american classic seat post

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by E Goforth, Mar 10, 2006.

  1. E Goforth

    E Goforth Guest

    Hello,

    I'd heard bad things about these 10 or 15 years ago, that the cradle
    would sag and bend if you stayed in the saddle over bumps. Does anyone
    know if this is/was true? They look the same as they did then.

    -Eric
     
    Tags:


  2. E Goforth wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > I'd heard bad things about these 10 or 15 years ago, that the cradle
    > would sag and bend if you stayed in the saddle over bumps. Does anyone
    > know if this is/was true? They look the same as they did then.
    >
    > -Eric


    Bolt breaks. The gent that works for me has a ugly story about one
    breaking and what it did to his anatomy.....
     
  3. Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
    > E Goforth wrote:
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > I'd heard bad things about these 10 or 15 years ago, that the cradle
    > > would sag and bend if you stayed in the saddle over bumps. Does anyone
    > > know if this is/was true? They look the same as they did then.
    > >
    > > -Eric

    >
    > Bolt breaks. The gent that works for me has a ugly story about one
    > breaking and what it did to his anatomy.....


    Is this relatively common, or the only one that you've heard of that
    did this? I broke the bolt on a Campy Victory or Chorus (one of those
    80's aero style posts).

    -Eric
     
  4. Bill

    Bill Guest

    I have a 1999 Am Classic seatpost. Was the problem
    fixed by then?

    Bill

    "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > E Goforth wrote:
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > I'd heard bad things about these 10 or 15 years ago, that the cradle
    > > would sag and bend if you stayed in the saddle over bumps. Does anyone
    > > know if this is/was true? They look the same as they did then.
    > >
    > > -Eric

    >
    > Bolt breaks. The gent that works for me has a ugly story about one
    > breaking and what it did to his anatomy.....
    >
     
  5. [email protected] wrote:
    > Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
    > > E Goforth wrote:
    > > > Hello,
    > > >
    > > > I'd heard bad things about these 10 or 15 years ago, that the cradle
    > > > would sag and bend if you stayed in the saddle over bumps. Does anyone
    > > > know if this is/was true? They look the same as they did then.
    > > >
    > > > -Eric

    > >
    > > Bolt breaks. The gent that works for me has a ugly story about one
    > > breaking and what it did to his anatomy.....

    >
    > Is this relatively common, or the only one that you've heard of that
    > did this? I broke the bolt on a Campy Victory or Chorus (one of those
    > 80's aero style posts).
    >
    > -Eric


    Saw another yesterday. It's the adjustment bolt that breaks. They
    hardened it but still see enough that I won't sell 'em.
     
  6. Llatikcuf

    Llatikcuf Guest

    Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
    >
    > Bolt breaks. The gent that works for me has a ugly story about one
    > breaking and what it did to his anatomy.....


    Is this not the problem with most (if not all) one bolt posts?

    -Nate
     
  7. Llatikcuf

    Llatikcuf Guest

    Bill wrote:
    > I have a 1999 Am Classic seatpost. Was the problem
    > fixed by then?
    >
    > Bill
    >


    If your really paranoid, replace the bolt every couple of years and
    watch the torque.

    -Nate
     
  8. >> Bolt breaks. The gent that works for me has a ugly story about one
    >> breaking and what it did to his anatomy.....

    >
    > Is this not the problem with most (if not all) one bolt posts?


    No. The problem with the American Classic is the size of that bolt (very
    tiny), added to the flex of that relatively-thin plate that's supposed to do
    all the work. They do break frequently, and sometimes you get a hole punched
    in the plate by the tiny screw (causing it to get loose). Not a great
    design.

    --Mike Jacoubowsky
    Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReaction.com
    Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA

    "Llatikcuf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
    >>
    >> Bolt breaks. The gent that works for me has a ugly story about one
    >> breaking and what it did to his anatomy.....

