Amy's ride

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by SuzieB, Dec 31, 2005.

  1. SuzieB

    SuzieB New Member

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    The preparations for Amy's Ride started the day before with Euan turning his commuter into a slick red road machine by removing the rack and cleaning the grime off with some carefully applied degreaser and a rinse off with the hose. I got together all the clothes for the ride, a change for later, sunscreen, insect repellent, bidons, food, accessories and made sure the camera was charged. We were in bed by 9.30pm to try and get a decent night's sleep.

    I beat the alarm clock in the morning, up at 5.45am to eat breakfast, shower, get dressed, check email and load the car up. We were on the road at 7am for the drive to Geelong. Easy drive and about half way along we started spotting heaps of other cars with bikes either on the roof, a rack or in the boot. It certainly added to the anticipation of the day.

    Found the house where the rest of the aus.bicycle people were and got ourselves sorted out for the day. We all attached the fabulous aus.bicycle/Wheels of Justice cards to our backs that cfsmtb had made up - we had a few people ask what it was all about so that was positive and cfsmtb was interviewed by someone from The Gooch which should help get the message out.

    Finally everyone was ready to go. An easy 5 minute ride took us down to the Botanical Gardens. A few in the group nearly got collected by a motorist opening her door. I couldn't help yelling out that I thought cyclists would be more careful as I noticed her friend already wearing his Amy's Ride top. I was still a bit shaky on my bike as it was only the second time I had taken her out for a real ride but I soon warmed up.

    We couldn't get anywhere near the start line, there were thousands of people there already. It was awesome just seeing all the different bikes and outfits. Had a slight dilemma wondering where to stash the jersey and water bottle that were included with the ride entry and in the end I left my water bottle for some other lucky person. Just as the ride was starting there was an almighty bang as someone's tire let go then it was a VERY slow "ride" to the start and on our way. After a few of us nearly came off trying to ride so slowly we decided to wait off to the side for a bit of room to ride.

    Finally we got underway. The first 5km was pretty slow as there was a large crowd but soon the mountain bikers turned off onto their trail and the road was clear(ish). Not long after that we faced the only real challenge of the day - the big hill. Another interesting experience for me as I don't get much opportunity to ride up hills around Dingley and had never tried the small ring on my triple. As my heart rate went up to about 174 I dropped the gears down and just turned the legs over. I was pleased I didn't have to walk up but that might have been quicker!

    We had a rest break at the top to regroup and take on water and jelly snakes which are a fine addition to the back pocket of any riders jersey. Euan had to change the gears for me and put the chain back on the middle ring as I just couldn't seem to get it to change. Looks like the bike needs it's first service.

    Off we go again with much chatting, beautiful views and a great piece of cycle lane. After getting caught behind a woman and her little boy I get jack of riding slowly and over take and ride fast for a while. Absolutely awesome feeling. The bike just sings and makes very light work of the kilometres. Next thing we know we are turning off the Geelong Portarlingtom Rd and heading towards Clifton Springs where the gentle slope towards the bay means I can just sit and enjoy the feeling of the bike without having to do any work. I only turned my legs over when I wanted a break from one leg being down.

    By now we are half way through the ride and everyone is doing so well. We had a great group of seven including one brave soul on a mountain bike. It was so lovely to basically ride together and I am looking forward to doing some more social rides.

    As we rode through Drysdale we noticed lots of cyclists stopped at a cafe so of course the consensus was to have a short break. Hey, what else do cyclists do really well? Drink coffee! The break gave everyone a chance to catch their breath and have a pit stop. Back on the road and I did a bit of fast riding before waiting for the others to catch up. Soon enough we were going back down the big hill at about 54 km/h which was scary for me. About 20 minutes later we made it back to Geelong. With the Botanical Gardens in sight we had a brief stop then we got seperated again. Some of us crossed the line from one direction and the rest from the other direction which was an odd experience. The second half of the ride seemed to go much quicker but that might have just been the effects of the caffeine.

