American kurt searvogel sets annual mileage record

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by CAMPYBOB, Jan 6, 2016.

  1. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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  2. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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  3. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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  4. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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  5. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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  6. slowspoke

    slowspoke New Member

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    I have been following him all year, absolutely amazing! In the past I have done a total of 2 double century rides spaced several years apart. The fact that Kurt has ridden the equivalent of a double century + every day for an entire year blows my mind in so many ways. He should change his nickname from Tarzan to Superman.:D
     
  7. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    A friend has been following Kurt on STRAVA and the Englishman he was racing to the record against. Both of those guys are hard core!

    RAAM is a tough race...and a sleep deprivation effort on top of the massive miles. Riding 200+ miles each and every day? Impressive!
     
  8. Weatherby

    Weatherby Well-Known Member

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    I can't wrap my head around Kurt's achievement. Astounding. Last year I did a mere 15,000 miles and more than a dozen days with over 200 miles. I cannot imagine doing a double every day for an entire calendar year unless it was in a Velo Mobile on flat Florida roads.
     
  9. pwarbi

    pwarbi Well-Known Member

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    It certainly is quite some achievement and I'd guess it's a record that will take some beating.

    As cycling technology continues to advance, the more records we'll continue to see bring broken but having said that, to achieve these feats the person as a massive part to play in that aswell. I know for a fact that whatever I'm riding, I wouldn't be able to do anywhere near what he's accomplished.
     
  10. slowspoke

    slowspoke New Member

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    15,000 miles! That is quite the accomplishment - congratulations!
     
  11. Weatherby

    Weatherby Well-Known Member

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    Thinking more about Searvogel's daily mileage and how what he said set a goal and just do it....it has given me mojo to reconsider a goal that I had had but crossed it off the list. I want to ride my bike across the USA but I only have 3 weeks including flying to San Diego. It would take 155 miles per day and finding places to sleep, etc. I think the 1000 miles to Texas would be easy but then I would hit Texas and would probably think, it is 1000 miles to get across the Lonely Star State to Louisiana and what am I doing here but once I got to the Gulf, it would be a breeze. I'm thinking of packing the bike and just letting it rip.
     
  12. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    I 'tried' drafting one of those on a flat road ride. Unpossible! First, they throw almost zero draft. Second, they flat out fly as long as there no hills to get over. Dude was holding an easy 28-30 MPH.



    "I want to ride my bike across the USA but I only have 3 weeks including flying to San Diego. It would take 155 miles per day and finding places to sleep, etc. I think the 1000 miles to Texas would be easy but then I would hit Texas and would probably think, it is 1000 miles to get across the Lonely Star State to Louisiana and what am I doing here but once I got to the Gulf, it would be a breeze. I'm thinking of packing the bike and just letting it rip."

    You can do this. If you have not read the thread I put up about the gentleman I ran into a few months ago while he was on his bucket list crossing of America...please do so.

    Link:
    http://www.cyclingforums.com/thread...country-bucket-list-ride.448379/#post-3790885

    Scott's daily ride blog is also linked on that thread and worth reading for the insight into his San Diego to New York crossing.

    Scott was touring with a lead support vehicle and averaging around 120 miles per day. He was not quite so time-limited, but was definitely 'on a mission'. My opinion as to the key to success was his pre-planning all stops. His nephew running interference for him saved all kinds of time and headaches.

    Scott told me he had 10 flats by the time he cleared Texas. Having spare wheels in a SAG would be the ultimate and someone else doing puncture repairs/tube changes while you kept making miles a real time saver. No more flats getting to Ohio.

    Somewhere along the way he had a chain put on incorrectly (OUTSIDE the rear derailleur cage keeper tab!!!) and had ridden hundreds of miles with the chain sapping energy and making noise before he had it diagnosed and repaired/replace in Ohio. Other than that, his trip had been fairly routine...if you can call any trans-con ride routine.
     
  13. bykster

    bykster Member

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    Did he ever stop cycling? He cycled literally more than a 1000 miles per week. That is absolutely insane. I don't think I cycled that much in a year. Crazy.
     
  14. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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  15. Weatherby

    Weatherby Well-Known Member

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    200 miles in a day on flat roads would probably take a strong rider 12 hours give or take a little. I could that easily. Not much of an accomplishment. For a couple days would be a challenge but no big deal. Doing it day in and day out all year long is amazing. Incredible.
     
  16. Weatherby

    Weatherby Well-Known Member

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    Regarding velomobiles I have had some fun chasing one particular fast velomobile on a 600k and a 1200k. They offer no draft and the fellow hit incredible speeds downhill. They really shine on flat and slightly rolling terrain. I might have a better chance using an e-velomobile

    Flats out west......probably would go tubeless with sealant to combat goatheads and the wire from exploded truck tire carcasses. Everybody gets tons of flats riding the interstate shoulders and my route planning shows that there is no way to completely avoid bicycling on the interstate although I could avoid them in California by going thru the mountains and down the glass elevator to borrego springs instead of the easier route using I-8 out of San Diego
     
  17. Weatherby

    Weatherby Well-Known Member

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    His strava data is interesting to me from two perspectives. Overage average speed is astounding. His 2016 yard 5000 feet of climbing in 1200 miles is kinda funny. I can't find a flat enough 100 mile ride to keep it below 5000 feet elevation gain on just one ride. Cycling in Florida is so boring. No wonder he cranked out the mes. Lol
     
  18. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Yeah...the average elevation in Florida is something like 5' ASL! And the largest hill is a puny 345'. The wind can be brutal though. I think he sought wind-sheltered bike paths and the English defenders of the guy that was also going for the HAM record constantly ragged on Kurt for not being a true 'road rider'.

    Kurt's average speed is damned good for an endurance rider. Very close to the best RAAM riders. Even Brian Toone (check out his STRAVA stats!), a state USCF/USAC road race champion and RAAM competitor last summer didn't get quite that speed data. Toone did top one MILLION feet of climbing last year though! And he's got over FIFTEEN MILLION feet on STRAVA!

    Those Velomobiles make some weird noises. The fiberglass shell must act like an amplifier. I was chasing a pair of them when trying to draft the rearmost one and you are correct about their downhill speed. We were going down a slight downgrade when I was dropped like a stone. I was working at maximum output just trying to stay with them...and no way was I capable of the warp speed cruising they could do. Dropped on a downgrade...talk about feeling like a puss.

    I saw both riders later, out of their shells and talking to other riders. Neither looked anywhere close to 'fit'. Aerodynamics hit me like a ton of bricks...

    I sure wish I had run into them on the hilly portion of that ride! I would have showed them a thing or two...right before the road flattened out again! Heh!
     
  19. pwarbi

    pwarbi Well-Known Member

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    I was trying to work out the amount of hours on the road per day he must have done and I also worked it out at between 10 and 12, so that really does take some doing, no matter how good of a cyclist you are.
     
  20. An old Guy

    An old Guy Member

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    Calling this a record is not fair. There have been a number of people who have ridden that far in a year.

    I rode over 200 most days for 2 years. I was not trying to get a record or I would have ridden everyday. 150 miles into a 200 mile ride, there are hills on the right, 4 hours until sunset, head for the hills and the day is 270 miles. Or 150 miles into a winter ride, your toes are cold, and there is no shelter for the next 50 miles.

    200 miles every day is not that hard. Staying well is the hard part.
     
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