Amature footage of Lances crash

Discussion in 'Professional Cycling' started by baker3, Jul 12, 2010.

  1. baker3

    baker3 New Member

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    Nasty :eek:

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wHBftK8okyA"]YouTube - Chute Armstrong[/ame]
     
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  2. kjaf

    kjaf New Member

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    man hard to come back from a crash like that. Feel sorry for him lady luck just isnt there this year
     
  3. cutegirl

    cutegirl New Member

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    yea u r right , i agree with you!
     
  4. adam123183

    adam123183 New Member

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    I have a cervelo p1 and I'm interested in converting it into a road bike if possible. I'm not into competing so the geometry isn't all that important I don't think. I just want something to ride for fitness with my girlfriend and I don't really want to purchace a new road bike. Is this possible to achieve or is it too overly complicated? Your response is greatly appreciated.
     
    Adam
     
  5. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    The P1 geometry is designed to work with the rider's center of gravity forward of the bottom bracket, with the upper body supported by the forearms (the "elbows on the table" position). The adaptations that make this possible are the steep 75-78-degree seat tube angle, shallow 72.5-degree head tube angle, and short head tube height. Getting a decent road bike posture would require a seatpost with extreme setback and possibly a riser stem. With the center of gravity so far back, you'd be looking at pretty squirrelly handling, a pounding ride from carrying so much weight on the saddle over such a steep seat tube, and a pile of expense--105 or Ultegra control levers going upwards of $200-350 a pair.
     
    Unless you want to spend the next month or two hunting down parts, working out problems, being a general pain to your local bike shop, and still have a less than ideal tool for the type of riding you want to do, just buy a road bike
     
  6. adam123183

    adam123183 New Member

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    I understand the complications but you don't think this would suffice for short rides up to 20 miles? I'm not looking for a bike that is perfect.
     
  7. jollyrogers

    jollyrogers New Member

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    how steep is your current setup?
     
    what size is the frame?
     
    to make the fit work, you will probably need a short, hi-rise stem. other parts: drop bars, integrated shifters, bar tape, and possibly new cables and housing.
     
    the bike's geometry is sub-optimal for the task, but it is possible to reconfigure. how well it will work depends on your personal dimensions
     
    you could also consider selling the p1 and getting a used road bike...
     
  8. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    For 20 mile rides, for your money, you might as well get a lightly used Allez Elite or Trek 2.1, or something along that line. For the several hundred dollars you put into that P1, you're opening two cans of worms, parts compatibility and fit, and you'll still have a bike that isn't well suited to your purposes and will be seriously devalued if you ever try to sell it.
     
    You wanted advice on a dubious project and I gave you my advice. Do whatever you want.
     
  9. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    IMO, a 72.5º head tube angle isn't out of the norm ...
     
    To oversimplify the situation ...
     
    • If you can set the/(a Road) saddle in the appropriate position (for YOU) relative to the crank AND if you can subsequently find an appropriate length stem then you may actually be good-to-go ...
     
    As others have noted, you might want to raise stem ... BUT, if you are fit AND if you realize the
    Bullhorns are at (or, close to) the level the drops would probably be on a regular Road handlebar, you could just choose a (shorter) stem which would place the reach to brake levers at a distance that would be equivalent to reaching the brakes when your hands would approximate being on the drops of a Road handlebar.
     
    So, IMO, you may really just need a different saddle & possibly a new stem.
     
    So, how tall are you AND what is the length of your TT bike's top tube?
     
    What is the current differential between the top of your Cervelo's saddle and the Bullhorns?

     
  10. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member

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    A cheap solution would be just ride it the way it is. Where is it written that you cant ride a TT bike for short distances. Hey your riding a Cervelo how cool is that./img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
     
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