    Our band of riders all made it which was great. Euan did a great job bringing up the rear and making sure everyone was okay. I was rather naughty and took off a few times but I was having the most amazing day. It's got me completely hooked on cycling and I'm now planning to do my first 100km with Euan soon. :D

    Stats for the 45km ride (including rides to and from the start)
    Time: 3:38:18 (with stops!)
    Total riding time: 3:00:28
    Average heart rate: 137
    Calories burnt: 1737/45%
    Average speed: 18.5 km/h
    Max speed: 56.4 km/h
    Total distance rode: 55.90km
     


  2. Euan

    Euan Guest

    TimC <[email protected]> writes:

    >
    > Final distance for the day, including from train to home: 134.77km,
    > moving time, 5:12:40, avg 25.9km/h. It was funny - had noticed in the
    > morning that most of the time we were doing 30km/h, so I thought my
    > avg would be up there. Nope, 20. Could barely pass anything for the
    > first 30km. I wonder how that compares to ATB?


    Similar scenario except maybe not quite so acute. I checked our average
    speed at Inkerman street and it was something like 18km/h. By the time
    we got to Sorento it was something like 33 and we spent a lot of time
    35+. It doesn't take much to knock your average way down.
    --
    Cheers | ~~ [email protected]
    Euan | ~~ _-\<,
    Melbourne, Australia | ~ (*)/ (*)
     
  3. SEGFTG

    SEGFTG New Member

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    Yes the 120 was the order of the day. I think a few folk may have been a little challenged by the required climbs (not a problem for myself, I live near the dandenongs and love climbing) was it too much for a 'fun ride'??? Not sure.
    Similair stats 5:18:20 with an average of 25.3 km/h thought it would have been higher but I am sure the very slow first 5 k's bought the average down somewhat.

    I heard it mentioned that it was being planned as an ongoing annual event. Definitely one to keep in the calender.
     
  4. Kathy

    Kathy Guest

    SEGFTG wrote:

    > TimC Wrote:

    snip

    Some people had obviously never seen hills before.
    >>Riding along, and a guy kitted up quite nicely passes us about 15km/h
    >>faster. He then gets in front by about 20m, and just sits there. He
    >>did this a few times whenever things bunched up a bit and we overtook
    >>him. Eventually, he came to a hill, and soiler and I powered up it,
    >>passing almost everyone, and this one obviously quite powerful guy
    >>just stopped in his tracks. Dude! Get off the wind trainer and
    >>practice in some real hills!

    >

    snip

    > Yes the 120 was the order of the day. I think a few folk may have been
    > a little challenged by the required climbs (not a problem for myself, I
    > live near the dandenongs and love climbing) was it too much for a 'fun
    > ride'??? Not sure.
    > Similair stats 5:18:20 with an average of 25.3 km/h thought it would
    > have been higher but I am sure the very slow first 5 k's bought the
    > average down somewhat.
    >
    > I heard it mentioned that it was being planned as an ongoing annual
    > event. Definitely one to keep in the calender.
    >


    I did the 45 (yeah yeah but their were reasons :)
    I actually was way impressed with the quality of riders.. the generally
    high level of skill. High compared with the ATB not just the average fun
    ride. True many people seemed to lack horsepower but I was pretty
    impressed otherwise. More fun rides like this please :) No bumping, no
    nastiness and the only rudeness I even heard of was the usual thing of
    a fast moving bunch overtaking slow riders and the people on the back
    just hanging onto the bunch moving over way too close to the overtaken
    rider. (Kathy)

    Dave
     
  5. oztrev

    oztrev New Member

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    I did the 120km ride, and had a great time. My stats were ride time: 4 hours @ 30 odd km average speed which I was pretty happy with. I rode with a mate of mine in a group of about 15 of his and his g/f's friends. My mate had a flat, but we kept going on his say so. He crossed the line 30 minutes ahead of me. I was riding my new Giant TCR One, and he was on an old 14 speed Hillman!

    I got swallowed up by a large group about 20 km from the end, but didn't give up without a fight. I thought about tagging onto the back of the group, but figured I'd blow myself up and ruin the rest of the ride, so I just went at my own pace for the rest of the ride.