    >
    > Is this not the problem with most (if not all) one bolt posts?
    >
    > -Nate
    >
     
  9. I have to American Classic seatposts and have never had a problem.
    OTOH, I've had the dread bolt break on a Campy Chorus. Another Chorus
    seatpost I sheared off a couple inches above the binder, but I was
    coming down a mountain road at about 40 and had to take the bike across
    a ditch and into the woods, so that's another story.

    You might be seeking data, but I'm afraid all I can offer is anecdote.

    Cheers,
    Mike Davis
     
  10. Bill

    Bill Guest

    Mike, which post would you recommend?

    Bill

    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > No. The problem with the American Classic is the size of that bolt (very
    > tiny), added to the flex of that relatively-thin plate that's supposed to

    do
    > all the work. They do break frequently, and sometimes you get a hole

    punched
    > in the plate by the tiny screw (causing it to get loose). Not a great
    > design.
    >
    > --Mike Jacoubowsky
    > Chain Reaction Bicycles
    > www.ChainReaction.com
    > Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA
    >
     
  11. E Goforth wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > I'd heard bad things about these 10 or 15 years ago, that the cradle
    > would sag and bend if you stayed in the saddle over bumps. Does anyone
    > know if this is/was true? They look the same as they did then.
    >
    > -Eric


    Don't know about that, but mine bent when the roof rack with 4 bikes
    fell of the car on the interstate in Nevada! Ka-thunk! Look up through
    the sun-roof, no bikes! Look in the rear view, see a clump of bikes
    still on a roof rack tumbling down the highway. That was a rough day.

    Joseph
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...

    >I'd heard bad things about these 10 or 15 years ago, that the cradle
    >would sag and bend if you stayed in the saddle over bumps. Does anyone
    >know if this is/was true? They look the same as they did then.


    I've heard of bolt failers, not cradle problems. I've been riding AC seat
    posts for about 10 years now, and about 30k miles. No failures. At my
    heaviest, I weigh about 170. IIRC, AC seatposts have a weight limit.
    I think the number was 170, or maybe 180.
    -------------
    Alex
     
  13. OK, this is just too scary -- someone, apparently on an American
    Classic, had a bolt break on them during a 200km brevet ride. The next
    week, I spoke with the owner of a bike shop on the route. He remembered
    the rider, he remembered the specific problem, and he remembered the
    fix: Selling the rider a titanium Campy seatpost, used, for sixty
    bucks. It's another anecdote, but that shop owner said it isn't a good
    design. For what it's worth.

    Robert Leone [email protected]
     
  14. Jay Beattie

    Jay Beattie Guest

    Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    > >> Bolt breaks. The gent that works for me has a ugly story about one
    > >> breaking and what it did to his anatomy.....

    > >
    > > Is this not the problem with most (if not all) one bolt posts?

    >
    > No. The problem with the American Classic is the size of that bolt (very
    > tiny), added to the flex of that relatively-thin plate that's supposed to do
    > all the work. They do break frequently, and sometimes you get a hole punched
    > in the plate by the tiny screw (causing it to get loose). Not a great
    > design.


    I think it is great concept, though -- very convenient when it comes to
    changing saddles and keeping an adjustment. Maybe they just need to
    punch up the material.

    I have a bunch of these seat posts on different bikes. I have one from
    1986 or 87 (I think first generation -- it came on a Cannondale T1000),
    and and the bolt has not broken after a lot of hard miles (yet, I
    guess). I am really disappointed to hear that these posts are a
    problem, being that they are an all time favorite for me. -- Jay
    Beattie.
     
  15. Mike Krueger

    Mike Krueger Guest

    E Goforth wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > I'd heard bad things about these 10 or 15 years ago, that the cradle
    > would sag and bend if you stayed in the saddle over bumps. Does anyone
    > know if this is/was true? They look the same as they did then.
    >
    > -Eric


    I weigh about 180, and used an AC seatpost for many years with no
    problems. I ride a Turbomatic saddle, which helps absorb some of the
    road shock. I don't know if that alleviates some of the stress on the
    saddle clamp, but it helps my back.
    I had heard about the saddle cradle on some older AC seatposts bending,
    but they addressed the problem by switching from a stamped plate to a
    forging some years ago. They also moved their manufacturing from the
    USA to Asia around that time.
    Their customer service is good. Last time I contacted them to ask a
    question, the head designer and owner of the company, Bill Shook,
    answered the phone. I don't know if he is still involved, but you might
    give them a call to discuss your concerns.
     
