunday: 2 hour run with 3/10 min tempo bursts.

    Monday should be recovery and swim.

    Increase your volume gradually to maybe 6.5 hrs bike with a transition run followed by a 2.5hr run
    the next day by beginning of June. I'd stay away from doing a big hammer workout (huge ride with a
    long run the same day). You're liable to overdo it and get hurt or over train. The long runs on
    Sundays after the long ride/transition run on Sat should get you there volume-wise.

    Watch signs that you're overtraining (fatigue that won't quit, or a heart rate that won't rise). Get
    some recovery pace training in after the big weekends. Good luck!

    Steve Freides <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Sounds like the bike is the biggest worry, so work on that most between now and event time. If you
    > could find a local century ride to do and can complete it OK, that would give you a lot of
    > confidence.
    >
    > -S-
    >
    > sjhill wrote:
    > >
    > > I signed up to do an Ironman in the end of June. My law school finals this month have allowed
    > > minimal training. I only have two months to go.....can I do it? I'm having doubts.
    > >
    > > This weekend I completed a 60 mi. bike pacing ~ 16.5 mph. My legs felt fine. I can run at least
    > > 13 miles at an 8 min/mi pace. I have finished 3 marathons in the past three years so I know I'm
    > > capable of running that far. The swim should be no problem. I was a competitive swimmer.
    > >
    > > The problem is, I have done no BRICKS!!! Until now (summer break), I just couldn't put in
    > > the time.
    > >
    > > Is it too late? Should I give up and save my plane ticket money?
    > >
    > > Any advice is much appreciated....
     
  7. Ron C

    Ron C Guest

    You should be fine, I did my first ironman last year with about as much training, I had a good base
    but a bad divorce in the middle of training kind of side railed my training. When it was all done my
    longest ride was about 70 miles, longest run was 16 miles, and longest swim was about 1.2 miles.
    Prior to this I have completed three 1/2 ironmans and 6 marathons.

    Go into it just to finish and enjoy the day, you might suprise yourself.

    Ron C

    "sjhill" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I signed up to do an Ironman in the end of June. My law school finals
    this
    > month have allowed minimal training. I only have two months to go.....can
    I
    > do it? I'm having doubts.
    >
    > This weekend I completed a 60 mi. bike pacing ~ 16.5 mph. My legs felt fine. I can run at least 13
    > miles at an 8 min/mi pace. I have finished 3 marathons in the past three years so I know I'm
    > capable of running that
    far.
    > The swim should be no problem. I was a competitive swimmer.
    >
    > The problem is, I have done no BRICKS!!! Until now (summer break), I just couldn't put in
    > the time.
    >
    > Is it too late? Should I give up and save my plane ticket money?
    >
    > Any advice is much appreciated....
     
  8. Billx

    Billx Guest

    If you're already entered in the race then go for it, otherwise save your money until you are better
    prepared. You didn't mention your age, weight, or goal (finishing time) which factor into the
    likelihood of your success. Riding 60 miles on bike is not the same as 112 miles. If you haven't
    done a couple centuries in the past year those miles could be total torture leaving you unable to
    finish. There are so many long distance cycling problems like sore ass, burning feet, sore back,
    loss of feeling in hands that could pop up between mile 60 and 112. I'm a strong cyclist and have
    many centuries in my past yet would no longer consider doing an IM because of the burning feet
    problem. You also need to have trained for maintaining glucose, hydration and electrolyte levels
    during your IM. Once you start to cramp or bonk the race is over.

    Ron C wrote in message ...
    >You should be fine, I did my first ironman last year with about as much training, I had a good base
    >but a bad divorce in the middle of training kind of side railed my training. When it was all done
    >my longest ride was about 70 miles, longest run was 16 miles, and longest swim was about 1.2 miles.
    >Prior to this I have completed three 1/2 ironmans and 6 marathons.
    >
    >Go into it just to finish and enjoy the day, you might suprise yourself.
    >
    >Ron C
    >
    >
    >"sjhill" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> I signed up to do an Ironman in the end of June. My law school finals
    >this
    >> month have allowed minimal training. I only have two months to
    go.....can
    >I
    >> do it? I'm having doubts.
    >>
    >> This weekend I completed a 60 mi. bike pacing ~ 16.5 mph. My legs felt fine. I can run at least
    >> 13 miles at an 8 min/mi pace. I have finished
    3
    >> marathons in the past three years so I know I'm capable of running that
    >far.
    >> The swim should be no problem. I was a competitive swimmer.
    >>
    >> The problem is, I have done no BRICKS!!! Until now (summer break), I
    just
    >> couldn't put in the time.
    >>
    >> Is it too late? Should I give up and save my plane ticket money?
    >>
    >> Any advice is much appreciated....
    >>
    >
     
  9. Alan Walker

    Alan Walker Guest

    You don't need any brick workouts for the IM.

    You do need 2 things:

    1) Endurance experience. If you've never ridden 100 miles, you should worry about the bike. Several
    people have posted that going 100+ miles is a whole lot different than 60. They are right.