    There was some guy I passed some way before the end, and didn't notice until after he finished that he was riding a single speed (maybe a 52T front 16-20T rear - quite impressive I thought). I saw he had a fixed cog on the other side, and thought about telling him to try fixed next time - now that would be impressive!).

    This was my first ride with so many people, and will definitely not be the last!
     
  6. alison_b

    alison_b New Member

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    What a great day - the weather was perfect, and everybody there seemed keen to enjoy the day.

    Got to Geelong a little later than planned; helped put together 5 bikes (my partner and 3 of his youngsters were doing the family laps). I headed over for registration and pick up the stuff for everybody, then back to find where we'd parked. I'd decided on the 45 so that people weren't waiting around all day for me; this turned out to be a good choice. Though the kids were mostly enjoying it, a couple of hours was enough!

    I saw the start when I was still trying to find registration :rolleyes: but finally rolled over the start line at around 10 past 10. It was good to find the other ab'ers as they were regrouping - I hope your ribs held up through the day cfsmtb! Apologies to Kathy for not recognising her (does anybody else think we all look the same in helmets?? :eek: ).

    I had been hoping to complete the ride in less than 2 hours and managed about 1.45, including a couple of stops for brief chats, which I was pleased with - perfect conditions for a smooth ride. The organisers couldn't have hoped for better :) I hadn't reset my 'puter, but know the top speed for the day was 52 coming down a hill on the way back to Geelong.

    Memorable moments: Amy's family talking before and after their rides, the fellow with the Oscar the Grouch jersey (with matching socks... I *so* want that outfit!), my bike just moved beautifully for the ride and did all it was asked, and for once I wasn't trashed by asthma which has been plaguing me of late.

    I understand it is to be an annual event. I'm looking forward to next year :)

    ali
     
  7. hippy

    hippy New Member

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    Long or short, I usually feel great after a route.

    hippy
     
  8. hgoh

    hgoh Guest

    SuzieB wrote:
    <snipped>
    > We couldn't get anywhere near the start line, there were thousands of
    > people there already. It was awesome just seeing all the different
    > bikes and outfits. Had a slight dilemma wondering where to stash the
    > jersey and water bottle that were included with the ride entry and in
    > the end I left my water bottle for some other lucky person. Just as the
    > ride was starting there was an almighty bang as someone's tire let go
    > then it was a VERY slow "ride" to the start and on our way. After a few
    > of us nearly came off trying to ride so slowly we decided to wait off to
    > the side for a bit of room to ride.

    <snipped>
    > --
    > SuzieB


    That flat might have been me. :) We're all waiting at the starting
    line, itching to get moving, suddenly a loud "PSSSHHHHhhhhhhhh!" Oh
    rats, it's me! What the heck? I wasn't even rolling???

    I get a round of applause from everyone. Jump over the fence with my
    brother for a quick tyre change. We were rushing like mad and managed
    to mess it up by putting another puncture in the spare. Second spare
    tube, take it easy and get it right. I started again while my brother
    sprinted back to the car to get another two spare tubes. I manage to
    change the tube properly this time. My brother calls me on the mobile -
    he took a wrong turn on the way back and he'll me further down the
    circuit. We hooked up and then had to get cracking and catch the rest
    of the 120km group.

    Terrible start, but once I was settled it was a great ride. Perfect
    weather with the sun just right and not too much wind.
     
  9. hgoh

    hgoh Guest

    SuzieB wrote:
    <snipped>
    > We couldn't get anywhere near the start line, there were thousands of
    > people there already. It was awesome just seeing all the different
    > bikes and outfits. Had a slight dilemma wondering where to stash the
    > jersey and water bottle that were included with the ride entry and in
    > the end I left my water bottle for some other lucky person. Just as the
    > ride was starting there was an almighty bang as someone's tire let go
    > then it was a VERY slow "ride" to the start and on our way. After a few
    > of us nearly came off trying to ride so slowly we decided to wait off to
    > the side for a bit of room to ride.