  16. SYJ

    SYJ Guest

    Alex Rodriguez wrote:
    ---snip---
    > IIRC, AC seatposts have a weight limit. I think the number was 170, or maybe 180.

    ---/snip---

    AC's website makes no mention of weight limits on the current iteration
    of their posts. It does, however, state the following:

    "Strong forged cradle plate. Larger 8mm diameter clamp bolt with
    integrated ball swivel for accurate torque.

    Improved forged head for increased strength. Easy to setup and adjust."

    YMMV
    SYJ
     
  17. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    E Goforth wrote:
    > I'd heard bad things about these 10 or 15 years ago, that the cradle
    > would sag and bend if you stayed in the saddle over bumps. Does anyone
    > know if this is/was true? They look the same as they did then.


    Riders whose saddles are way behind the seatpost clamp
    sometimes find that's too much leverage for the design.
    --
    Andrew Muzi
    www.yellowjersey.org
    Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  18. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    >>E Goforth wrote:
    >>>I'd heard bad things about these 10 or 15 years ago, that the cradle
    >>>would sag and bend if you stayed in the saddle over bumps. Does anyone
    >>>know if this is/was true? They look the same as they did then.


    > "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>Bolt breaks. The gent that works for me has a ugly story about one
    >>breaking and what it did to his anatomy.....


    Bill wrote:
    > I have a 1999 Am Classic seatpost. Was the problem
    > fixed by then?


    You write as if it were a defect.
    The bulk of seatpost bolt failures on posts with a single
    vertical bolt are from a loose bolt. Not too much impact on
    a loose bolt will snap it off.
    Some designs, such as the AC, are prone to deformation of
    the saddle rail plates, especially where the saddle is
    extremely far back. Once the plates deform, you have your
    loose bolt.

    Regarding that particular post (also 'Kingsberry'), they are
    light, not too expensive, give good service. Unless you are
    the rider whose saddle is at the farthest extreme setting
    behind the clamp.



    --
    Andrew Muzi
    www.yellowjersey.org
    Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  19. > Mike, which post would you recommend?
    >
    > Bill


    Lots of nice, sturdy, boring seatposts out there. They're just not going to
    be as cheap as the American Classic (which, when they moved production
    offshore, became very inexpensive). I run the stock Bontrager, with the
    new-style clamping system. Works very nicely, is quite light, but the carbon
    ones aren't super-cheap ($85-$130 or so).

    --Mike Jacoubowsky
    Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReaction.com
    Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA

    "Bill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Mike, which post would you recommend?
    >
    > Bill
    >
    > "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> No. The problem with the American Classic is the size of that bolt (very
    >> tiny), added to the flex of that relatively-thin plate that's supposed to

    > do
    >> all the work. They do break frequently, and sometimes you get a hole

    > punched
    >> in the plate by the tiny screw (causing it to get loose). Not a great
    >> design.
    >>
    >> --Mike Jacoubowsky
    >> Chain Reaction Bicycles
    >> www.ChainReaction.com
    >> Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA
    >>

    >
    >
     
  20. Nate Knutson

    Nate Knutson Guest

    E Goforth wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > I'd heard bad things about these 10 or 15 years ago, that the cradle
    > would sag and bend if you stayed in the saddle over bumps. Does anyone
    > know if this is/was true? They look the same as they did then.
    >
    > -Eric


    I saw a trashed one not too long ago on a bike that was a straight up
    custom build not more than a few months old, so I assume it was
    current.

    They still seem to have the best price:weight for cheapish seatposts,
    but not by much.
     
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