    2) Knowledge of what you can/need in terms of fluids and food. Much of this will knowledge come from
    item (1). I have seen very talented athletes DNF from taking in too little and others from taking
    in too much.

    A friend of mine ran his first marathon in IM Florida about 18 months ago. He was, well, shattered
    at the end, but he finished with a 12:46, which put him ahead of many, many people. But he's a
    strong cyclist.

    You won't win, but neither will I. On the other hand, you can have a very good race and enjoy the
    experience. I can assure you that crossing the finish line is worth the effort and will change the
    way you think about long races.

    Alan.

    IM FL 2001 12:14 IM FL 2002 11:52 IM HA 2003 ?????

    "sjhill" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I signed up to do an Ironman in the end of June. My law school finals
    this
    > month have allowed minimal training. I only have two months to go.....can
    I
    > do it? I'm having doubts.
    >
    > This weekend I completed a 60 mi. bike pacing ~ 16.5 mph. My legs felt fine. I can run at least 13
    > miles at an 8 min/mi pace. I have finished 3 marathons in the past three years so I know I'm
    > capable of running that
    far.
    > The swim should be no problem. I was a competitive swimmer.
    >
    > The problem is, I have done no BRICKS!!! Until now (summer break), I just couldn't put in
    > the time.
    >
    > Is it too late? Should I give up and save my plane ticket money?
    >
    > Any advice is much appreciated....
     
  10. Sjhill

    Sjhill Guest

    >You didn't mention your age, weight, or goal (finishing time) which factor into the
    >likelihood >of your
    success.

    age: 23 weight: 130 height: 5'6'' goal time: to finish

    Thanks for your advice!

    "BillX" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > If you're already entered in the race then go for it, otherwise save your money until you are
    > better prepared. You didn't mention your age, weight, or goal (finishing time) which factor into
    > the likelihood of your success. Riding 60 miles on bike is not the same as 112 miles. If you
    > haven't done
    a
    > couple centuries in the past year those miles could be total torture
    leaving
    > you unable to finish. There are so many long distance cycling problems
    like
    > sore ass, burning feet, sore back, loss of feeling in hands that could pop up between mile 60 and
    > 112. I'm a strong cyclist and have many centuries
    in
    > my past yet would no longer consider doing an IM because of the burning
    feet
    > problem. You also need to have trained for maintaining glucose, hydration and electrolyte levels
    > during your IM. Once you start to cramp or bonk
    the
    > race is over.
    >
    > Ron C wrote in message ...
    > >You should be fine, I did my first ironman last year with about as much training, I had a good
    > >base but a bad divorce in the middle of training kind of side railed my training. When it was all
    > >done my longest ride was about 70 miles, longest run was 16 miles, and longest swim was about 1.2
    > >miles. Prior to this I have completed three 1/2 ironmans and 6
    marathons.
    > >
    > >Go into it just to finish and enjoy the day, you might suprise yourself.
    > >
    > >Ron C
    > >
    > >
    > >"sjhill" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >> I signed up to do an Ironman in the end of June. My law school finals
    > >this
    > >> month have allowed minimal training. I only have two months to
    > go.....can
    > >I
    > >> do it? I'm having doubts.
    > >>
    > >> This weekend I completed a 60 mi. bike pacing ~ 16.5 mph. My legs felt fine. I can run at least
    > >> 13 miles at an 8 min/mi pace. I have
    finished
    > 3
    > >> marathons in the past three years so I know I'm capable of running that
    > >far.
    > >> The swim should be no problem. I was a competitive swimmer.
    > >>
    > >> The problem is, I have done no BRICKS!!! Until now (summer break), I
    > just
    > >> couldn't put in the time.
    > >>
    > >> Is it too late? Should I give up and save my plane ticket money?
    > >>
    > >> Any advice is much appreciated....
    > >>
    > >>
    > >
    >
     
  11. You are so wrong, Alan Walker, and that is why you have such slow Ironman times. Bricks are the
    foundation of training and it's why I will always be faster than you.

    "Alan Walker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > You don't need any brick workouts for the IM.
    >
    > You do need 2 things:
    >
    > 1) Endurance experience. If you've never ridden 100 miles, you should worry about the bike.
    > Several people have posted that going 100+ miles is a whole lot different than 60. They are
    > right.
    >
    > 2) Knowledge of what you can/need in terms of fluids and food. Much of this will knowledge come
    > from item (1). I have seen very talented athletes DNF from taking in too little and others from
    > taking in too much.
    >
    > A friend of mine ran his first marathon in IM Florida about 18 months ago. He was, well, shattered
    > at the end, but he finished with a 12:46, which put him ahead of many, many people. But he's a
    > strong cyclist.
    >
    > You won't win, but neither will I. On the other hand, you can have a very good race and enjoy the
    > experience. I can assure you that crossing the finish line is worth the effort and will change the
    > way you think about long races.
    >
    > Alan.
    >
    > IM FL 2001 12:14 IM FL 2002 11:52 IM HA 2003 ?????
     
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