    <snipped>
    > --
    > SuzieB


    That flat might have been me. :) We're all waiting at the starting
    line, itching to get moving, suddenly a loud "PSSSHHHHhhhhhhhh!" Oh
    rats, it's me! What the heck? I wasn't even rolling???

    I get a round of applause from everyone. Jump over the fence with my
    brother for a quick tyre change. We were rushing like mad and managed
    to mess it up by putting another puncture in the spare. Second spare
    tube, take it easy and get it right. I started again while my brother
    sprinted back to the car to get another two spare tubes. I manage to
    change the tube properly this time. My brother calls me on the mobile -
    he took a wrong turn on the way back and he'll me further down the
    circuit. We hooked up and then had to get cracking and catch the rest
    of the 120km group.

    Terrible start, but once I was settled it was a great ride. Perfect
    weather with the sun just right and not too much wind.
     
  10. hgoh

    hgoh Guest

    SuzieB wrote:

    <snipped>
    > We couldn't get anywhere near the start line, there were thousands of
    > people there already. It was awesome just seeing all the different
    > bikes and outfits. Had a slight dilemma wondering where to stash the
    > jersey and water bottle that were included with the ride entry and in
    > the end I left my water bottle for some other lucky person. Just as the
    > ride was starting there was an almighty bang as someone's tire let go
    > then it was a VERY slow "ride" to the start and on our way. After a few
    > of us nearly came off trying to ride so slowly we decided to wait off to
    > the side for a bit of room to ride.

    <snipped>
    > --
    > SuzieB


    That flat might have been me. Literally minutes before the start as
    we're all itching to get moving, I hear a PSSSSHHHHhhhhhhhhh... Oh
    $#%@, it's me! What the %#$!, I wasn't even rolling! Round of applause
    from everyone. Jumped the fence with my brother for a hurried tube
    change. After stuffing up my spare tube from rushing like mad, I manage
    to get my brother's spare changed and pumped up. Meanwhile he was
    sprinting back to the car to get another two spare tubes. We eventually
    hook up then had to get cracking to catch the rest of the 120km group.

    Other than the terrible start, what an excellent day. Perfect weather,
    great views. There was a rider down on Portalington Road barely 5km
    into the ride. Ambulance in attendance but hope it wasn't too serious.
     
  11. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

    Joined:
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    Here's a list of related news articles. :)

    Thousands pay tribute
    http://www.geelonginfo.com.au/readarticle.asp?articleid=18347
    Robbie McEwen signs autographs for Delaine Vigar of Lara and her children Larrah, 2, and Pierce, 9. Photo: MIKE DUGDALE

    Monday, January 9. SIMEON BENNETT

    AN estimated 3000 cyclists from around Australia and overseas descended on Geelong on Saturday for an emotional fundraising ride in honour of Victorian cyclist Amy Gillett, who was killed in Germany last year.

    The inaugural Amy's Ride event was staged as part of the Jayco Bay Cycling Classic held in Geelong over the weekend. Event organiser John Trevorrow said the ride had raised more than $50,000 for the Amy Gillett Foundation, which is helping fund road safety education programs for cyclists and motorists.

    ``It was one of the special days in my lifetime,'' he said. ``It was really an emotional, moving experience.'' Gillett, 29, was killed in Germany last year when she and five other members of the Australian women's cycling team were hit by a car during a training ride.

    Among the big names in Saturday's ride were Robbie McEwen, Baden Cooke, Brad McGee and Oenone Wood. Riders from as far afield as Singapore, Queensland, Canberra, Perth, Adelaide and around Victoria flocked to Geelong for the event.

    Amy's husband Simon Gillett addressed riders at the start line, before Amy's parents Denis and Mary Safe led the event off. ``Amy's mum and dad rode off first, and the whole crowd applauded them,'' Trevorrow said.

    Trevorrow said as far as he knew the ride was the biggest first-start recreational ride in Geelong. ``To get 3000 the first time is quite an amazing thing,'' he said.

    ``It's really because of the cause that it's about.''

