America's shame as "The East Coast Balco” is uncovered - OP styled names used...

Discussion in 'Professional Cycling' started by whiteboytrash, Mar 2, 2007.

  1. whiteboytrash

    whiteboytrash New Member

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    A new drugs scandal in the United States is believed to be so potentially damaging that it has been dubbed “The East Coast Balco” and yesterday the first global name was implicated: Evander Holyfield, the four-time heavyweight boxing champion.

    Holyfield issued an immediate denial, but evidence has emerged from raids on a number of pharmacies on the East Coast that raises serious questions about his connections with pharmaceutical companies.

    Holyfield, 44, started his professional career as a cruiserweight more than 20 years ago. He always traded on his moniker, “The Real Deal”, and was long viewed as one of the more admirable figures in the sport. However, that reputation has taken a considerable hammering in recent years as he has ignored all the evidence of his advancing years and refused to retire from the ring.

    Holyfield has won only four of his past ten bouts, yet it was only on Tuesday that he was fuelling the media at a Manhattan press conference with predictions about his achievements at his next bout, which is only 15 days away. The contest is in Corpus Christi, Texas, against Vinny Maddalone, a 33-year-old brawler with an unremarkable record who, Holyfield attested, would be just another statistic on his march to becoming undisputed world heavyweight champion again.

    But even as he spoke, investigators were beginning to analyse their findings from two drugs raids in Florida earlier that day. They were carried out by federal and state agents, one on a clinic in Orlando called the Signature Pharmacy, the other on the Palm Beach Rejuvenation Center in Jupiter. The former is a client of the latter, apparently to the tune of some £10 million.

    It is the size of the business that has attracted the interest of investigators. The fact that their work has thrown up the names of some notable athletes is, to them, something of a sideshow.

    The first name to appear in newspaper reports on Wednesday was Richard Rydze, a team physician for the Pittsburgh Steelers American football franchise, who is alleged to have used his credit card to buy $150,000 worth of human growth hormone from the Signature Pharmacy.

    Yesterday, however, a report from CNNSI.com was alleging that the client lists had led investigators to Holyfield, too. Holyfield was not named in person but the name “Evan Fields”, caught their attention. “Fields”, it allegedly turned out, shares the same birth date as Holyfield — October 19, 1962 — and his address in Fairfield, Georgia, was similar. On telephoning the number on the documents, the call was answered by Holyfield himself, investigators allege.

    According to reports, “Evan Fields” did not receive prescriptions directly through the mail but picked them up through a Georgia physician, whose offices were also raided. The drugs allegedly came from Applied Pharmacy, in Mobile, Alabama, which itself was raided by investigators last autumn.

    Two other names have been linked through the Applied Pharmacy client lists, one associated with the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim baseball franchise and José Canseco, a retired baseball slugger, whose openness about his drugs history is such that he has made a considerable amount of money from selling a book about it.

    Investigators are looking into documents which apparently allege that “Fields” picked up supplies of syringes plus three vials of testosterone and two vials of Glukor, a drug used to treat male impotency but also believed to be used by body-builders before and after steroid cycles; five vials of Saizen, a brand of human growth hormone, and other related supplies. It is claimed that he returned for further treatment for hypogonadism, a form of male impotency.
     
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  2. Bro Deal

    Bro Deal New Member

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    No surprise there. Boxing is a sport that is ideal for steroid use. Fights are infrequent. Testing is only done after the fight. You would have to be an imbecile to fail the dope test. Evander "Three Fists" Holyfield has always been rumored to be a huge steroid user. He put on forty pounds of mucle during his time at heavyweight.
     
  3. meandmybike

    meandmybike New Member

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    Wasn't he coached on the weights by Lee Haney, multiple Mr Olympia winner?
     
  4. Bro Deal

    Bro Deal New Member

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    Yup. Haney was an expert on steroids. It was like Armstrong being trained by Dr. Ferrari. You didn't need to be a rocket scientist to figure out what was going on.
     
  5. helmutRoole2

    helmutRoole2 New Member

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    Or more apt, Landis being trained by Armstrong.

    The thing is, with underground labs, buying steroids isn't that difficult. I'd say it's easier than scoring a bag of weed. And, you don't have to be a genius to use them effectively and with few, if any, health repercussions. Seems like Lee Haney could have hooked him up with a good UGL.
     
  6. House

    House Banned

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    Hey WBT (AKA, Mr. Obsessed) I am curious if you started a thread when OP came out calling it Europe or Spain's "shame?"
     
  7. helmutRoole2

    helmutRoole2 New Member

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    Doping is exclusively an American problem.
     
  8. Felt_Rider

    Felt_Rider Active Member

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    I don't think the PED issue is exclusive to Americans.
    I have coached some guys in other countries that make it sound quite the same as the US.

    While I didn't give advice on his PED cycle the last fellow I consulted in the UK talked as if it were much easier to obtain and to use AAS than we can in the US.

    I personally have seen very little difference between here and Europe, but perhaps my experiences have a narrow vision.
     
  9. BottleCage

    BottleCage New Member

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    The comparison to OP code names is not a surprise. If they knew they were doing something iilegal of course they would try to cover ther tracks.

    My parents live in Jupiter, FL anybody need some gear? :)
     
  10. helmutRoole2

    helmutRoole2 New Member

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    Show me once incident of PED use in Europe... Oh wait, OP. Nevermind
     
  11. lwedge

    lwedge New Member

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    Opie doped? I better tell Andy and Aunt Bea!

    lw
     
  12. tonyzackery

    tonyzackery Well-Known Member

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    What does this thread have to do with cycling???????????????:confused:
     
  13. Tim Lamkin

    Tim Lamkin New Member

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    Why do some truly believe that....I know what you meant, however there are those that :eek:
     
  14. stevebaby

    stevebaby New Member

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    Doping Methods? Cycling? It's a vicious slander.
    It completely escapes me how anyone could possibly connect 'drugs' and 'cycling'.
    It's an outrage to even suggest a connection.
    I'm with you , Tony!
    Drugs have absolutely nothing to do with cycle racing. Together, Tony and I, we'll stamp out this filthy business.
    Recreational use is a different issue though.
    I know that Tony,as a true sportsman, will agree.
    "Self handicapping" by using so-called recreational drugs, is not cheating. In fact, it's in the true spirit of sportsmanship...to know that one's opponents can never reach one's own standards, and to limit chemically one's own superior abilities and performance in order to give one's opponents a sporting chance...is in the highest traditions of the sport.Tony, Helmut,Floyd and I are in full agreement on this.
    I distinctly recall, when riding as Helmut's domestique on Stage 15 of the Vuelta in the hills when Helmut achieved the legendary status normally accorded to Eddie Merckx, that Tony approached us in,as history as shown, a futile break,and that Tony pulled alongside and said "I've got a Bondi Banana mates...and it ain't the unit in my shorts! Godda light?"
    Naturally I,bearing in mind my team responsibilities and our obligation to the fans and WADA , flicked Tony a light to the Rhode Island Rocket and instantly steered him off the mountain into a deep and rocky ditch where he was smashed to pieces and the part of his brain (despite the helmet)which controlled his sense of humour...was destroyed forever. Actually...pulped for all time...never to be recovered...forever.Laughed while I did it too.
    And therein lieth the lesson...
    That the cameraderie of the peleton can never be broken. :D :D :D
     
  15. tonyzackery

    tonyzackery Well-Known Member

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    Uh, anyway...

    The diatribe pertaining to Evander Holyfield's alleged drug use has NOTHING to do with cycling...
     
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