American Heart Association Guidelines

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Alan, Feb 27, 2004.

  1. Alan

    Alan Guest

    Hullo All

    Deliberately X-posted to a.s.d and m.h.d. Cut one if you wish.

    I'm sure this is "old news" to many here, but I'm still a learner.

    The "AHA Dietary Guidelines Revised for the New Millennium" were published back in 2001. If anyone
    knows of a later version than the link below, I'd appreciate the reference. It's at:

    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/407333

    I've included a couple of snippets that may be of interest, particularly concerned with fibre,
    cholesterol, eggs etc.

    However, it's not a very long document and very readable to my non-medically trained mind, so I
    would urge anyone interested in dietary recommendations to read it all.

    Some here will disagree with some of the recommendations, but once again a slow change away from the
    old recommendations appears to be happening.

    Some snippets (upper case for emphasis is my own):

    "Abstract A recent statement for health care professionals, issued by the American Heart
    Association, details key measures toward maintaining cardiovascular health. These include increased
    consumption of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains; implementing an exercise program; replacing
    saturated fats with fish and nuts; and limiting salt and alcohol intake."

    <snip>

    "Modifications for Subgroups

    For diabetic patients, increasing fiber in their diets can help lower blood sugar levels.[10]
    However, the AHA recommends that THEY INCREASE FIBER INTAKE THROUGH FOODS THAT CONTAIN UNSATURATED
    FAT (eg, nuts and beans) RATHER THAN CARBOHYDRATES."

    <snip>

    "Juggling Cholesterol Levels

    There is strong evidence that elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels spell
    trouble for the cardiovascular system. Saturated fat, especially in dairy products and meats, is a
    major culprit in raising LDL cholesterol levels.[25]Trans-fatty acids, which the AHA hopes that
    manufacturers will someday list on food labels, also raise LDL cholesterol levels and are found in
    baked goods, fried foods, fast foods, restaurant fare, margarine, and other products made with
    hydrogenated fat. In general, both saturated fat and trans-fatty acid intake should be limited to
    less than 10% of calories.

    One way to lower LDL cholesterol levels is to replace foods high in saturated fat with those foods
    containing polyunsaturated fats (eg, nuts, beans, flaxseed oils). Eating oat products is also
    particularly useful in lowering LDL cholesterol levels.

    The AHA Nutrition Committee members estimate that the general public should strive to limit
    cholesterol consumption to less than 300 milligrams a day. Those who have problems with high LDL
    cholesterol levels, diabetes, or cardiovascular disease should aim for less than 200 milligrams a
    day.[26] Although shellfish and eggs are high in cholesterol, they are low in saturated fat. STUDIES
    HAVE SHOWN THAT EATING SHELLFISH AND EGGS DOES NOT SIGNIFICANTLY AFFECT LDL CHOLESTEROL
    LEVEL.[27,28]"

    You'll have to read the original for context and references.

    Food for thought?

    Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
    --
    Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
     
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  2. Frank Roy

    Frank Roy Guest

    Alan wrote:
    >

    > The "AHA Dietary Guidelines Revised for the New Millennium" were published back in 2001. If anyone
    > knows of a later version than the link below, I'd appreciate the reference. It's at:

    This a search of AHA journals for dietary recommendations. http://tinyurl.com/3b3nq

    Frank
     
  3. Alan

    Alan Guest

    On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 22:51:13 -0500, Frank Roy <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >
    >Alan wrote:
    >>
    >
    >> The "AHA Dietary Guidelines Revised for the New Millennium" were published back in 2001. If
    >> anyone knows of a later version than the link below, I'd appreciate the reference. It's at:
    >
    >This a search of AHA journals for dietary recommendations. http://tinyurl.com/3b3nq
    >
    >Frank

    Thanks Frank More reading to do.

    Cheers, Alan, T2, Australia.
    --
    Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
     
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