    ``It was just a special day.

    ``A lot of people said it was the best ride they'd ever been on.''


    ****

    Cyclists turn out for Amy's Ride
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200601/s1543434.htm
    At least 3,000 cyclists have commemorated the life of Amy Gillett by taking part in a charity bike ride in Geelong, Victoria.

    Gillett died in July last year when she was hit and killed by a car while training with the Australian Institute of Sport's women's road cycling team in Germany. Her family and former team-mates, who were badly injured in the accident, have been overwhelmed by the response to the inaugural fundraiser for the Amy Gillett Foundation. Amy's Ride has raised around $50,000 for the foundation.

    Gillett's husband, Simon, says the ride is a celebration of his late wife's life. Mr Gillett says one of the foundation's aims is to raise awareness of road safety, as well as assist young Australian cyclists.

    "The secondary aim is to support an up-and-coming young cyclist who's nearly national team-level, but not quite, who would benefit from training and racing in Europe," he said. "So that's the second objective and the third one is to act if needed as a safety net for Amy's team-mates in terms of their rehabilitation."

    Gillett's mother, Mary Safe, says the ride is a suitable celebration of her daughter's life. "It's actually Amy's birthday on Monday and I think this is the best party that Amy could ever of had," she said. Gillett's father, Denis Safe, says he is impressed by the number of cyclists the ride has attracted.

    "It's a really fabulous community event and we ride our bikes regularly just in a community way and I know Amy would love it," he said.

    Team-mates

    Gillett's five team-mates injured in the crash in Germany were all in Geelong but only Alexis Rhodes, Kate Nichols and Katie Brown were able to take part in the ride. Louise Yaxley and Lorian Graham are still recovering but it is hoped both will be able to ride in next year's fundraiser.

    It was a milestone and the first group event for Brown, who was initially told she would have to have her left leg amputated after the crash. "I sort of started riding really slowly on the way in, but I actually finished so I was really happy with that," she said.


    ****

    Amy's legacy is a long ride for safer roads
    http://www.theage.com.au/news/natio...for-safer-roads/2006/01/07/1136609985291.html
    By Dan Oakes. January 8, 2006

    IN THE crisp early morning, a brightly hued tribe gathered in Geelong to celebrate the life and mourn the death of one of its own. The thousands of cyclists assembled in the Geelong Botanic Gardens yesterday to take part in Amy's Ride were an impressive sight in multi-coloured jerseys.

    As they departed in a seemingly never-ending stream, it was difficult to imagine a more appropriate commemoration of Amy Gillett-Safe. The fund-raising ride was the brainchild of Simon Gillett, husband of Gillett-Safe, who was killed while training in Germany six months ago with other elite Australian road riders.

    A young driver veered across the road and slammed into the group, leaving Gillett-Safe dead and five of her teammates seriously injured. The proceeds of the event, which comprise four rides of varying difficulty around the Bellarine Peninsula, will go to the Amy Gillett Foundation, which has been set up to promote the safe sharing of roads between motorists and cyclists and to fund up-and-coming female riders.

    "There's been a tremendous reaction from all the cyclists, and not just Australia's national team cyclists," Mr Gillett said. "Anybody who can ride a bike is affected in some way. Hopefully, we can capitalise on that support and make something happen.

    "We're hoping to raise around $60,000 or $70,000, and we'd like to make it an annual event and repeat it in a few cities around the country. So when we get organised, look out." Alongside Mr Gillett in the front row of the ride were Gillett-Safe's parents, Mary and Denis Safe, who said they had been in training for the 45-kilometre ride.

    "It's actually Amy's birthday on Monday and I think this is the best party Amy could ever have wished for," an emotional Mrs Safe said. Also in the front row was the slight figure of Katie Brown, one of the riders who survived the crash, albeit with horrendous leg and wrist injuries that have kept her out of competitive cycling. Yesterday was the first time she had ridden in a pack since last July.

    "Riding in a bunch is obviously very different from just riding with another person, but I'm here for the cause and I'm really looking forward to it," she said. "It's fantastic to have Amy's mum and dad and Simon here, and all the girls who were close to her here to support the foundation. Even people who went through the elite cycling program before are here to support it."

    Brown was joined by the other four victims of last year's crash: Alexis Rhodes and Kate Nichols — both of whom are riding in the Bay Cycling Classic held this week — and Lorian Graham and Louise Yaxley.


    ****
     
  12. dave

    dave Guest

    cfsmtb wrote:
    > Here's a list of related news articles. :)
    >
    > Thousands pay tribute
    > http://www.geelonginfo.com.au/readarticle.asp?articleid=18347
    > Robbie McEwen signs autographs for Delaine Vigar of Lara and her
    > children Larrah, 2, and Pierce, 9. Photo: MIKE DUGDALE
    >
    > Monday, January 9. SIMEON BENNETT
    >
    > AN estimated 3000 cyclists from around Australia and overseas descended
    > on Geelong on Saturday for an emotional fundraising ride in honour of
    > Victorian cyclist Amy Gillett, who was killed in Germany last year.
    >
    > The inaugural Amy's Ride event was staged as part of the Jayco Bay
    > Cycling Classic held in Geelong over the weekend. Event organiser John
    > Trevorrow said the ride had raised more than $50,000 for the Amy
    > Gillett Foundation, which is helping fund road safety education
    > programs for cyclists and motorists.
    >
    > ``It was one of the special days in my lifetime,'' he said. ``It was
    > really an emotional, moving experience.'' Gillett, 29, was killed in
    > Germany last year when she and five other members of the Australian
    > women's cycling team were hit by a car during a training ride.
    >
    > Among the big names in Saturday's ride were Robbie McEwen, Baden Cooke,
    > Brad McGee and Oenone Wood. Riders from as far afield as Singapore,
    > Queensland, Canberra, Perth, Adelaide and around Victoria flocked to
    > Geelong for the event.
    >
    > Amy's husband Simon Gillett addressed riders at the start line, before
    > Amy's parents Denis and Mary Safe led the event off. ``Amy's mum and
    > dad rode off first, and the whole crowd applauded them,'' Trevorrow
    > said.
    >
    > Trevorrow said as far as he knew the ride was the biggest first-start
    > recreational ride in Geelong. ``To get 3000 the first time is quite an
    > amazing thing,'' he said.
    >
    > ``It's really because of the cause that it's about.''
    >
    > ``It was just a special day.
    >
    > ``A lot of people said it was the best ride they'd ever been on.''
    >
    >
    > ****
    >
    > Cyclists turn out for Amy's Ride
    > http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200601/s1543434.htm
    > At least 3,000 cyclists have commemorated the life of Amy Gillett by
    > taking part in a charity bike ride in Geelong, Victoria.
    >
    > Gillett died in July last year when she was hit and killed by a car
    > while training with the Australian Institute of Sport's women's road
    > cycling team in Germany. Her family and former team-mates, who were
    > badly injured in the accident, have been overwhelmed by the response to
    > the inaugural fundraiser for the Amy Gillett Foundation. Amy's Ride has
    > raised around $50,000 for the foundation.
    >
    > Gillett's husband, Simon, says the ride is a celebration of his late
    > wife's life. Mr Gillett says one of the foundation's aims is to raise
    > awareness of road safety, as well as assist young Australian cyclists.
    >
    > "The secondary aim is to support an up-and-coming young cyclist who's
    > nearly national team-level, but not quite, who would benefit from
    > training and racing in Europe," he said. "So that's the second
    > objective and the third one is to act if needed as a safety net for
    > Amy's team-mates in terms of their rehabilitation."
    >
    > Gillett's mother, Mary Safe, says the ride is a suitable celebration of
    > her daughter's life. "It's actually Amy's birthday on Monday and I think
    > this is the best party that Amy could ever of had," she said. Gillett's
    > father, Denis Safe, says he is impressed by the number of cyclists the
    > ride has attracted.
    >
    > "It's a really fabulous community event and we ride our bikes regularly
    > just in a community way and I know Amy would love it," he said.
    >
    > Team-mates
    >
    > Gillett's five team-mates injured in the crash in Germany were all in
    > Geelong but only Alexis Rhodes, Kate Nichols and Katie Brown were able
    > to take part in the ride. Louise Yaxley and Lorian Graham are still
    > recovering but it is hoped both will be able to ride in next year's
    > fundraiser.
    >
    > It was a milestone and the first group event for Brown, who was
    > initially told she would have to have her left leg amputated after the
    > crash. "I sort of started riding really slowly on the way in, but I
    > actually finished so I was really happy with that," she said.
    >
    >
    > ****
    >
    > Amy's legacy is a long ride for safer roads
    > http://tinyurl.com/bswpj
    > By Dan Oakes. January 8, 2006
    >
    > IN THE crisp early morning, a brightly hued tribe gathered in Geelong
    > to celebrate the life and mourn the death of one of its own. The
    > thousands of cyclists assembled in the Geelong Botanic Gardens
    > yesterday to take part in Amy's Ride were an impressive sight in
    > multi-coloured jerseys.
    >
    > As they departed in a seemingly never-ending stream, it was difficult
    > to imagine a more appropriate commemoration of Amy Gillett-Safe. The
    > fund-raising ride was the brainchild of Simon Gillett, husband of
    > Gillett-Safe, who was killed while training in Germany six months ago
    > with other elite Australian road riders.
    >
    > A young driver veered across the road and slammed into the group,
    > leaving Gillett-Safe dead and five of her teammates seriously injured.
    > The proceeds of the event, which comprise four rides of varying
    > difficulty around the Bellarine Peninsula, will go to the Amy Gillett
    > Foundation, which has been set up to promote the safe sharing of roads
    > between motorists and cyclists and to fund up-and-coming female
    > riders.
    >
    > "There's been a tremendous reaction from all the cyclists, and not just
    > Australia's national team cyclists," Mr Gillett said. "Anybody who can
    > ride a bike is affected in some way. Hopefully, we can capitalise on
    > that support and make something happen.
    >
    > "We're hoping to raise around $60,000 or $70,000, and we'd like to make
    > it an annual event and repeat it in a few cities around the country. So
    > when we get organised, look out." Alongside Mr Gillett in the front row
    > of the ride were Gillett-Safe's parents, Mary and Denis Safe, who said
    > they had been in training for the 45-kilometre ride.
    >
    > "It's actually Amy's birthday on Monday and I think this is the best
    > party Amy could ever have wished for," an emotional Mrs Safe said. Also
    > in the front row was the slight figure of Katie Brown, one of the riders
    > who survived the crash, albeit with horrendous leg and wrist injuries
    > that have kept her out of competitive cycling. Yesterday was the first
    > time she had ridden in a pack since last July.
    >
    > "Riding in a bunch is obviously very different from just riding with
    > another person, but I'm here for the cause and I'm really looking
    > forward to it," she said. "It's fantastic to have Amy's mum and dad and
    > Simon here, and all the girls who were close to her here to support the
    > foundation. Even people who went through the elite cycling program
    > before are here to support it."
    >
    > Brown was joined by the other four victims of last year's crash: Alexis
    > Rhodes and Kate Nichols — both of whom are riding in the Bay Cycling
    > Classic held this week — and Lorian Graham and Louise Yaxley.
    >
    >
    > ****
    >
    >

    All well written. The Dan Oakes one especially. All sympathetic.

    Whats going on?

    Dave
     
  13. hgoh

    hgoh Guest

    SuzieB wrote:
    <snipped>
    > We couldn't get anywhere near the start line, there were thousands of
    > people there already. It was awesome just seeing all the different
    > bikes and outfits. Had a slight dilemma wondering where to stash the
    > jersey and water bottle that were included with the ride entry and in
    > the end I left my water bottle for some other lucky person. Just as the
    > ride was starting there was an almighty bang as someone's tire let go
    > then it was a VERY slow "ride" to the start and on our way. After a few
    > of us nearly came off trying to ride so slowly we decided to wait off to
    > the side for a bit of room to ride.

    <snipped>
    > --
    > SuzieB


    That flat could have been me. It happened just minutes before the
    official start. Managed a quick tube change after a round of applause
    from all the riders. Had to do a bit of work to catch up to the rest of
    the 120km. Other than that, excellent day.
     
  14. hgoh

    hgoh Guest

    That flat could have been me. It happened just minutes before the
    official start. Managed a quick tube change after a round of applause
    from all the riders. Had to do a bit of work to catch up to the rest of
    the 120km. Other than that, excellent day.
     
  15. On 2006-01-08, hgoh <[email protected]> wrote:
    > That flat might have been me. :) We're all waiting at the starting
    > line, itching to get moving, suddenly a loud "PSSSHHHHhhhhhhhh!" Oh
    > rats, it's me! What the heck? I wasn't even rolling???


    Um, yes, we got that impression from your other five or six posts along
    these lines ...

    --
    My Usenet From: address now expires after two weeks. If you email me, and
    the mail bounces, try changing the bit before the "@" to "usenet".
     
  16. Random Data

    Random Data Guest

    On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 09:31:45 +0000, Stuart Lamble wrote:

    > Um, yes, we got that impression from your other five or six posts along
    > these lines ...


    I thought he was trying to lessen the embarrassment from the flat by
    making highly visible mistakes.

    (Says the guy who got a flat at the end of a 15 minute lolly stop, while
    sitting 10m from the bike).
    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    Like most computer techie people, I'll happily spend 6 hours trying to
    figure out how to do a 3 hour job in 10 minutes. --Rev. James Cort
     
  17. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On 2006-01-08, hgoh (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > That flat might have been me. Literally minutes before the start as
    > we're all itching to get moving, I hear a PSSSSHHHHhhhhhhhhh... Oh
    > $#%@, it's me!


    The flat we heard was more like a ....












    *!*@#*[email protected]#*@ BANG &^%@&!^%@






    And a whole pile of smoke about 5m from myself. I didn't see anyone
    scurrying to fix their tire, so didn't see who it was. Perhaps the
    culprit wasn't even aware it was their bike (until of course they
    would have attempted to move off), because of the vast masses of
    people around that it could have been. It was about 5 seconds before
    the people around us did start moving off, so incredibly poor timing.

    --
    TimC
    A debugged program is one for which you have not yet found the
    conditions that make it fail. -- Jerry Ogdin
     
  18. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On 2006-01-09, Random Data (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > (Says the guy who got a flat at the end of a 15 minute lolly stop, while
    > sitting 10m from the bike).


    Heh.

    'Soiler hopped on his bike after lunch, and realised... bugger.

    --
    TimC
    Some of you know what the Perl slogan on Windows is, and you can say it
    with me: "It's a good thing there's more than one way to do it, because
    most of them don't work." --Larry Wall
     
  19. hgoh

    hgoh Guest

    Stuart Lamble wrote:
    > On 2006-01-08, hgoh <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > That flat might have been me. :) We're all waiting at the starting
    > > line, itching to get moving, suddenly a loud "PSSSHHHHhhhhhhhh!" Oh
    > > rats, it's me! What the heck? I wasn't even rolling???

    >
    > Um, yes, we got that impression from your other five or six posts along
    > these lines ...
    >
    > --
    > My Usenet From: address now expires after two weeks. If you email me, and
    > the mail bounces, try changing the bit before the "@" to "usenet".


    hehe.....sorry. I was using groups.google.com and it was playing up. I
    kept losing my message and I retyped it. After the third try, I gave up
    and figured it wasn't going to accept my post.

    I'm not an attention-seeker, I promise!
     
  20. Craig Strong

    Craig Strong New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2004
    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey People what a great day we all had,
    We are now getting bagged by the opinionist in the Geelong Advertiser as the front page of yesterdays paper had a photo from along the portarlington road showing us riding about 10 abreast and encroaching into the oncoming lane.
    Not a good look for encouraging cycling safety
     
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